first_imgAnn Curtis | The Observer Alumni Tim Gancer speaks with a participant in the 2017 Fall Career Expo.Planning for the Career Expo began last spring with choosing a date and reaching out to repeat employers and potential new employers, director of employer engagement LoriAnn Edinborough, said. The planning is a huge undertaking requiring organization of countless moving parts to ensure employers and students alike have a productive and rewarding experience.“A lot of the employers will say we offer one of the best career fairs around and I think we just want to make sure they have an unsurpassed experience while they’re here from our end of, you know, providing it for them,” Edinborough said.Edinborough said that due to the excessive heat expected for Wednesday evening, the dress code of the Expo has been switched to business casual attire to ensure a more comfortable experience. She also said one of the biggest developments this year is a new app, ND Career Expo.“With this career fair app, you can do a quick search, have a quick definition of what that company is and the industries that they’re seeking, so you have a little bit of a synopsis while you’re waiting,” Bridget Kibbe, director of undergraduate career services, said. “Then you can ask more of a strategic question instead of coming up and asking, ‘What do you do?’”On the student side of the planning, Kibbe said her team streamlined the way they did student preparation, switching from 30-minute appointments to resume reviews and workshops covering resume writing, general preparation and interview practice.“I think the big part is making sure we plan well in advance, and I think this year we certainly did a very good job in doing that,” Kibbe said. “We offered [workshops] across, you know, every day of the week, Monday through Thursday and on Friday and at different times, again, very well-attended, so that’s been a huge plus for us.”While some students may regard networking and trying to “sell themselves” to employers as their worst nightmare, Kibbe said that the career counselors work to dispel that view of the career fair in their meetings with students, urging students to instead focus on the valuable conversations they can have with alumni and employers.“We certainly want students to feel that if they have no idea what they want to do, this still is a great place to attend because it’s a discernment tool,” Kibbe said. “Just talking to alums who have probably been through this before themselves, you know, what was their career path, what did they get involved in on campus, what classes did they take, what activities.”Kibbe said all students, no matter where they are in their educations or career discernment process, should attend the career fair to begin to understand how the skills developed in their classes are preparing them for future careers.“It’s not about your major. It’s about your skill sets and what’s developed, so we don’t want students to feel like your major defines your career path,” Kibbe said. “For so many employers, it is about your competencies: your comfort level in communication, critical thinking skills, things like that.”Tags: career fair, Center for Career Development, Fall Career Expo Thousands of students will descend on Notre Dame Stadium this Wednesday evening for the annual Fall Career Expo. The Expo, which is the Center for Career Development’s largest career fair of the year, will take place from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. and includes representatives from 247 companies looking to hire students majoring in everything from English to biochemistry.“The Expo is open to all students — undergraduate, graduate, everybody’s welcome to attend,” Ryan Willerton, associate vice president of career and professional development.last_img read more

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Spence At the age of just 26, John was named CEO of an international Rockefeller foundation, overseeing projects in 20 countries and reporting directly to the Chairman of the Board, Winthrop … Web: johnspence.com Details I think best practices are often useless. I think benchmarking is really stupid. Actually, I think they’re both really stupid and useless … if they are done improperly. Many companies examine alleged best practices in an attempt to simply replicate the exact same processes and practices within their organization – even though the practices might be from a completely different industry and have little or nothing to do with how the other companies actually do business.On the other hand, I think it’s absolutely brilliant to study best practices and then determine specifically what ideas you can adapt, change, modify and then apply to get seriously positive results in your organization. I also think looking at best practices from other industries is essential because it gives you access to something called “the adjacent new.” That’s when you take a brand-new idea you have never seen before, introduce it to an idea you’re already familiar with – and hope the two of them get along and eventually have offspring: a brilliant new idea that did not exist before. That’s originality born out of creativity – that’s where strategic insight comes from.In anticipation of seeing many of you at NAFCU’s CEOs and Senior Executives Conference in Key West, Fla., this April, I sent out a survey to ask what prospective attendees would like me to cover during my session. The answer came back loud and clear: a “master class” on best practices. I’m going to assume you all would rather hear about the useful best practices than the stupid ones …So here’s my plan: I’m going to show you some of the newest ideas on strategy, innovation, competitive differentiation, member service, employee engagement and more. I am also going to reiterate some of the key fundamental ideas that have been around for decades and are still absolutely critical in running a successful organization. Then I’m going to challenge you to look at all of these ideas from multiple angles and figure out how to change them so they will work well for you and your credit union.Lastly, I’m going to do everything I can to encourage conference attendees to do much more networking than they typically do. That’s a lesson I’d like credit union executives to remember whether they’re at conferences or anywhere else. It is the single most important thing I’ve ever learned in my life: You become what you focus on, and you become similar to the people you surround yourself with. One of the keys to success is creating a huge network of bright, sharp, smart and talented people who are interested in your success – then go to them often and ask for help. There is no better place for a credit union executive to build a powerful and helpful network than at a conference like this, and I’m going to give folks lots of thought-provoking and challenging ideas to discuss and explore together.So if you have not yet made plans to join us in Key West, I strongly encourage you to do so – it’s going to be a wonderful event, with lots of great information and ideas and plenty of very talented and friendly people to connect with. I look forward to seeing you in April!last_img read more