first_imgzoom The world’s first electric car and passenger ferry powered by batteries – the MF Ampere – has entered service in Norway. The ferry’s owner Norled has started operating the electric vessel on a route across Sognefjord between Lavik and Oppedal. The fully electric ferry travels six kilometers across the fjord 34 times a day, with each trip taking around 20 minutes.The ferry, which is 80 meters long and 20 meters wide, is driven by two electric motors, each with an output of 450 kilowatts. It is made exclusively of light aluminum, which makes it only half as heavy as a conventional ferry, despite its ten ton batteries and a capacity for 360 passengers and 120 vehicles.Built in conjunction with shipbuilder Fjellstrand, Siemens installed the complete electric propulsion system and put up charging stations with lithium-ion batteries which are charged from hydro power. With the switch to battery, Norled is reducing the cost of fuel by up to 60 percent, according to Siemens.The ferry is powered by three batteries, one lithium-ion battery on board the ferry, and one at each pier to serve as a buffer. The 260-kWh-units supply electricity to the ferry while at anchor. Afterward, the battery slowly recoups all of this energy from the grid until the ship comes back again to drop off passengers and recharge. The ship’s onboard batteries are recharged directly from the grid at night when the ferry is not in use.The Norled ferry will use around two million kWh per year, whereas a traditional diesel ferry burns at least one million liters of diesel a year and emits 570 tons of carbon dioxide and 15 metric tons of nitrogen oxides, according to Siemens.On board the ferry, Siemens installed its electric propulsion system BlueDrive PlusC. It includes a battery and steering system, thruster control for the propellers, an energy management system and an integrated alarm system. The integrated automation systems control and monitor the machineries and auxiliaries on the ferry and are connected via Profibus to all other subsystems.last_img read more

OTTAWA — An alliance of First Nations leaders is preparing to fight proposed new pipelines both in the courts and through unspecified direct action.Native leaders from both Canada and the United States were on Parliament Hill on Wednesday to underline their opposition to both the Northern Gateway and Keystone XL pipelines.[np_storybar title=”With First Nations envoy, Tories aim to divide and conquer on energy projects” link=”https://business.financialpost.com/2013/03/19/tories-aim-to-divide-conquer-with-envoy-who-will-canvas-first-nations-on-energy-projects/?__lsa=62d2-4972″%5DThere is no deadlier combination for resources developers than opposition from a joint front of environmentalists and First Nations.In what appears to be a divide-and-conquer strategy, Prime Minister Stephen Harper named a special representative Tuesday to investigate first hand why First Nations in British Columbia are so opposed to energy infrastructure projects, including the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline.Continue reading . . . [/np_storybar]The first would tie the Alberta oil sands to the West Coast, while the second would send bitumen to refineries on the American Gulf Coast.Some of the chiefs brushed off the federal government’s appointment this week of a special envoy to look at tensions between natives and the energy industry.Vancouver-based lawyer Doug Eyford is to focus on energy infrastructure in Western Canada, but some native leaders say he has no credibility.He is to examine First Nations concerns about the troubled Northern Gateway proposal, as well as the development of liquid natural gas plants, marine terminals and other energy infrastructure in British Columbia and Alberta.He will discuss environmental protection, jobs and economic development, and First Nations rights to a share of the wealth from natural resources.Some native chiefs, however, said Eyford has already failed. Although he is also the federal government’s chief negotiator on comprehensive land claims, they said he hasn’t accomplished much on that file.Chief Allan Adam of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation said natives are determined to block the pipelines.“It’s going to be a long, hot summer,” he said at a news conference.“We have a lot of issues at stake.”Phil Lane Jr. of the American Yankton Sioux, said native groups south of the border will stand with their Canadian cousins.“We’re going to stop these pipelines on way or another,” he said.Chief Martin Louie of the Nadleh Whut’en First Nation in northern B.C., said the pipeline opponents will never back down.“If we have to keep going to court, we’ll keep doing that,” he said.He said the stakes are high and go beyond native issues.“We’re the ones that’s going to save whatever we have left of this earth,” he said.Chief Reuben George of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation on Vancouver Island said it’s time to act against the federal government’s resource development agenda.“We, as a nation, have to wake up,” he said. “We have to wake up to the crazy decisions that this government’s making to change the world in a negative way.” read more