first_imgFor more information, call Estes Reynolds at (706) 542-2574. Or e-mail him. Ironically, the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks forced the cancellation of a Sept. 13-14 workshop on a topic the attacks made even more important to shoppers: food safety. The workshop has been rescheduled. The American Meat Science Association’s “Improving Your Sanitation Program” for meat and poultry processors will now be Nov. 29-30. It’s set for the Georgia Center for Continuing Education on the University of Georgia campus in Athens, Ga.The two-day, comprehensive workshop will begin at 7:45 a.m. Nov. 29. It will fill two full days with timely classes, ending around 5 p.m. Nov. 30. The comprehensive course was developed in cooperation with Virginia Tech and UGA food scientists.The course is designed for anyone responsible for meat or poultry processing plant sanitation, including quality control supervisors, HACCP coordinators, plant engineers and production managers.A $395 fee covers the course materials, a reception Thursday evening, two luncheons and refreshment breaks. Preregistration is required before Nov. 16. Just get a form off the Web and fax it to (706) 542-9066.last_img read more

first_imgVermont Technical College,Dr Philip A Conroy, Jr this week will begin his tenure as President of Vermont Technical College. He was appointed by the Vermont State College’s Board of Trustees earlier this year following a nationwide presidential search. Conroy comes to Vermont Tech from Mount Ida College in Newton, Massachusetts, where he served as vice president of enrollment management and marketing.But while he and his wife, Dr Jan Conroy, have yet to move into the president’s house, Conroy is no stranger to Vermont Tech. Following his appointment December 9th, he quickly formed a 20-plus member presidential transition team representing all areas of the college with which he’s been working to identify the college’s needs and priorities, as well as establish new directions the college will take under his guidance and leadership.Traditionally a two-year technical school offering a handful of baccalaureate degrees, Conroy’s long-term vision is to transform Vermont Tech into a ‘destination’ school offering primarily bachelor’s and, in time, even a few master’s degrees.‘I am intrigued by the vast potential Vermont Tech has to evolve into an ‘applied university’,” he said. ‘Through partnerships statewide with businesses, community leaders, and other institutions, I see the college evolving from its roots as an associate degree institution to a recognized and well-respected bachelor’s degree institution serving both Vermont and the greater New England region. I believe there are some exciting and intriguing times ahead for Vermont Tech.’Conroy, who has served in a variety of roles at Mount Ida since 1997, is an internationally recognized expert on higher education management, particularly in the areas of strategic enrollment management and institutional advancement ‘ specialties that will serve him well given Vermont’s current economic climate and plummeting high school enrollments.‘The challenges posed by the declining numbers of high school students graduating from northern New England high schools are many,’ Conroy said, ‘as are the financial realities of operating a public college in a state with limited financial resources. As I look ahead, however, I see Vermont Tech becoming an example of how strong an institution can be with a profound commitment to its public mission despite limited public funding.’Among Conroy’s first priorities will be rebuilding the college’s alumni and development offices and improving the quality of on-campus student life. He will also be working with his transition team to plan a statewide event this fall, where he will begin reaching out to business and community leaders to discuss the potential roles Vermont Tech could play in helping to build, support, and assist the state on a number of levels.‘Clearly we have our work cut out for us,’ Conroy said. ‘But the pieces are in place. We have the people, programs, and expertise to get it done. Now starts the difficult but extremely rewarding process of raising the college’s profile and enhancing its reputation throughout Vermont and across the region.’last_img read more

first_imgEditors note: As I finished this post, something seemed familiar. Well, there was a reason. I wrote about this day before. I thought about scratching it and starting over, but I looked back at the day a bit differently this time. I hope you don’t mind. 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »center_img by: Anthony  DemangoneHe was struggling.Our best 11-year-old pitcher was on the mound. But he has lost his touch. And as the pitches soared this way and that, I could see his frustration grow.He loaded the bases with walks.And then I heard it.“Just throw strikes.”That was the head coach. And he didn’t say “just throw strikes.”  He growled it.Four more pitches. Four more balls.He walked in a run. I’ve pitched before, and there’s no worse feeling than losing control. I saw the pitcher’s head drop.“Just throw strikes,” bellowed the coach.I was the assistant coach that season.‘Let me handle it,” I said.last_img read more