first_imgPrint Email WhatsApp Facebook TAGSfloodsMusic LimerickPrime TImerteSt Mary’s park Linkedin Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Previous articleStorm Darwin causes havoc in city and county as airport forced to closeNext articleStorm Darwin – pictures from Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy center_img NewsCommunityRTE’s Prime Time says it does not pay for audience expensesBy Staff Reporter – February 12, 2014 747 Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up RTE’s Prime Time has said that it does not normally pay expenses for any of the 90 audience members who attend each Tuesday night.The clarification came to light after 12 people from St Mary’s Park, invited to attend the RTE studios for last Tuesday’s edition of the programme, were told that they would not be given expenses for their travel to Dublin and a guarantee or indicate their level of involvement in the live show.Sparking reaction from residents and local council representatives, stricken families, who were described as having “lost everything”, said they would not be in a position to travel to tell their story or give their account.Responding, a spokesperson for RTE said; “Prime Time invites a range of people as audience members to its Tuesday night live programme each week.“Unfortunately it is not possible to guarantee that all audience members who wish to contribute to a discussion will get an opportunity to do so due to the nature of the live broadcast.“RTÉ has extensively covered the severity of the recent flooding across its range of programmes and bulletins, featuring a wide number of accounts from people in badly hit areas.“The recent flooding has affected thousands of Irish people across the country and so as the national public service broadcaster RTÉ continues to highlight the issue including facilitating a debate such as last night’s Prime Time programme.” Advertisement Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launch Applications Open for Performers and Toy Testers for The Late Late Toy Show 2020last_img read more

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaExperts from across the Southeast will share their knowledge Dec.5-6 during the annual Turfgrass Institute and Trade Show at theGwinnett Civic and Cultural Center in Duluth, Ga.This year’s event includes many educational opportunitiesfeaturing some of the turf industry’s top speakers. The leadingcompanies will also be on hand at the institute’s trade show.University of Georgia scientists will present workshops on:* Integrated pest management for ornamentals and turf.* Weed management in tall fescue and zoysia grass.* Management and history of sand-based root zones.* Organic, natural or integrated pest management.* New products and technologies.* The nuts and bolts of turfgrass fungicides.* Basic turfgrass management for Hispanic employees.* Pesticide storage and handling.Scientists from Mississippi State University, the University ofArkansas and Emory University will share their expertise, too.The institute includes a trade show with exhibits from more than50 turf-related companies and associations, with silent auctionseach day. The trade show will also include appearances by theAtlanta Falcon cheerleaders.The cost to attend both days is $180 ($130 for Georgia TurfgrassAssociation members). After Nov. 10, it’s $230 ($180 for GTAmembers) for both days.One-day fees are $140 ($90 GTA), or $190 ($140 GTA) after Nov.10. The fee for the trade show and luncheon only, for either day,is $20 ($15 GTA) or $25 ($20 GTA) after Nov. 10.For more on the Turfgrass Institute and Trade Show, or to signup, call (800) 687-6949. Or e-mail the GTA office [email protected] A program of the event can also be downloadedat www.turfgrass.org/PDF/Attendee_Registration.pdf.GTA presents the institute in cooperation with UGA and 11turf-related associations.last_img read more

first_imgAdib explained that based on IDI’s investigation, not all the doctors had been infected in treatment or isolation rooms. He gave an example of an orthopedic doctor who was exposed to the respiratory disease while operating on a patient who was only later found to be COVID-19 positive.Read also: COVID-19: Public urged to stop accusing medical workers of profiting from outbreakIDI has coordinated with the National COVID-19 task force to raise protection issues for medical workers.“Safety is really important because we don’t know when COVID-19 is going to end,” he said. “I hope that we can build a commitment with the government because we [medical workers] want to be protected.”IDI also confirmed that nine dentists have died from COVID-19 as of early September, in addition to 70 nurses, as reported by the Indonesian Nurses Association (PPNI).Previously, IDI spokesperson Halik Malik said the rising number of COVID-19 cases in the country has affected the well-being and performance of medical workers. A recent survey by the University of Indonesia’s (UI) School of Medicine also reveals that 82 percent of healthcare workers across the country are suffering from burnout.On Friday, health authorities announced 3,737 new confirmed COVID-19 cases in the country, putting the national tally at 210,940 with 8,544 fatalities and more than 150,000 recoveries. (mfp)Topics : The Indonesian Medical Association (IDI) has confirmed the deaths of five more doctors due to COVID-19, bringing the total count to 114 while also urging the government to provide better protection to medical workers fighting in the frontline of the ongoing pandemic.“Two days ago, 109 doctors [had died from COVID-19). Two more doctors died yesterday [Friday] and another three died today,” IDI mitigation team head Adib Khumaidi said on Saturday during a virtual discussion as reported by tribunnews.com.He said that East Java recorded the highest doctor fatalities with 29, followed by North Sumatra with 21. As many as 55 doctors, or around 50 percent of the tally, were general practitioners and the remainder specialists, he added.last_img read more