first_imgHousing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Advertisement RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Email Pictured at the Ireland Chapter of Project Management Institute’s National Project Awards is ( l to r ) Chapter President Pat Lucey, Andrew Murphy Managing Director at Shannon Airport, Graham Doyle, Secretary General of the Irish Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport, Niall MacCarthy, Managing Director at Cork Airport, PwC Portfolio and Programme Management Leader, Féilim Harvey Siobhan O’Donnell, Head of External Communications at daa with the Ireland’s Jubilee Project Award. PIC: MAXWELLPHOTOGRAPHY.IEThe impact of aviation, with Shannon Airport’s role pivotal, in the development of Ireland has been recognised in a major award, ahead of projects such as the state motorway programme and even the introduction of the Smoking Ban.The development of Shannon, Dublin and Cork airports has been recognised as the most influential project undertaken in Ireland over the past 50 years by the Irish Chapter of the Project Management Institute (PMI).Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The ‘Expansion of Ireland’s International Airports’ project was announced as the winner of special PMI anniversary accolade at the Ireland Chapters’ annual National Project Awards on Thursday, November 14, at the Dublin offices of award sponsors PwC in Spencer Dock.The ‘Expansion of Ireland’s International Airports’ was chosen by public vote from a stellar shortlist of eight from nearly 100 initially suggested projects. The shortlist included the Guinness Storehouse; Introduction of the Smoking Ban; Luas Light-rail System; Redevelopment of Croke Park; Regeneration of Dublin Docklands; State Motorway Programme; and The Wild Atlantic Way.Welcoming the award, Shannon Group Chief Executive Mary Considine said: “We are very proud of the influence Shannon Airport has had and continues to have on Ireland’s economic success. Shannon is now and always was an innovator; it’s in our DNA, from the establishment of the world’s first Duty-Free shop in 1947, now grown into a multi-billion dollar global industry, to being the first airport in the world, outside of the Americas, to provide full US Preclearance facilities, making arrival in the US easier and faster. More recently we were also the first airport in Europe to establish an airport sensory room for our customers.“This year we celebrated the 80th anniversary of the landing of the first passenger aircraft, and as a central core of Shannon Group, the airport continues to be a driving force for economic growth in the West of Ireland. It does this through the delivery of global air connectivity to enhance the region attractiveness as a location for FDI and indigenous companies and boosts the tourism industry by providing overseas visitors with gateway access to the Wild Atlantic Way.“Shannon was the birth place of aircraft leasing and today we are continuing to support Shannon’s aviation cluster through our International Aviation Services Centre (IASC). We are very proud and grateful for the honour bestowed on us by Irish public, and of the role that Shannon Airport, through our dedicated employees past and present, has played in growing the Irish economy over the past 50 years.” WhatsApp TAGSairportbusinessClareindustryLimerick City and CountyNewsShannonTransporttravel Facebook Limerick businesses urged to accept Irish Business Design Challenge Exercise With Oxygen Training at Ultimate Health Clinic center_img Previous articlePike Overcome Ballynanty with Controlled DisplayNext articleAlby Mathewson set to leave Munster on Saturday Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie BusinessNewsShannon Airport’s influence has been central in Irish aviation – Shannon Group CEO Mary ConsidineBy Staff Reporter – November 18, 2019 432 Ann & Steve Talk Stuff | Episode 29 | Levelling Up Twitter Linkedin Print Limerick on Covid watch list TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type!last_img read more

first_imgpoco_bw/iStock(HOUSTON) — A massive chemical fire south of Houston, Texas, triggered an emergency order for locals to shelter in place even after a dangerous chemical was detected in the air.Local officials and public health experts say most of the risk from the Deer Park fire has passed and that further testing didn’t find elevated levels of the dangerous chemical after a release this morning.But activists say the nearly week-long incident brought attention to the risk to communities located near facilities in the U.S. that use dangerous chemicals on a daily basis.“We’re all being completely violated in a way that we’re really not talking about,” Yvette Arellano, an activist with Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services, or TEJAS, told ABC News earlier this week.She said TEJAS has been pushing for a more comprehensive air monitoring system around the chemical facilities near Houston, harsher enforcement of violations, and more transparency about the impact of fires like this on the surrounding area.The group says this week’s fire brought attention to incidents they see all the time.The Houston Chronicle reported in 2016 sees an incident at a facility working with hazardous chemicals every six weeks on average.“This is the reason why, whenever there’s a fire people finally get to see what the home of the largest petrochemical complex looks like only when this sort of thing happens and then they turn a blind eye,” said Anna Parras, another member of the group.After Hurricane Harvey, storm-related damage triggered a separate toxic fire that prompted calls for companies to be more prepared for disasters and other unexpected scenarios that could cause problems for the public.Local officials insisted the order to stay inside was a precaution and that further testing didn’t find elevated levels of the chemical. Benzene has been linked to leukemia and other health problems but the concern is typically for long term exposures.Officials from the company, Intercontinental Terminals Company, said the chemicals were released when trying to cover a compromised tank of chemicals early Thursday morning but no additional emissions were detected.But throughout the week exposure to the chemicals, smoke, and small particles from the fire led to concern about the health impacts to children, older populations, and people with chronic illnesses.Susan Arnold, an occupational health professor at the University of Minnesota, agreed with local officials that the public health threat from the smoke earlier in the week and the benzene release was probably limited and not a greater concern if tests haven’t continued to show high levels.“We want people to be informed but not inappropriately alarmed and what we know about benzene, the cancers we know about typically occur from exposure over a long period of time,” she told ABC.Some activists are still skeptical about the comments from officials and say they still want more federal oversight of chemical facilities. Arellano said she’s still concerned and wants more information from state officials on whether residents should be concerned about exposure to chemicals or ash from their homes, pets, or even swimming pools.“Our biggest concern that folks take protective measures post everything to make sure they’re not exposed to any residue,” she said.Environmental groups conducted their own monitoring after Hurricane Harvey and found Benzene levels they said were cause for concern after the Arkema fire, even though it didn’t go over Texas’ recommended limit, according to reporting from ProPublica and the Texas Tribune.Texas has a higher limit for when Benzene released into the air triggers public health warnings than other states like California, which has some of the most stringent environmental regulations in the country. Activists who have been involved in suing to force the Trump administration to implement new rules on chemical facilities say that’s one reason there should be more federal oversight.“I know everybody says well this is a matter for states but if you think about the public health threats it’s silly to think residents in California need to have lower benzene than people in Texas,” said Daniel Rosenberg, director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists.But a former EPA official who worked as deputy administrator for the agency in Texas said EPA only takes a big role in these situations when local officials ask them to, or if there’s an extenuating circumstance. Stan Meiburg, former deputy administrator for EPA Region 6, said Texas officials are very experienced in dealing with these kinds of incidentsBut he said it’s crucial for officials to communicate clearly with communities who may not have a lot of trust in government officials, especially in Texas where the state agency has been accused of close ties to industry. He said its especially important in a situation like this for government to communicate with and help communities that are disproportionately affected by pollution or have fewer resources.“One thing government can do is make sure communities in close proximity to these facilities are being protected in the same way people with more advantages are,” he told ABC.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

first_img Tags Residential Real EstateSilicon Valley Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook co-founders lived at this Los Altos home while creating the site. (Getty, GTeam Rentals)The Silicon Valley home where the creators of Facebook lived during the social network’s early days is up for rent.The six-bedroom home at 1743 Westbrook Avenue in Los Altos is available for $10,000 per month, according to the New York Post. That’s twice what Mark Zuckerberg and company paid when they moved in during the summer of 2004.Zuckerberg, Dustin Moskovitz and Sean Parker had been kicked out of their previous rental — allegedly for tying a zip line from the chimney to the swimming pool — and needed to quickly find a new place to set up shop, according to the publication.Their soon-to-be landlord, Judy Fusco, told the Post that Zuckerberg didn’t even go inside the house before asking if they could rent the place and writing her a $10,000 check. He told her he “planned to connect the world.”ADVERTISEMENT“I said, ‘I don’t care if you are going to connect the world, if this check does not pass, you’re not moving in,’” Fusco said.A young Mark Zuckerburg on the stairs of the Los Altos home. (The Harvard Crimson)They moved in a couple weeks later and the house quickly filled up with desks and interns — at least 10 of whom were bunked up in a sunroom at one point, according to Fusco.She later came to the rescue when her tenants left her house unlocked with their servers vulnerable, and even had the IRS on her back after Zuckerberg claimed she was an employee.Facebook has since spread into much bigger spaces: The firm has offices in many major cities, including 730,000 square feet at New York’s Farley Post Office redevelopment, and an eight-acre campus in Seattle built by outdoor equipment retailer REI.[NYP] — Dennis Lynch Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

first_img Jack Hobbs was primed to strike on his outside, while Golden Horn was tucked in on his heels, as Buick timed his run to perfection, scoring by two and three-quarter lengths. The Anthony Oppenheimer-owned winner does not currently hold an engagement in the Investec Derby. Gosden said: “It’s very much up to Mr Oppenheimer (whether Golden Horn goes to Epsom). He’s been very firm with me that he’s a mile-and-a-quarter horse and he told me that all along, so we will see. “The jockey felt he finished strongly today. He’s a horse who has really come on since he won the Feilden Stakes. When he won the Feilden, we said we’d come to the Dante and that’s what we’ve done. “His work on Friday was superb. Coming up on the train today, I knew they could well be first and second but I half felt this guy is the professional at the moment. ” O’Brien said: “We’re disappointed. There’s obviously something amiss with both of them at the moment. “Ryan (Moore) said JFK travelled very well and then just cut out. He did that at Leopardstown and we put it down to the ground, but there’s obviously something else. “We cant find anything wrong with them at home. All the tests had been ticked off, so there’ll be no Epsom for them. We will stop with them now and give them a break. “As for what we will run in the Derby, we will see what happens in the next two weeks. Those three pulled a long way clear there and I would imagine that their trainers were very happy.” O’Brien completely ruled out any notion of 2000 Guineas winner Gleneagles stepping up in trip for the Derby, comparing him favourably with Giant’s Causeway who notched a string of five Group One wins back in 2000. He said: “There’s no way Gleneagles will be going to Epsom. We haven’t had a horse like him for a long time. He’s an out-and-out miler but with more speed than Giant’s Causeway.” Golden Horn was a thoroughly impressive winner, showing an excellent switch of gears to collar leader Elm Park, surging past Jack Hobbs in the process, with the trio pulling well clear of the rest. Outsider Lord Ben Stack set the early gallop, with Elm Park racing keenly on his heels, but when push came to shove, Andrea Atzeni began to assert on the latter, winner of the Racing Post Trophy at Doncaster in October. Aidan O’Brien was left scratching his head after his duo in the Betfred Dante Stakes at York trailed home a long way behind impressive winner Golden Horn. O’Brien fielded both Ol’ Man River and John F Kennedy but the pair were outpaced when the race began in earnest, finishing second to last and last of the seven runners respectively. John F Kennedy had previously suffered a surprise defeat on his reappearance, while Ol’ Man River had been last in the 2000 Guineas, where he was eased when his chance had gone. Press Associationlast_img read more