Furthermore, according to the Asian Tribune, Ambassador R.K.M.A Rajakaruna has been nominated as the Ambassador designate for the new Sri Lankan Mission in the Kingdom of Bahrain. He has already left Chennai where he was Deputy High Commissioner succeeding Ambassador V. Krishnamoorthy. Asian Tribune learnt that he is waiting for the final clearance from Bahrain and it is expected that the new Sri Lanka Mission in Bahrain will be opened up shortly no sooner Mr. Rajakaruna takes up the appointment.In the meantime Ambassador V. Krissnamoorthy has been nominated as Ambassador for Saudi Arabia and this was confirmed by Mr. Karunatilaka Amunugama, Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs. He succeeds Ambasssador Ahamed A. Jawad, who has been recalled immediately after the beheading of the Sri Lanka House Maid Rizana Nafeek. Sarath Dissanayaka, the former Director General of the Publicity Division of the External Affairs Ministry, has taken up the appointment as Sri Lanka’s Ambassador to Cuba and also accredited to Argentina.Sri Lanka’s former Permanent Representative to Geneva Ambassador Tamara Kunanayakam had earlier been appointed to the post but according to the Asian Tribune website she has now been “thrown to the wolves”. She was supposed to take over as Ambassador to Cuba but Asian Tribune learnt that for reasons not explained, she did not take up that appointment and she has faded off from the limelight. Already External Affairs Ministry has decided on the nomination A. L. Sabarullah Khan, as the Deputy High Commissioner to Chennai. He was formerly the Consul General for Jeddah and presently the Director of the Economic Affairs Division in the Ministry. read more

CALGARY — The Canadian Energy Research Institute says growth in oilsands production over the next 20 years is expected to be slower than previously forecast, despite falling project construction costs.In an update study, the Calgary-based think-tank says it expects total oilsands output to grow from about three million barrels per day in 2018 to between 4.1 million and 5.8 million bpd in 2039.In its reference or base case, CERI predicts bitumen crude output will grow by an average of 80,000 bpd or just over two per cent per year over the next 20 years, down from last year’s estimate of three per cent growth, to about 4.7 million bpd.It calculates overall capital spending will average $16.5 billion per year but notes risk factors including the recent tendency of the industry to defer or cancel projects, further success in cutting costs, uncertainty about Alberta’s 100-megatonne cap on sector greenhouse gas emissions and the unknown future of export oil pipelines.CERI says the slower growth will result in the industry staying well within the emissions cap, reaching 94 megatonnes by 2039 — under last year’s forecast, the cap would have been reached by 2030.It says the cost of building a new steam-driven oilsands project has fallen by 11 per cent to C$40.61 per barrel of production, while an expansion project’s cost has fallen by six per cent to C$27.60 per barrel.“At current (West Texas Intermediate) prices of around US$60 per barrel, these projects are decidedly economic,” the report notes.“The relative position of oilsands projects against other crude oils is comparatively competitive and, as oil prices are expected to increase, so will the profitability of oilsands projects.”The Canadian Press read more