first_imgNews Google experiments drop Australian media from search results RSF condemns Facebook’s blocking of journalistic content in Australia January 21, 2021 Find out more June 4, 2019 – Updated on June 5, 2019 Australian police raid journalist’s home in Canberra February 22, 2021 Find out more Organisation News AustraliaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsMedia independenceProtecting sources Judicial harassment Reporters Without Borders (RSF) unreservedly condemns this morning Australian federal police raid on a News Corps journalist’s home in Canberra, the capital. Intimidation of this kind poses a grave threat to journalists’ independence and to respect for the confidentiality of their sources, RSF warned. RSF_en News Armed with a warrant issued by a Canberra magistrate for an investigation into “alleged publishing of information classified as an official secret,” the police searched her home and seized her computer, her mobile phone and printed documents. Australia is ranked 21st out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index, after falling two places. AustraliaAsia – Pacific Protecting journalistsMedia independenceProtecting sources Judicial harassment center_img “National security cannot be used as grounds for violating press freedom in a story that is so manifestly in the public interest,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “This search warrant is clearly an attempt to intimidate reporters who want to investigate subjects that could embarrass the government. And it poses an unacceptable threat to respect for the confidentiality of their sources. We call on Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s government to stop harassing journalists.” The raid was prompted by a story published in April 2018 revealing that the departments of defence and home affairs were considering extending their powers so that they could order the intelligence agencies to spy on the emails, text messages and bank accounts of any Australian citizen. The target of the raid, the kind of surprise visit every journalist could do without, was Annika Smethurst, the political editor of News Corp’s Sunday newspapers, including The Sunday Telegraph. Follow the news on Australia Intimidation News Australian federal police raided on News Corps journalist Annika Smethurst ’s home in Canberra (photos : News Corp Australia – William West / AFP). to go further After today’s raid, Ben Fordham, a presenter on the Sydney radio station 2GB and a contributor to Sky News, revealed that he is being investigated by the department of home affairs in connection with his story yesterday about six asylum-seeker boats that are bound for Australia. Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia November 19, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

first_img Reporters Without Borders has written to Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper asking him to use the Francophone Summit being held in Bucharest on 28-29 September 2006 to raise the cases of four jailed Vietnamese cyber-dissidents with Vietnamese officials attending the summit. Nguyen Vu Binh, Truong Quoc Huy, Le Nguyen Sang and Huynh Nguyen Dao are all in prison for having expressed their views on the Internet. Follow the news on Vietnam Help by sharing this information Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam RSF_en Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prison News “Dear Prime Minister,During your meetings with Vietnamese officials at the next summit of the Francophone countries on 28-29 September in Bucharest, Reporters Without Borders asks you to intercede on behalf of Nguyen Vu Binh, Truong Quoc Huy, Le Nguyen Sang and Huynh Nguyen Dao, four cyber-dissidents who are currently in prison in Vietnam just for expressing their views online.A former journalist with an official publication of the Communist Party of Vietnam, Nguyen Vu Binh is a pro-democracy activist and founder of Democracy and Freedom, an independent organisation. He was arrested in 2002 after writing many articles calling for political and economic reform that were posted on the Internet. He was sentenced on 31 December 2003 to seven years in prison and three years of house arrest. The severity of his sentence was motivated in part by his testimony to the US congress in 2002 about human rights violation in Vietnam, and by one if his articles, condemned as reactionary, criticising a 1999 treaty between Vietnam and China.Truong Quoc Huy, 25, was arrested on 18 August 2006 by plain-clothes police who followed him into an Internet café in Ho Chi Minh City and caught him as he was connecting to a democracy chat room. He had just been held for nine months without trial because of his online activities prior to his arrest with his brother and a friend in October 2005. He is accused of wanting to “overthrow the government” and of giving interviews to foreign radio stations after getting out of prison in which he expressed support for the 8406 Group, a pro-democracy movement formed in April.Le Nguyen Sang (the pseudonym used by Nguyen Hoang Long) and Huynh Nguyen Dao (the pseudonym of Huynh Viet Lang) were reportedly arrested in Ho Chi Minh City on or around 14 August. The authorities have not said anything about their arrest but it is believed they are being held because of what they wrote on the Internet and because of their suspected membership of the People’s Democratic Party of Vietnam, an organisation formed by exiles that is illegal inside Vietnam. These two cyber-dissidents were arrested at the same time, and for the same reasons, as Cong Thanh Do, a US citizen who was released on 21 September after foreign diplomats intervened.These four citizens are imprisoned in Vietnam for expressing their democratic views online. Contrary to what the Vietnamese authorities say, none of them is a terrorist, a criminal or a spy. They are being punished for using the Internet to publicly voice their disagreement with the one-party state’s official line.Vietnam will soon join the World Trade Organisation. It has also been chosen to host the summit of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. We believe that the normalisation of diplomatic relations with this country and its integration into the world economy should be accompanied by concrete advances in respect for human rights.We welcomed the release of Pham Hong Son on 30 August as an encouraging gesture by Vietnam’s new leaders. We have nonetheless seen that they continue to suppress free expression and to imprison dissident Internet users.As the International Organisation of Francophone Countries (OIF) carries out political initiatives on behalf of peace, democracy and human rights, we ask you to take advantage of this coming summit to affirm your commitment to online free expression and your support for Vietnamese cyber-dissidents.We thank you in advance for the interest you take in this letter.Sincerely,”Robert MénardSecretary-General Receive email alerts April 22, 2021 Find out more Organisation Le Nguyen Sang and Huynh Nguyen Dao————-Create your blog with Reporters without borders: www.rsfblog.org RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trang September 27, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Plea to Canada’s PM to raise cases of cyber-dissidents at Francophone Summit News News April 27, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders has written to Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper asking him to use the Francophone Summit being held in Bucharest on 28-29 September to raise the cases of four jailed Vietnamese cyber-dissidents with Vietnamese officials attending the summit. Nguyen Vu Binh (picture), Truong Quoc Huy, Le Nguyen Sang and Huynh Nguyen Dao are all in prison for having expressed their views on the Internet. VietnamAsia – Pacific April 7, 2021 Find out more VietnamAsia – Pacific News to go furtherlast_img read more

first_imgNews Help by sharing this information SyriaMiddle East – North Africa RSF_en Toll of ten years of civil war on journalists in Syria The information ministry has threatened Arab and foreign media that are “illegally” in Syria, while Syrian journalists and bloggers continue to be arrested.In a 9 March communiqué, the information ministry threatened to take measures against Arab and foreign journalists who have entered the country “illegally” and against anyone cooperating with them. The minister accused the foreign media of complicity with the “terrorists” and, by covering their activities” of “justifying their crimes.” He also accused them of “fabricating” reports.The minister reiterated the view that, if news media allow their reporters to enter Syria illegally, they are morally and legally responsible for what happens to them. This is similar to the position that the government took after the bombardment of the Media Centre in the Homs district of Baba Amr in which Rémi Ochlik and Marie Colvin were killed, Paul Conroy and Edith Bouvier were injured and two other journalists, William Daniels and Javier Espinosa were trapped.The Syrian authorities have boasted of giving permission to 365 Arab and foreign media to enter the country since the start of the uprising in March 2011. Reporters Without Borders nonetheless receives reports every day of Syrian consulates refusing to issue visas to news media or freelance journalists. And those that receive permission are not necessarily able to work freely and independently, without risking arrest or death.And while the minister openly threatens foreign reporters, Syrian journalists and bloggers continue to be arrested.In one of the latest incidents, Othman Matar, the father of the journalist Gheith Matar, was arrested on 8 March.The 12 young people arrested on the evening of 7 March in the restaurant Niniar, in the Damascus neighbourhood of Bab Sharqi, included Yara Michel Shammas, 20, an information technology specialist who is the daughter of a human rights lawyer active in Facebook, Jehad Jamal, a blogger known by the name of Milan, who had been released on 29 December after two and a half months in detention and Etab Labbad, a 20-year-old journalism student who has worked with various newspapers and websites such as Kassioun and Baladna.Reporters Without Borders reiterates its call for the release of Mazen Darwish, the head of the Syrian Centre for Media and Freedom of Expression, and eight other people held since the 16 February raid on the centre – Hussein Ghareer, Hani Zetani, Joan Farso, Bassam Al-Ahmad, Mansour Al-Omari, Abdel Rahman Hamada, Ayham Ghazzoul and Shady Yazbek.Syria is one of the countries on the “Enemies of the Internet” list that Reporters Without Borders released yesterday. The Media Centres created by the Local Coordination Committees in Syria were awarded the 2012 Netizen Prize. Syria is ranked 176th out of 179 countries in the Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.Many journalists and netizens are meanwhile still detained without any information being available about their current status. This partial list was prepared with help from the Syrian Centre for Media and Freedom of Expression:- Said Dairky, an engineer employed by the national TV station who was arrested on 14 January. – Alaa Shueiti, a cyber-activist arrested on 15 October in Homs.- Mos’ab Massoud, a journalist with Addounia, who was arrested on 1 October after posting an article on Elaph headlined “The ministry of media and information and the question of sectarianism.”- Firas Fayyad, a filmmaker who was arrested on 1 December at Damascus airport as he was about to fly to Dubai.- Bilal Ahmad Bilal, a Falesteen TV producer who was arrested in the Damascus suburb of Mo’adamieh on 13 September.- Abdelmajid Rashed Al-Rahmoun, who was arrested on 23 August in Hama.- Tarek Said Balsha, a photographer arrested in Latakia on 19 August. There has been no news of him since then.- Muhammed Nihad Kurdiyya, a mechanical engineer who was arrested in Latakia on 18 August as he was about to be interviewed by Al-Jazeera.- Adel Walid Kharsah, a reporter who was arrested while covering demonstrations in Deraa on 17 August.- Olwan Zouaiter, a journalist who has written for many Lebanese dailies. He was arrested by intelligence officials in the northern city of Raqqah on 16 March after returning from Libya. He was initially sentenced to five years in prison for allegedly contacting the Syrian opposition while abroad. The sentence was subsequently reduced to 13 months. He is serving it in Raqqah prison.According to rumours circulating since 10 February, the detained writer and opposition activist Hussein Issou died in detention and his body was taken to the morgue of the military hospital in Damascus. A war of information or disinformation about his fate has been waged since then. Issou was originally arrested on 3 September in the northeastern city of Al-Hassakah. Reporters Without Borders has urged the Syrian authorities to shed light on the status. His family does not know if he is alive or dead.The status of these two persons is also of concern:- Moheeb Al-Nawaty, a Palestinian journalist who had lived in Norway since 2007. He went missing on 5 January 2011, nine days after arriving in Damascus. He is a Fatah member and used to work for the website of the satellite TV station Al-Arabiya.- Tal Al-Mallouhi, a 19-year-old student and blogger who has been detained since December 2009. She was brought before a state security court in Damascus for the second time on 17 January 2011. Reportedly accused of spying for the United States, she is being held in Duma prison, near Damascus. Internet users all over the world have been calling for her release. News Wave of Kurdish arrests of Syrian journalists Related documents Authorities threaten foreign media, continue to arrest Syrian journalists and bloggers – Arabic versionPDF – 52.6 KB March 8, 2021 Find out more to go furthercenter_img SyriaMiddle East – North Africa Follow the news on Syria Receive email alerts March 12, 2021 Find out more February 3, 2021 Find out more March 13, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Authorities threaten foreign media, continue to arrest Syrian journalists and bloggers Organisation News Damascus TV presenter arrested under cyber-crime law Newslast_img read more

first_img January 31, 2019 2,726 Views  Print This Post The Challenges of Obtaining Mortgage Payment Assistance The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Troubles with receiving periodic mortgage statements, wrong data on statements, and challenges associated with getting mortgage loan assistance are some of the major mortgage-related complaints made by consumers according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB’s) latest snapshot of mortgage complaints.The CFPB said that it had received around 71,000 mortgage complaints between November 1, 2016, and October 31, 2018. While a majority of these complaints (85 percent) were sent to the companies for review and response, the bureau said that the remaining complaints, around 11 percent, where the CFPB did not have the primary complaint handling responsibility were sent to other regulatory agencies.Of all the mortgage-related complaints that were received by the CFPB, 50 percent were related to conventional home mortgage loans. FHA mortgages made up 13 percent while other types of mortgage products made up 25 percent of the complaints received.Among borrowers looking at mortgage loan payment assistance, the complaints against mortgage servicers were related to disagreement or confusion over the servicer’s denial of their request for a loan modification. Other consumers who complained about problems with loan modifications reported to the CFPB that their single point of contact at the servicer was unresponsive or that they had to respond to multiple document requests.Some borrowers described the communications they received from their servicer about loan assistance as confusing, the snapshot indicated. These consumers reported being uncertain about the requirements to continue the assistance process.Consumers also complained about trouble during the payment process. This included issues with receiving periodic statements on time that resulted in a lack of information about the application of payments to a borrower’s loan or about the loan’s current status. The CFPB report indicated that some borrowers also attributed a missing statement to a recent transfer of servicing of the loan. Inaccurate data in the periodic statements was another source of problems that borrowers complained about to the CFPB and included wrong account information such as late fees assessed to a borrower’s loan despite payments made on or before the due date.The snapshot also indicated that consumers complained about servicers not applying payments to their loan account as intended, with some complaints highlighting that despite submitting extra payments with instructions to apply those to the principal, they were either misapplied or held in an unapplied funds account or applied only after their inquiry with the servicer.Click here to read the full report. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / The Challenges of Obtaining Mortgage Payment Assistance Share Save Borrowers CFPB consumers Lenders Loan Assistance Loan Modification loans mortgage payment Servicers statements 2019-01-31 Radhika Ojha Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Tagged with: Borrowers CFPB consumers Lenders Loan Assistance Loan Modification loans mortgage payment Servicers statements Related Articlescenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Radhika Ojha Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News, Servicing Previous: Who is FHFA’s New Chief of Staff? Next: Top 25 Women of Law, Part 3 Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

first_img Google+ Pinterest Twitter Google+ Facebook Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Twitter Pinterest 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic center_img People who add extensions to their homes will have to pay extra property tax The Finance Minister says people who invest in their homes by adding extensions may have to pay extra property tax.The new tax which comes into effect later this year will be self-assessed, but based on the value of the property.Responding to questions in the Dáil, the Finance Minister said if an owner increases the value of their property by building on, then they will be liable for extra tax:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/17noon1.mp3[/podcast] News 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North By News Highland – January 16, 2013 Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsApp Previous articleMEP Pat the Cope Gallagher reacts to Taoiseach’s address to the European ParliamentNext articleTest results in horse meat controversy due today News Highland WhatsApp Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

first_img “I’ve got to go tell Daddy,” Uncle James said as he started across the road to my granddaddy’s house with me right behind him.Pop was sitting in his chair in the den. Uncle James went over and put his hand on Pop’s shoulder to deliver the bad news, “Williams lost in the woods.”Pop was hard of hearing so he didn’t react. Uncle James said in a much louder voice, “William’s lost in the woods!”“I saw him up town a little while ago,” Pop said. The day before Thanksgiving, Mama and I went to Eufaula to bring my granny to our house for Thanksgiving. When we drove back in the yard at near dark, tall uncle was silhouetted in the light of the screen door as he went up the steps.  He turned and came back down the steps and hurriedly met us as we were getting out of the car.“I have bad news,” he said. “William is missing in the woods.”At those words, Mama went all to pieces, as she often did. She started crying and going around in tight little circles in the yard with my granny moaning and making bigger circles around her.In her distress, Mama probably didn’t hear Uncle James say that some cows were lost on the way-back-forty and he and Daddy went looking for them. Daddy didn’t come back to the truck at the appointed time. Uncle James looked for a while before he rounded up men to help look for Daddy but they had not been able to find him. So, he had come into town to get the National Guard to join the search. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Latest Stories Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Print Article Published 3:00 am Saturday, November 19, 2016 What I remember most about Thanksgiving when I was growing up was eating dinner in my grandmother’s big, dining room, sitting with a napkin and my hands on my lap and eating boiled custard for dessert.Thanksgiving is a special day for families to come together to give thanks for all their many blessings and we did that.But, one Thanksgiving that stands clear in my mind is the year that we almost didn’t have Daddy at the dinner table. By Jaine Treadwell By The Penny Hoarder Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Email the author Sponsored Content “He’s lost!”“I saw him up town.” Back and forth they went. Finally, Uncle James stormed out of the house with me right behind him.In a thought, Uncle James stopped right in the middle of the road. He must have been thinking what I was thinking. He took off toward the house, rushing right past Mama and my granny who had slumped down on the steps, still crying and moaning.I was right behind him.Now, I’m not going to repeat what Uncle James said at the sight of Daddy sitting in his easy chair, eating Planter’s Salted Peanuts right out of the can and watching Perry Mason on the black and white television set.What I will say is that Daddy had gotten tired of looking for the cows, walked out of the woods and caught a ride into town.Daddy made it to Thanksgiving dinner. He and Uncle James didn’t talk to each other. Mama and my granny had cried out. I just sat with my hands and my napkin on my lap and ate boiled custard for dessert. Skip You Might Like Trump’s upset victory shames media Donald J. Trump’s election to the presidency left the pollsters and pundits from every media outlet and news network with… read more When Daddy came to Thanksgiving Book Nook to reopenlast_img read more

first_img Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Print Article Sponsored Content The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Lawrence Bowden, president of the Brundidge Historical Society, producer of the folk life play, said “Come Home, It’s Suppertime,” is in its 18 year of production and this year is uniquely special.“This is Alabama’ bicentennial year and our folk life play is set during one of the most difficult times in our nation’s history and in Alabama’s,” Bowden said. “The Great Depression’s impact on Alabama lasted throughout the 1930s and, for many, into the early 1940s and that was longer than the nation as a whole.”Bowden said during the Depression people had to depend on each in an effort to make it through the hard times.“Our folk life play takes a hard look at the Great Depression era,” he said. “It tells the story of hard times and those who lived them. It’s humorous and heartfelt. The stories are all true as told by those who lived them right here in our community.” Latest Stories Tickets are now on sale for the fall production of Alabama’s Official Folk Life Play,“Come Home, It’s Suppertime” at the We Piddle Around Theater in Brundidge.Play dates are November 7, 8 & 9 and 14, 15 & 16. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Tickets are $25 and include the pre-show, a full country supper with dessert andthe award-winning, original two-act folk life play.For tickets call 334-685-5524. Email the author By Jaine Treadwell Bowden said many of those who come the folk life play will remember hard times or stories of those times that bound together people from all walks of life. Some will come who know little about the Great Depression but, if they listen closely to the heart of the play, they will have a better understanding of hard times and those who endured them.”Bowden said those who endured and survived the Great Depression, did, as is revealed in the play, turned their hands to work and their hearts to God.And that same work ethic has sustained Alabama and its people for 200 years. Tickets on sale for ‘Come Home it’s Suppertime’ By The Penny Hoarder You Might Like Conecuh Ridge Distillery property rezoned A property planned to be the site of the Conecuh Ridge Distillery has been rezoned to the Tourism Development District,… read more Skip Published 3:00 am Wednesday, October 23, 2019last_img read more

first_imgBirmingham Police Department(NEW YORK) — A 44-year-old Alabama father and husband with 16 years of experience. A 22-year-old California woman just weeks into the job.Seven law enforcement officers were killed in the United States in the first two weeks of this year — representing “seven shattered families, seven local communities that are grieving and seven work forces grieving and trying to compensate for having lost an officer,” said Steve Groeninger, a spokesman for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.But Groeninger said that statistic is, unfortunately, not unusual.Four officers died in the first two weeks of 2018, half as many as the eight fatalities over that period in 2017, he said.In 2016, only one officer was lost in that time.“It ebbs and flows,” Groeninger said, adding that he was a little surprised with how violent this year started. He was hopeful “we had turned a page.”But Groeninger said that statistic is, unfortunately, not unusual.Four officers died in the first two weeks of 2018, half as many as the eight fatalities over that period in 2017, he said.In 2016, only one officer was lost in that time.“It ebbs and flows,” Groeninger said, adding that he was a little surprised with how violent this year started. He was hopeful “we had turned a page.”‘We lost a brother’Some of these seven killings were especially brutal.When 22-year-old Davis, California, police officer Natalie Corona was ambushed and shot dead on Jan. 10, the shooter unloaded an entire magazine, even after she had fallen to the ground, according to police. “She was just an absolute star in the department,” said Davis Police Chief Darren Pytel. “Someone that pretty much every department member looked to as a close friend, a sister.”In Arizona, the killing of a Salt River Police officer appears to have been accidental.Officer Clayton Townsend, a young father, was conducting a traffic stop on Jan. 8 when he was struck and killed by a distracted driver who was allegedly texting, according to Arizona Department of Public Safety officials.And in Louisiana, the Jan. 9 slaying of Shreveport police officer Chateri Payne appears to have been unrelated to her profession.Payne was in uniform, heading to work before the start of her shift, when she was shot dead, allegedly by her live-in boyfriend, authorities said Wednesday.Payne, a 22-year-old mother, had been working as an officer for less than two months at the time of her death.“We may never know whether Officer Payne’s chosen profession contributed to her death, but we do know a uniformed police officer was killed moments before beginning her shift,” Shreveport Police Chief Ben Raymond said.The seventh fatality of the year came Sunday morning when Birmingham police Sgt. Wytasha Carter was gunned down while responding to car burglaries.The slain sergeant was a 44-year-old father and husband. A “natural-born leader,” he had 16 years of law enforcement experience, Birmingham Police Chief Patrick Smith told reporters Sunday with tears in his eyes.“Everybody is just hurt right now,” said Carter’s supervisor, Lt. Shelia Finney. “We lost a brother.”A ‘dangerous, stressful environment’Hours after Carter was killed, police chiefs voiced their outrage over the growing fatalities.“The level of violence directed at the police in the first few days of 2019 is alarming,” Arlington, Texas, police chief Will Johnson tweeted Sunday. Steve Dye, police chief in Grand Prairie, Texas, added Monday, “Our society needs to collectively wake up and stand against the lack of hesitancy to kill or attempt to kill those who protect this country from chaos and disorder.”“In my time as chief of detectives I investigated six deaths of police officers in the line of duty,” said former New York Police chief of detectives Robert Boyce, now an ABC News contributor. “It’s the worst thing you can do because you see yourself in them. … These men and women put their lives on the line each day.”John Cohen, a former acting undersecretary at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and current ABC News contributor, called the seven back-to-back deaths a “dangerous, stressful environment for law enforcement officers to operate in.”That, combined with the fact that the overall number of law enforcement deaths in 2018 increased from 2017, has left officers “very concerned about the impact that this trend will have on police officer safety and mental health,” Cohen said.“The challenge here is that if you’re operating in an environment where you know that acts of violence against police officers have increased, you’re going to respond to day-to-day situations in a more cautious, and maybe even reactive, way,” Cohen said.Officers may be more assertive when giving instructions, or react more quickly to perceived threatening movements, Cohen explained, and “the concern is that in doing that, situations may escalate and actually turn into confrontations [between police and the public] that in the past wouldn’t.”‘The public needs to be aware’To Cohen, public education is a step in the right direction.“The public needs to be aware that increasingly police officers are on the receiving end of violent attacks,” he said. “They should also understand why police officers do what they do.”For example, he said, a driver pulled over for speeding may feel an officer walking over with his hand on his gun is “excessive,” but from that officer’s perspective, it’s “rational,” because he’s working in an environment where there’s an increased threat to his safety.“It also points to the importance of strong, trusting relationships between law enforcement professionals and community members,” Cohen said, suggesting departments “don’t wait until a situation becomes violent to form those relationships.”Despite the ever-present threat, Boyce said the possibly of violence doesn’t deter officers on the streets each day.“It’s not something that weighs too heavily on you, because you won’t be able to do your job,” Boyce said.“You live with that and you know it,” Boyce said, and aided by training and equipment, “you go to work anyway and do your job anyway.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.,Birmingham Police Department(NEW YORK) — A 44-year-old Alabama father and husband with 16 years of experience. A 22-year-old California woman just weeks into the job.Seven law enforcement officers were killed in the United States in the first two weeks of this year — representing “seven shattered families, seven local communities that are grieving and seven work forces grieving and trying to compensate for having lost an officer,” said Steve Groeninger, a spokesman for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund.But Groeninger said that statistic is, unfortunately, not unusual.Four officers died in the first two weeks of 2018, half as many as the eight fatalities over that period in 2017, he said.In 2016, only one officer was lost in that time.“It ebbs and flows,” Groeninger said, adding that he was a little surprised with how violent this year started. He was hopeful “we had turned a page.”But Groeninger said that statistic is, unfortunately, not unusual.Four officers died in the first two weeks of 2018, half as many as the eight fatalities over that period in 2017, he said.In 2016, only one officer was lost in that time.“It ebbs and flows,” Groeninger said, adding that he was a little surprised with how violent this year started. He was hopeful “we had turned a page.”‘We lost a brother’Some of these seven killings were especially brutal.When 22-year-old Davis, California, police officer Natalie Corona was ambushed and shot dead on Jan. 10, the shooter unloaded an entire magazine, even after she had fallen to the ground, according to police. “She was just an absolute star in the department,” said Davis Police Chief Darren Pytel. “Someone that pretty much every department member looked to as a close friend, a sister.”In Arizona, the killing of a Salt River Police officer appears to have been accidental.Officer Clayton Townsend, a young father, was conducting a traffic stop on Jan. 8 when he was struck and killed by a distracted driver who was allegedly texting, according to Arizona Department of Public Safety officials.And in Louisiana, the Jan. 9 slaying of Shreveport police officer Chateri Payne appears to have been unrelated to her profession.Payne was in uniform, heading to work before the start of her shift, when she was shot dead, allegedly by her live-in boyfriend, authorities said Wednesday.Payne, a 22-year-old mother, had been working as an officer for less than two months at the time of her death.“We may never know whether Officer Payne’s chosen profession contributed to her death, but we do know a uniformed police officer was killed moments before beginning her shift,” Shreveport Police Chief Ben Raymond said.The seventh fatality of the year came Sunday morning when Birmingham police Sgt. Wytasha Carter was gunned down while responding to car burglaries.The slain sergeant was a 44-year-old father and husband. A “natural-born leader,” he had 16 years of law enforcement experience, Birmingham Police Chief Patrick Smith told reporters Sunday with tears in his eyes.“Everybody is just hurt right now,” said Carter’s supervisor, Lt. Shelia Finney. “We lost a brother.”A ‘dangerous, stressful environment’Hours after Carter was killed, police chiefs voiced their outrage over the growing fatalities.“The level of violence directed at the police in the first few days of 2019 is alarming,” Arlington, Texas, police chief Will Johnson tweeted Sunday. Steve Dye, police chief in Grand Prairie, Texas, added Monday, “Our society needs to collectively wake up and stand against the lack of hesitancy to kill or attempt to kill those who protect this country from chaos and disorder.”“In my time as chief of detectives I investigated six deaths of police officers in the line of duty,” said former New York Police chief of detectives Robert Boyce, now an ABC News contributor. “It’s the worst thing you can do because you see yourself in them. … These men and women put their lives on the line each day.”John Cohen, a former acting undersecretary at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and current ABC News contributor, called the seven back-to-back deaths a “dangerous, stressful environment for law enforcement officers to operate in.”That, combined with the fact that the overall number of law enforcement deaths in 2018 increased from 2017, has left officers “very concerned about the impact that this trend will have on police officer safety and mental health,” Cohen said.“The challenge here is that if you’re operating in an environment where you know that acts of violence against police officers have increased, you’re going to respond to day-to-day situations in a more cautious, and maybe even reactive, way,” Cohen said.Officers may be more assertive when giving instructions, or react more quickly to perceived threatening movements, Cohen explained, and “the concern is that in doing that, situations may escalate and actually turn into confrontations [between police and the public] that in the past wouldn’t.”‘The public needs to be aware’To Cohen, public education is a step in the right direction.“The public needs to be aware that increasingly police officers are on the receiving end of violent attacks,” he said. “They should also understand why police officers do what they do.”For example, he said, a driver pulled over for speeding may feel an officer walking over with his hand on his gun is “excessive,” but from that officer’s perspective, it’s “rational,” because he’s working in an environment where there’s an increased threat to his safety.“It also points to the importance of strong, trusting relationships between law enforcement professionals and community members,” Cohen said, suggesting departments “don’t wait until a situation becomes violent to form those relationships.”Despite the ever-present threat, Boyce said the possibly of violence doesn’t deter officers on the streets each day.“It’s not something that weighs too heavily on you, because you won’t be able to do your job,” Boyce said.“You live with that and you know it,” Boyce said, and aided by training and equipment, “you go to work anyway and do your job anyway.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. 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first_imgWABC-TV(NEW YORK) — A newborn with the umbilical cord still attached has been found dead, lying on the ground in a vacant lot, police said.The discovery was made Tuesday night in Port Jervis, New York, which is about 90 miles from New York City and near where Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York intersect. At about 10:30 p.m., officers responded to a report of a dead infant in a vacant lot, according to the Port Jervis Police Department. The baby “appeared to have been born recently” and had its umbilical cord attached, said police.Authorities identified and interviewed the baby’s mother but her name has not been released because the investigation is ongoing, police said Wednesday.An autopsy was conducted on Wednesday and “detectives are awaiting results of toxicology and further testing,” said police.Police ask anyone with information to call the Port Jervis Police Department at 845-856-5101.The police department added that it asks “the public to keep the young infant in their thoughts and prayers.”Every state has Safe Surrender or Safe Haven laws, though they differ by state, including how much time after birth a parent or guardian has to surrender the child. In 32 states, parents or guardians have 30 days to relinquish the child, Damien Johnson, director of communications of the National Safe Haven Alliance, told ABC News last month.Laws also differ on which locations are considered safe havens. In every state, a hospital is a safe location. Some states also allow a child to be taken to a fire station or police station, said Johnson.The first Safe Haven law was enacted in Texas in 1999, and since then all states as well as Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico have passed Safe Haven legislation, saving over 4,000 babies, according to the National Safe Haven Alliance. There is no federal legislation, Johnson said.You can reach the toll-free crisis hotline at 1-888-510-BABY or get information on your state by clicking the map here at nationalsafehavenalliance.org.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

first_imgKTRK-TV(NASSAU BAY, Texas) — The mayor of Nassau Bay, Texas, is calling it a “nightmare scenario” after a police sergeant was killed Tuesday night when a suspect she was trying to arrest struck her with his vehicle.Sgt. Kaila Sullivan, 43, was one of several officers performing a traffic stop on a vehicle at an apartment complex in Nassau Bay, southeast of Houston, police said.When officers determined that the suspect was wanted on a warrant for assaulting a family member, they moved to arrest him.The suspect began fighting with the officers, then broke free and got back into his vehicle, Nassau Bay police Chief Tim Cromie told reporters in a late-night press conference.The suspect then struck Sullivan as he was driving away, Cromie said.Sullivan was taken by ambulance to HCA Clear Lake Hospital, where she died from her injuries.“This a nightmare scenario for our city,” said Nassau Bay Mayor Mark Denman, who said it was the first time a Nassau Bay officer had even been seriously injured or killed in the line of duty. “We’re a very safe city and I know we’ll catch the suspect.”The suspect appeared to have abandoned his vehicle near the scene of the traffic stop, and was now the subject of a multiple-agency search, police said.Sullivan would have marked her 16th anniversary with the Nassau Bay Police Department on Dec. 27, according to Cromie.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more