first_imgNicholas ‘The Axeman’ Walters, the Jamaican boxing star, is learning the hard way that although he can knock out opponents on a regular basis, (he has done so 21 times in 27 fights), it is much more difficult to win a negotiating battle with 84-year-old, Bob Arum.Arum is the head of Top Rank, one of the most successful boxing promoting companies in the world.For the past year, a fight between Walters, who until recently held the World Boxing Association (WBA) featherweight super title and Vasyl Lomachenko, the World Boxing Organization (WBO) featherweight champion, has been one of the talking points in boxing circles.The plot one heard from time to time was for Walters and Lomachenko to meet different boxers on the same fight card, and presuming that both fighters won, they would then move into a mega clash with each other.Things took an unlikely turn, however, when Walters lost his title on the scales at the Madison Square Garden weigh-in on June 12, 2015, for a fight scheduled for the next day against Miguel Marriaga.He won that fight convincingly, but the all-important title was no longer his, and this weakened his bargaining power in the negotiations.December 19 drawOn December 19 last year in his next fight, this time as a super featherweight (130 pounds) against Jason Sosa, he ended up with a draw decision. The consensus was that he did win that fight, but the records speak loudly, and his bargaining power again dropped a notch.Promoter Arum decided to fast-forward the proposed Walters versus Lomachenko fight and negotiations started. There was, however, a difference with those negotiations. Instead of being carried out by his long-time manager, Jacques Deschamps, Walters himself took over.There has been some unease in his camp, because Walters was of the view that his purse for the Nonito Donaire title fight was not enough.Deschamps told The Gleaner that it was in fact lower than he would normally have gone for, but he took the strategic decision to accept what was offered, confident that Walters would win the title and boost his future bargaining and earning power.The mission was accomplished when Walters stopped Donaire in six rounds and became a super champion, but Walters was still unhappy and decided that he wanted to do his own negotiations.Information is that Walters did not do a good job with those subsequent negotiations. When the offer to fight Lomachenko came about, however, Walters decided to go for broke.Arum has stated publicly that the Walters demand to fight Lomachenko is for US$1million, a price he is not willing to pay. The Gleaner understands that Arum offered him US$550,000 instead, but Walters has refused that offer. They have been unable to come to any agreement, and last word is that Arum has moved on and is negotiating with WBO Super featherweight champion Roman Martinez to fight Lomachenko instead on June 11.The Gleaner has been unable to contact Walters for a comment as his telephone goes to voice mail and he has not responded to requests for a return call.His father, Job, told The Gleaner yesterday that he knows of the negotiations and he, too, believes that Walters is worth more than is being offered by Arum.He is, however, hopeful that regardless of what happens now, the fight will eventually take place.last_img read more

first_img February 1, 20192:16 PM ESTLast UpdatedFebruary 1, 20192:21 PM EST Filed under News Retail & Marketing Nike Inc. is facing pressure to recall one of its leading brands of sneakers after a customer launched an online petition alleging the design on its sole resembles the Arabic word for “Allah.”The petition said it was “appalling” to allow the name of god on Nike Air Max 270 shoes, which “will surely be trampled, kicked and become soiled with mud or even filth.” The customer, Saiqa Noreen, asked Nike to recall “this blasphemous and offensive shoe and all products with the design logo resembling the word Allah from worldwide sales immediately.”Image of the sole and the Arabic word for Allah from the online petition. Bloomberg News 7 Comments Comment Share this storyNike faces demand for sneaker recall because logo on sole said to resemble the Arabic word for Allah Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Email Thomas Kutty Abraham Reddit Nike Inc. is facing pressure to recall one of its leading brands of sneakers.Bloomberg center_img Join the conversation → Twitter Screen shot Recommended For YouIEA says does not expect ‘huge increase’ in crude pricesChina, HK stocks track Asian market rally on U.S. rate-cut optimismDollar on back foot after Fed shores up bets on large rate cutChina’s refiners want tax cuts before making cleaner shipping fuel- sourcesGM’s mid-engine Corvettes roar onstage to take on Europeans More Nike said in a statement the logo was a stylized representation of the Air Max trademark. “Any other perceived meaning or representation is unintentional,” it said. “Nike respects all religions and we take concerns of this nature seriously.”The petition, which aims for 25,000 signatures, has been signed by more than 16,000 people. Gillette ad takes on ‘toxic masculinity’ in #MeToo-era rebrand Should you use political news as a basis to market your product? Trump says Nike getting ‘killed’ over Colin Kaepernick deal Nike ran into a similar problem in 1997. The Council on American-Islamic Relations protested the company’s logo on certain athletic shoes, saying it resembled the word “Allah” in Arabic script. Nike said at the time it regretted any misunderstanding, explaining that the logo was meant to look like flames and recalled a line of shoes.The world’s largest sportswear company also faced criticism last year for its ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick that had initially rattled investors but had little fallout eventually. The NFL quarterback-turned-activist sparked controversy for taking a knee during the national anthem in protest of police brutality and racial injustice.Bloomberg.com Facebook Nike faces demand for sneaker recall because logo on sole said to resemble the Arabic word for Allah Online petition attracts thousands of signatureslast_img read more