first_img Receive email alerts Covid-19 emergency laws spell disaster for press freedom News El SalvadorAmericas Organisation Reporters Without Borders has mixed feelings about the guilty verdicts and sentences ranging from four to 30 years in prison that a court in San Salvador passed yesterday on 11 of the 31 people, mainly gang members, who were tried for the September 2009 murder of Franco-Spanish documentary film-maker Christian Poveda .“The sequence of events and the immediate motive seem clear but was a two-day trial sufficient to establish exactly who did what and to shed light on all the unexplained aspects of this case?” Reporters Without Borders said. “Did it reconstruct the entire story of what happened between Poveda and the young people who appeared in his film? And why was there such a big difference between the sentences requested by the prosecutors and those handed down?”The press freedom organization added: “We greet this verdict with a mixture of relief and frustration. It marks a victory in the fight against impunity but as an attempt to establish the truth, it may have been too hasty.”As instigators and perpetrators of Poveda’s murder, alleged gang leaders Luis Roberto “El Tiger” Vásquez Romero and José Alejandro “El Puma” Melara were each sentenced to 30 years in prison while a female associate, Keiry Geraldina Mallorga Álvarez, was given a 20-year sentence on a charge of complicity.Seven alleged gang members – Javier Amilcar Fuentes, Daniel Cabrera Flores, Juan Anastacio Jiménez, José Mateo Cruz, Armando Rivera, Carlos Peraza and Salvador Peraza – and a former policeman, Juan Napoleón Espinoza Pérez, were each sentenced to four years in prison on criminal association charges.The prosecution had requested 50-year jail terms for 30 defendants on charges of aggravated homicide, instigation and conspiracy, and 56 and a half years for Espinoza, the former policeman, on a charge of criminal association. Two other suspects were never found.Unanswered questionsThe testimony given during the two-day trial and reported in the Salvadoran press should be treated with considerable scepticism. Furthermore, the special court began the trial behind closed doors and did not allow journalists to attend until the second day.Poveda was accused of breaking his promise to provide financial help to the members of the “Mara 18” gang in exchange for being allowed to film them for 16 months for his documentary, La Vida Loca. The gang also allegedly felt betrayed when a pirated DVD version of the film began circulating. They claimed that Poveda had promised not to release the film in El Salvador and to edit out a couple of scenes that were compromising for some of the gang’s members.There is no longer any way of establishing whether Poveda really did promise La Vida Loca’s protagonists any financial aid. Claims of this kind are unfortunately often made to discredit a victim. The pirated DVD does not seem to be a credible motive inasmuch as Poveda had no interest in seeing a version of his film circulated and sold without his agreement. Who pirated it and with what purpose are questions that have yet to be answered.These developments clearly undermined the trust that had previously existed between Poveda and the gang members but fail to account for his murder. According to the prosecution, the decision to kill him was taken when Espinoza, who was then a policeman, told the gang that Poveda was acting a police informer against them. But what motive would Espinoza have for telling the gang this? Another unanswered question.According to the testimony given in court during the trial, 15 gang members met in a house on the outskirts of the capital on 25 August 2009 and sentenced Poveda to death in his absence. He was asked to come to a meeting five days later but was out of the country. The sentence was finally carried out on 2 September 2009 in La Campanera, the neighbourhood on the outskirts of the capital where La Vida Loca was filmed.“I have a meeting in La Campanera with four furious crazies,” he told Carole Solive, the film’s producer, and his close friend Alain Mingam, a member of the Reporters Without Borders board, shortly before his death.Despite its reservations about the outcome of this case, Reporters Without Borders is well aware of the difficulty of combating organized crime and rendering justice in such circumstances. Read the report on organized crime that Reporters Without Borders released on 24 February . April 11, 2020 Find out more El SalvadorAmericas Follow the news on El Salvador News to go furthercenter_img RSF_en March 10, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Mixed feelings as court jails 11 people for Franco-Spanish filmmaker’s murder October 7, 2020 Find out more Salvadorean president’s alarming hostility towards independent media News Salvadorean authorities must not obstruct coronavirus coverage News Help by sharing this information June 12, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

first_imgWhatsApp Twitter Linkedin Previous articleLISTEN: Camogie manager “looking forward to having a crack off Galway on Sunday”Next articlePeople’s Museum all set for summer opening date Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Séighin Ó’Cheallaigh, and Malachy McCreesh, Sinn Féin. Photo: Cian ReinhardtTHE waiting time for driving tests in Limerick is “completely unacceptable”.That’s the view of Sinn Féin councillor Séighin Ó Ceallaigh, who was responding to figures obtained by his party this week which show the target is not being met in up to half of the State’s test centres.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The average waiting time in Limerick is 12 weeks.“This does not include the figure of 1,084 who are awaiting a scheduled test date for a test,” the City East representative said.“The RSA (Road Safety Authority) say they aim to have a national average waiting time for a driving test of no longer than 10 weeks. The longest number of weeks people in Limerick waiting for a driving test is 20 weeks, nearly half a year to do a driving test.”According to Ó Ceallaigh, the main factor causing this is the shortage of testers to deal with the demand.“A significant number of testers have retired in recent years. This is foreseeable, and I do not accept that new testers could not have been recruited to ensure that these retirements did not affect the service.“The recruitment process has been slow and is simply not good enough. The Minister needs to support the RSA in recruiting significant numbers of new testers to cope with demand.“This situation has been ongoing for a long time and it is completely unacceptable that this hasn’t been resolved to date.“People in County Limerick, and even in parts of the city are completely reliant on driving to get to work or education. Public transport is simply not an option for many people with either a shortage of services, or no service at all within walking distance.“Many commuters would have to take two buses and walk to their place of employment or education, and often the times don’t suit their need. It very important that these waiting times be resolved, in order to facilitate those who are ready to take their test and are reliant on driving to go about their daily business,” he concluded. Emailcenter_img NewsPoliticsWaiting times for driving tests in Limerick ‘completely unacceptable’By Alan Jacques – March 8, 2019 992 Print Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgJessica Sibley’s pair of second-period goals led Syracuse (6-7-1, 4-1-1 College Hockey America) to a 5-1 victory over RIT (3-11, 0-6), its second victory over its conference rival this season.Nicole Ferrara led the way for the SU in the first period. The captain’s breakaway goal 10 minutes into the contest gave Syracuse a 1-0 lead, and the Orange wouldn’t look back.Sibley scored her first goal of the game with 11 minutes remaining left in the second period, beating RIT defender Haley Northcote with a goal that trickled through goalie Jenna de Jonge’s legs.Stephanie Grossi scored her sixth goal of the season on a backhanded shot with four minutes remaining in the second period, while Sibley would score again with five seconds left before the second intermission.Syracuse’s four goals matched RIT’s four shots on goal at the end of the second period.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTwo freshmen scored their first collegiate goals in the third period. SU’s Allie Munroe found the net four minutes into the final period, while RIT’s Brooke Baker scored with 10 minutes left in regulation.Sibley had a game-high three points on two goals and one assist.The Orange plays its 12th road game of the season on Friday, facing Colgate at 7 p.m. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 18, 2015 at 9:36 pm Contact Chris: [email protected]last_img read more