first_imgJames Rodriguez is confident that Colombia can reach either the semi-finals or the final of the upcoming World Cup in Russia this summerThe Bayern Munich loan star was one of the standout performers in the previous World Cup in Brazil as Colombia surged past Uruguay to reach the quarter-finals of the tournament for the first time in their history, before losing 2-1 to hosts Brazil in that round.Rodriguez, who also won Adidas Golden Boot award for his goal against Brazil, is confident that Colombia can build on the previous tournament and go even further in this summer’s World Cup.“I want to have a good World Cup and help my team-mates get to the semi-finals or the Final,” said the 26-year-old, according to FIFA.“Why not?”.James Rodriguez, Real MadridZidane hails ‘quality’ James Rodriguez after Real Madrid’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane reserved special praise for James Rodriguez after his starring role in Real Madrid’s 3-2 win over Levante.Colombia has been drawn in Group H, where they will face Japan, Poland and Senegal.But Rodrguez would not mind facing world champions Germany after the group stages of the tournament.“It would be great,” said Rodriguez.“But that’s a long way away – we need to take things step by step.”The midfielder is Colombia’s third all-time leading goalscorer on 21 goals behind Radamel Falcao (29) and Arnoldo Iguaran (25).last_img read more

first_imgHowever, hours fished with set gillnets in the Kasilof Section within 600 feet of shore do no apply to the weekly hourly provisions in the Kenai River Late-Run King Salmon Management Plan. The passage estimates of sockeye salmon are increasing in the Kasilof River. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Department of Fish and Game has announced the opening for set gillnetting in the Kasilof Section of the Upper Subdistrict within 600 feet of the mean high tide mark on the Kenai Peninsula shoreline from 5:00 p.m. until 11:59 p.m., today. According to the DF&G, more than 15,000 sockeye salmon are estimated to have passed the Kasilof River sockeye salmon sonar counter on July 17, and through 12:00 noon today.center_img According to Kenai River Late-Run King Salmon Management Plan, if the use of bait and the retention of king salmon is prohibited in the sport fishery, commercial fishing periods in the Upper Subdistrict set gillnet fishery, excluding the East Foreland Section, are open for no more than 24 hours per week, with a 36-hour continuous closure per week beginning between 7:00 p.m. Thursday and 7:00 a.m. Friday. On July 1,the Kenai River late-run king salmon sport fishery was restricted to no bait and on July 18, the sport fishery was further restricted to no retention in order to achieve the king salmon sustainable escapement goal.last_img read more

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Hilcorp announced a five year plan to continue conducting exploration and production activities in the Cook Inlet. According to the application the work is expected to span five years includes: 30 days of 2D seismic survey, 45-60 days of 3D seismic survey, geohazard surveys in the Outer Continenal Shelf (OCS) (30 days), middle Cook Inlet subseawall area (14 days), and Trading Bay (30 days), exploratory wells in the OCS (40-60 days per well, 2-4 wells annually for three years) and Trading Bay (120-150 days), Iniskin Peninsula exploration and development (180 days annually for two years), platform and pipeline maintenance (180 days annually for five years), middle Cook Inlet well abandonment (90 days), and Drift River terminal decommissioning (120 days). The proposed action may incidentally expose marine mammals occurring in the vicinity to sources of harassment, particularly through elevated levels of underwater sound in the marine environment, thereby resulting in incidental take, according to NMFS. NMFS invites the public to provide suggestions, and comments on the Hilcorp’s application and request. Public comments must be received no later than November 26. With that announcement the company was required to file an application for the incidental take of marine mammals with the National Marine Fisheries Service in the Cook Inlet. The MMPA states that the term “take” means to harass, hunt, capture, kill or attempt to harass, hunt, capture, or kill any marine mammal. Hilcorp owns and operates in over 29 oil and has field production facilities, including several located in Cook Inlet. The petition includes all four stages of oil and gas activities: Exploration, development, production, and decommissioning. Last month, Hilcorp, also submitted an application for an underground oil and gas lease for five parcels of Kenai Peninsula Borough land in Anchor Point.last_img read more

first_img Email Listen: Prince’s ‘Anthology: 1995-2010′ & 22 Other Albums Released Digitally Facebook News Twitter 23 Previously Unavailable Prince Albums Released listen-princes-anthology-1995-2010-22-other-albums-released-digitally Over 300 songs have been added to the iconic artist’s online catalog and are now available to stream and downloadAna YglesiasGRAMMYs Aug 20, 2018 – 3:41 pm Over 300 songs, totaling 23 albums, have been added to Prince’s digital catalog and are newly available to stream and download thanks to a recent deal between the late GRAMMY-winning artist’s Estate and Sony’s Legacy Recordings.The albums, including Anthology: 1995-2010, a new 37-track compilation created by the Prince Estate, are up on all major online music providers. This makes many of the recordings available digitally for the first time.Anthology begins with 1996’s “Emancipation,” from the album of the same name, which Prince referred to as his “most important record” – it was his first release following his breakup with Warner Bros. Records. Emancipation is also newly available digitally, as well as 2004’s Musicology, for which Prince received five nominations and two wins at the 47th GRAMMY Awards.The deal also gives Sony/Legacy the rights to release 12 more albums for the first time digitally, beginning in 2021. These albums, recorded by Prince from 1978-1996 while he was infamously under contract at Warner Bros., include the iconic GRAMMY nominated albums 1999 and Sign O’ The Times, the latter which was inducted into the GRAMMY Hall of Fame in 2017.A complete list of the newly released albums is available here.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read morelast_img read more

first_imgIndian’s state minister for external affairs MJ Akbar has said the Bangladesh government is committed to taking stern action against those who attacked Hindu minorities in the country.”The government of Bangladesh has made it clear that it takes these attacks very seriously and is committed to take [sic] stern action against perpetrators,” he said while responding to a question over attacks on minorities.In November last year, there were attacks committed on the Hindu villagers of Horkoli Thakurpara, Rangpur.The attackers burned down at least 30 Hindu houses following a Hindu youth had allegedly posted objectionable content relating to Islam on Facebook.MJ Akbar said in the lower house of India’s bicameral parliament on Wednesday that it is the responsibility of the government of Bangladesh and the government of Pakistan to discharge their obligations towards their respective citizens, including protection of their places of worship.”The government of India takes up the matter at a bilateral level, both with the government of Bangladesh and with the government of Pakistan,” he said.The questioner wanted to know whether there has been substantial increase in the incidents of attacks on minority Hindus living in neighbouring countries and whether the Indian government has formulated any action plan to express its resentment in this regard, according to the external affairs ministry.MJ Akbar said reports of attacks on members of minority communities in Bangladesh and Pakistan, including some incidents of forced conversion in Pakistan have come to the attention of the government.Information has been received from Bangladesh that some houses and a few temples of the Hindu community were also vandalised, he said.last_img read more

first_imgRajshahi district unit BNP general secretary Motiur Rahman Montu. Photo: CollectedA Rajshahi court on Tuesday placed Motiur Rahman Montu, general secretary of district unit BNP, on a five-day remand in a case filed over the crude bomb attack on a rally of the party’s mayoral candidate Mosaddek Hossain Bulbul, reports UNB.Rajshahi metropolitan magistrate Zahidul Islam passed the order when sub-inspector of Boalia police station and also the investigation officer of the case Golam Mostafa produced him before the court with seven-day remand prayer.Earlier on 22 July, police in a drive arrested Motiur Rahman Montu from his house in the city’s Ramchandrapur area around 2:30am following the leak of an audio clip over alleged conversation between Montu and another BNP leader regarding bomb attack on the rally.On 17 July, the rally of BNP candidate came under crude bomb attack in Sagorpara Bottolar Mor area around 11:00am.Later, sub-inspector Shamim Hossain of Boalia police station filed a case accusing eight unnamed people.last_img read more

first_imgRuhul Kabir Rizvi.File photoBNP on Sunday described prime minister Sheikh Hasina’s ‘tea party’ at Ganabhaban as pleasure without conscience and said no democracy-loving party leader joined it, reports UNB.”The tea party arrangement by a regretless government after a grand vote robbery reminds me a famous saying by Mahatma Gandhi ‘pleasure without conscience’. This pleasure is a social sin,” said BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi.Speaking at a press conference at BNP’s Naya Paltan central office, he also said the tea part by a ‘euphoric’ government formed through a ‘farcical’ election is tantamount to pleasure without conscience.”No democracy-loving party and those who are in a democratic movement didn’t join the event of sin committed by the government which betrayed the nation and looted people’s votes. This is the victory of people,” Rizvi said.Prime minister Sheikh Hasina hosted the tea party at her official residence Ganabhaban on Saturday for the leaders of political parties who had joined dialogues with her before the 11th general election.Leaders of all the political parties, except the Jatiya Oikya Front, including the BNP, and the Left Democratic Alliance (LDA), attended the tea party. Turning down the results of the 30 December election and bringing the allegation of vote robbery, Oikya Front and LDA demanded a fresh election.Rizvi said now there is no democracy in Bangladesh as the state is now under the grip of an individual and a party. “The people of Bangladesh have now become the slaves of the sate due to demolition of democracy.”He also alleged that the country’s ‘most popular’ leader Khaleda Zia has been kept in jail while thousands of BNP leaders and activists have been arrested in ‘false’ cases only to protect the one-party rule.He alleged that the government not only demonstrated a bizarre attitude but also mocked people by filing ‘fictitious’ cases against dead persons, paralysed patients and expatriates leaving in different countries.last_img read more

first_imgBimanThe managing director of Biman Bangladesh Airlines AM Masaddique Ahmed has been relieved of his duties, reports UNB.Civil aviation and tourism secretary Mohibul Haque confirmed it to UNB on Wednesday.He said Biman director (operation) captain Farhad Hasan Zamil will perform as acting managing director until a new MD is appointed.The decision was taken at a meeting of Biman managing committee on Tuesday night following allegations of irregularities and corruption in Biman, he said.A new managing director will be appointed within 15 June, he added.last_img

first_imgPeople who start their day with a heavy meal are more likely to weigh less, according to scientists who confirm the age-old adage that one should breakfast like a king and dine like a pauper. A study of 50,000 people found that those who made breakfast their largest meal of the day has a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than people who waited until supper, even when they ate a similar number of calories.Researchers from Loma Linda University School of Public Health in the US also found that extending the time between the final food of the day and breakfast was also associated with lower BMIs.”Eating a large breakfast reduces hunger cravings, especially for sweets and fats thus counteracting weight gain,” said Hana Kahleova, lead author of the study published in the Journal of Nutrition.”Regular breakfast consumption seems to increase satiety, reduce total energy intake, improve overall dietary quality, reduce blood lipid and improve insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance,” Kahleova said.”On the other hand, eating meals in the evening generally has the opposite effects, all of which adversely affect body weight,” she said.Scientists suggest maintain a healthy weight people should eat breakfast and lunch, skip supper, avoid snacks, make breakfast the largest meal of the day and fast for up to 18 hours a night.last_img read more

first_imgIndira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts raised the curtain for ARTH – Art for the earth on July 5 at the IGNCA, CV Mess, Janpath, New Delhi.The chief guest for the inauguration ceremony was the State Minister of culture, environment, forest and climate change, Dr Mahesh Sharma.The exhibition which is up for display until October 22 – is the first its kind public art project on the environment by one of India’s leading contemporary artists – Manav Gupta. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfComprising of “Excavations in Hymns of Clay”– a suite of environmental art installations by the artist, weaving all of them with a story-line and poetry. ‘Arth’ is an evolving, site-specific and dynamic engagement.As a public art project, the artist has tried to deploy the quintessentially Indian potter’s produce of clay objects such as the earthen lamps (diyas), local cigar (chilam), earthen cups (kullar), with the idea to transform their individual identity into metaphors and idioms of sustainability, context, perception and treatment. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe clay objects and other items displayed in the exhibition will stun the viewer with the artist’s originality of thought as he produces a cutting-edge contemporary language whose global vocabulary is derived from the “local”.Emotive content like that of an epic story, Manav’s statement is dipped gently into the essence of the Indian Vedic practices to subtly bring to light the repository of solutions that the ancient way of life could offer in today’s context of sustainable development and current issues around rivers like the Ganga. Whether it be the latest ‘Rain’ or the ‘River waterfront’ ‘Time Machine’, ‘Bee-hive Garden ‘, ‘River Bed of Love’, or the ‘Noah’s Ark’, the fragility of clay juxtaposed with the limitlessness of the “cup of life” question the paradigm of time and human engagement with it in today’s rapidly mechanized and constructed consumerist engagement with earth’s resources.The works, conceptualised, created and constructed by the artist while taking into consideration the venue – is a sensitive natural interface with the ambience, seeking to engage fresh and locally relevant dialogues and questions that audiences can have with the art and within themselves.last_img read more

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 Shares  life_in_a_pixel / Shutterstock.comJuly 29, 2014; NPR Blogs, “The Two-Way”A federal appeals court has decided in a 2–1 vote that a Mississippi law, H.B. 1390, which would have forced the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the state’s only abortion clinic, to close would pose an “undue burden” on women and thus was unconstitutional. If the clinic had closed, it would have made Mississippi the only state with no abortion facilities.“Pre-viability, a woman has the constitutional right to end her pregnancy by abortion,” Judge E. Grady Jolly wrote in the decision. “Mississippi may not shift its obligation to respect the established constitutional rights of its citizens to another state.” The law, however, would presumably apply if another clinic opened up in Mississippi.The 2012 law, which is very similar to laws passed in other states like Texas and Ohio, required abortion providers to have doctors on staff who had admitting privileges at local hospitals. And indeed the doctors at the Mississippi clinic duly applied for these privileges at seven hospitals, but were turned down. In Texas, a 5th Circuit panel upheld the law in a March decision and the law has halved the number of abortion clinics operating in Texas in that state over the past year.Meanwhile, three protestors who had been blocking the clinic’s entrance were found guilty on Monday—two for obstructing the sidewalk and one for interfering with a lawful business. They have also been barred from contacting the clinic or from using that sidewalk.—Ruth McCambridge ShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

first_imgRon Netolitzky, Bob Quartermain, Duane Poliquin, Ron Parratt, Ross Beaty, Jim O’Rourke Moderated by Louis James, Casey Research The following is a video recording of the Casey Research Explorers’ League panel – moderated by Louis James – at the Cambridge House Investment Conference in Vancouver, January 2012. Listen to the valuable information and guidance passed along by some of the most successful mineral explorers in the world… or read the transcript below. [Ron Netolitzky, Bob Quartermain, Duane Poliquin, Ron Parratt, Ross Beaty, and Jim O’Rourke are some of the “serially successful mine finders” that over the years have literally made fortunes for Casey Research subscribers. And now there’s a new generation of emerging natural resource giants that we are watching closely: The Casey NexTen – young professionals who already have remarkable successes under their belt… and a great future ahead of them. Learn who the NexTen are and why it could pay off big to start following them today. ] TRANSCRIPT Hosted by Louis James, Chief Metals and Mining Investment Strategist, Cambridge House Vancouver Investment Conference L: Thank you very much again for coming down. Welcome. Explorers’ League panel. As you may or may not know… how many people are subscribers? So mostly subscribers…. So, for those few of you who don’t know, the Explorers’ League is Casey Research’s way of honoring what we call the serially successful explorers in our business: the people who have found not just one economic mine but several, multiple times and mines on a scale that really matter, a million ounces plus of gold equivalent or better. So these guys are mine finders – a company by that name just got bought, but these are the guys that actually do it or have done it several times over. We’ve got Ron Netolitzky, we’ve got Bob Quartermain, we’ve got Duane Poliquin, and if I’ve got my heads right here, we’ve got Ron Parratt, Ross Beaty, and Jim O’Rourke, who just built the Copper Mountain Mine. That’s your fifth mine, Jim? Jim O’Rourke: Pardon? L: Copper Mountain is your fifth mine? You’ve lost track, you’ve built so many… fifth or sixth. Is it sixth? All right, onto the seventh in Gold Mountain. So anyway, these are the guys who have done it. These guys are, in our view, the best in the business. We are always having our doors open when they have a story to tell us, when they have a new project coming, we’re all ears, because these are the guys who know how to get it done and have done so repeatedly. So, I guess, we’ll just go down the row a little bit and take it one tranche at a time. Ron, if you can tell us what are you working on now, what’s happening now that you’re most keen to discuss and bring to people’s attention, and we’ll go back the other direction and talk about what’s coming next. Ron Netolitzky: My main work has been an “instant success” called Golden Band where we finally started pouring some gold; and now I’m hoping I can get away from operations and engineering and do what I really want to do in the belt, which is explore it for the deposits I haven’t found or our guys haven’t found. So that’s the main thing. I’m watching northwest BC; I think it’s exciting. We worked a bit in the Yukon through a company called Aben last year, and we were one of the few guys who at least had a drill success, but the market never appreciates it. I don’t think anybody made any money on Yukon stocks last year unless you sold early. L: Wait: before you give up the mic, tell us a little bit more about Golden Band – the symbol’s GBN. It was an agglomeration story. You had all these satellite deposits. You’ve got an old mill for a dollar or something like that, and you put it all together. Ron: Yes, it was a story that basically I got involved in the La Ronge Gold Belt in the early ’60s for an oil company, so I kind of knew it was there. And then I got into the uranium business, and then 1977 came along, Three Mile Island came along, and the next week, my consulting business wasn’t looking so hot anymore, so I started staking claims in the La Ronge Gold Belt. They ended up in a lot of joint ventures, a lot of other companies, one that disappeared off the board called Golden Rule. It got salted in Ghana – well after I left. And we got back into the La Ronge Gold Belt about 1994 with an associated mine called Komis. Klaus Lehnert-Thiel is VP of exploration, and it’s his till techniques that allowed us to find a whole bunch of new deposits and new discoveries. And we’re continuing with that game, and right now we’re mining one that’s unusual, and there are some samples at my booth called the EP Zone and we’ve got about 7,000 ounces in the glacial till running around 12 grams, so we’re now just mining into the source of that, and it’s definitely supergene enriched with chalcocite and native copper, which you aren’t supposed to get in the Shield, and the grade of that is getting – probably going to approach an ounce, and then we’ll get into some primary ore, but that whole thing was supposed to be 9,000 ounces, and I think at the start of the pit we’ve already probably got 9,000 ounces on the stockpile, so it’s been a lot of fun. L: Very good. So if you’re moving on from the engineering, then I guess… you’ll let us know when is the next Ron Netolitzky play for us to get involved in? Ron: Well, I think the next play is the same company. I think I got some excellent expiration targets to maybe find the deposits that are going to give the belt some respect. I think there’s natural evidence of a lot of bulk mineable targets there that people haven’t worried about and definitely we have proven that – and history has proven there are lots of small, high-grade narrow-vein systems there. But I think there’s opportunity for bigger deposits – low grade – that could be exciting. I am playing in northern BC, but frankly, I’m after a property. Until I get it, I wouldn’t bring anybody else in because it’s somebody I consider a little haywire that controls it. L: All right. Bob, everybody here probably knows or has heard about the Pretium story. We gave you an award – a Best of Show award – so I don’t want to repeat ourselves too much, but we got a question this morning maybe you can take on. The stock is trading at its all-time high. I mean it’s a new stock, but still it’s trading at its 52-week high, all-time high, whatever you want to call it. Can you persuade us that this is a good time to buy, or should we wait for a correction or what happens next with Pretium? Is there enough value added in the very-near term that it makes sense to buy Pretium at $16 right now? Bob Quartermain: Right. As you know, I came out of retirement last year to take on the Pretium opportunity; and we did it on the thesis that there would be a high-grade gold opportunity sitting in the much larger bulk tonnage mineralization. When you think about it, today we’ve outlined North America’s second-largest gold resource, 38 million ounces of measured Indicated resources, another 28 million ounces of Inferred, and within that we have now got about 8 million tonnes of mature running between 19 and 20 grams for about 5 million ounces. That continues to be open in all directions. It’s open down dip, it’s open along strike, and certain open at depth, and so there is still an opportunity there to add to the ounces identified to date. There is a lot of catalyst coming out this year in this quarter. We are going to complete a preliminary economic study on the high grade. The one we did in June last year was based off last year’s resource, not this year’s resource. We expect to have that this quarter. We are currently de-watering underground, and we’ve got a permit in place to actually drive a development expiration added from the Old West zone across into the Valley of the Kings. We’ll have an updated PEA also on a bulk tonnage opportunity, because this is what we think is an “Osisko.” Besides the very high-grade material, which sits within 1- to 2-gram material around it. We did a flow-through [financing] we announced the other day, so we’ve got the money to go back and we will be drilling aggressively, not only expanding on the resource but also doing in-field drilling, so we can move it on and complete a feasibility study by the end of this year. So throughout the year, there are going to be a lot of data points coming up, particularly starting in this quarter, and so I guess I would say, “I still own all my stock, and I’m not a seller.” L: Just one more question. This was discovered in Silver Standard. When you were there at Silver Standard, did you know it was going to get this big? Did you have a feeling like, “Yeah, this is it,” or how much luck is involved here? Bob: Largely luck. When I retired from Silver Standard in 2010, there was only a small resource at Bruce Jack, and there were a couple of drill holes that had hit some higher-grade material, and it was over the summer of 2010 that they drilled and then had a few more hits, and one of the drill samples had run a couple of kilos of gold, and I had only ever seen that type of mineralization either at the Royal Ontario Museum or when I worked at Red Lake, and felt if there is an opportunity like that here, then I’d like to have the opportunity to explore it – because like Ron, after doing Silver Standard for 25 years, it’s good to be back sitting on the drill rigs. I was up there in the camp this summer, continued to do sections in the office, and so, no, it’s – when Don McCloud at New Hawk did it, this was a blind deposit. They never saw it. No surface expression. It was just us methodically drilling every 50 and 100 meters. We lucked into the high-grade gold, and now we really know where to focus our drilling. L: Very good. Duane, we’ve had a lot of questions about Almaden, and Ixtaca zone started out so sexy and exciting, but then it seems you’re still hitting drill results but not quite the ones we had earlier on. Tell us a little bit about Almaden in general and about Ixtaca. What happens next and – Duane Poliquin: What we’ve been doing for a number of years is, let me start – if you take Nevada, in western Nevada is the Comstock lode, which was discovered early, and then the tectonic plate that’s shoving under North America, on the leading edge of that, you get copper-gold porphyries like Bingham Canyon, and you get all the Carlin-type stuff. And so we kind of applied that idea to Mexico, and over a period of years we took a helicopter – my son all the time and me with him as much as possible – and we sampled every intrusive center in eastern Mexico and every volcanic center from the American border clear down to Guatemala, and we have information the Mexican government doesn’t have. We age-dated all of those. We did whole-rock analysis, and we got a geological understanding of the eastern half of Mexico. We started staking claims, and part of it was there is no competition there. There’s not even any claims, so we acquired things like Caballo Blanco that had never had a claim on it before. It’s not on any government map, and we found a gold deposit, which we’ve sold to a gold group, and we found a nice copper/gold porphyry that we’re just doing a Titan-24 survey on right now, but it’s shaping up very nicely. Then inland from that a little ways, we found this Ixtaca zone, which also came out of that study, and again never had a claim on it before. It is a brand-new discovery. The only reason it’s still there is it’s covered with a thin veneer of volcanic ash from some volcanoes about 90 miles west of there, so there’s a little outcrop the size of this table in a creek with some little, tiny veins that have epithermal texture in them, so I’m quite proud of that discovery. We’re drilling it right now, and I wouldn’t agree with you that the results aren’t as good. We think they’re damn good results and they keep coming, and every hole we step out it’s there, and so we’re just going to keep – we’ve got four drills there working right now. L: I didn’t say they weren’t good, but we had some, let’s just say, more exciting results earlier on. Duane: Well, stay tuned. We’ve got four drills there right now, and it’s going to keep coming. And there are going to be more, because we’ve staked a whole bunch of things in this belt. We’ve got two other copper/gold porphyries staked that we haven’t had time to get to. We’ve got a bunch of other epithermal things with silver numbers, gold numbers on the surface. We just haven’t had time to get to it yet. We’ll drill this one off, and then we’ll go down the belt. L: Before you pass the mic on, let me ask about Gold Mountain, because some of our readers – because of the potential conflict of interest internally we haven’t recommended it, we haven’t said anything about Gold Mountain, though obviously we always love the Elk deposit. Both of you here – Duane: Well, we’re both here. Jim is – L: Who’s running the show? Who’s going to make Gold Mountain happen? He’s busy perfecting a mine… Duane: Jim has just hired somebody to run the show, I think. He’ll tell you. Do you want to tell him about that, Jim? Okay. Well, they did some drilling last summer, which I was quite delighted with, because we had never chased it into the volcanics, and they chased the zone into the volcanics and got some really nice numbers across underground mining widths and chased it about 400 meters into the volcanics. Everything else was in these vein swarms in the intrusive. So it’s developing nicely, and Jim’s the mining guy, which we’re very delighted to be in with. L: Jim’s going to build out, but you’re still going to have – you have an equity position? Duane: We have a large equity. L: Do you have a lot of input on the exploration? Duane: Yes, indeed. L: That’s what I want to hear because you guys are my favorites. Duane: We’re still there. Morgan is still there. Morgan is on the board of directors. L: Okay, Ron, so you already did a talk about Nevada. People probably don’t need you to do the whole story over again, but bring us up to date on what’s going on with Renaissance and what happens next. Ron Parratt: Sure. Well, as many of you probably know, we’re now about a year out on the spinout of Renaissance from AuEx. We had some good success there up in northeastern Nevada, a brand-new discovery, actually a new district of Carlin-type gold mineralization ended up in a 51-49 joint venture with Fronteer. They bought us, and three months later Newmont bought them for a couple billion dollars. It was quite a nice deal. Within three days of closing the deal with Fronteer, we did the spinout of Renaissance, the same team of people, almost all of the properties we had. Fronteer was only allowed to take the Pequop District properties, and we’ve been doing the same thing. We think the business model works very well. We are focused on continuing at that. We’re going to be very disciplined in our business approach, as we had been before – use other people’s money, leverage the risk out, minimize dilution, and get to discovery. We’ve got 30 projects we are working on now; 10 of those are in joint ventures. We drilled seven last year – Newmont, Sumitomo, Agnico, Eldorado, and some juniors, so a good program. You’ve got to be out drilling holes, taking swings with the bat to have success, so that’s a great focus for us, and we will do more this year, and hopefully we will get to meaningful discovery as soon as we can. L: How many projects are you going to drill this year? Ron: Well, as I said, we did seven this year. I know now that we’ll be drilling three in the first quarter of this year, two in Argentina, and we’ll be starting probably a six-month drilling program at our silver property in western Nevada with Liberty Silver. We know that the Wood Hills results are good enough. None of this is out yet, but they’re good enough that our partners are going to be back with a bigger program there. Sumitomo is already committed to a bigger program at Spruce Mountain. We’re running that program… Early yet in the year for everybody else, but I’m sure we’re going to do a fair bit more this year than we did last year. L: All right. This might be also a question for Ross, but Argentina – as you know we got pretty cold feet about mineral investing in that country. I noticed that the Rio Negro province just re-legalized gold mining – that was a good thing. Do you want to tell us a little bit about your sense of the political risk in Argentina? You’re quite welcome to disagree with the Casey consensus there, but tell us what you think. Ron: Well, we went to the Santa Cruz province first of all because of the endowment. We think it’s a great place to explore and that you can find gold there. It’s not a stretch. You look at the epithermal systems. That area is very early in its exploration history. We see a lot of upside. Obviously there is some political risk. The assessment of the recent change by Cristina looks as though it’s not going to be as great as everybody thought to begin with. Given that it’s Argentina, I think people are going to figure out how to make it even less as time goes on. We don’t see any diminishment of interest by potential partners for our properties down there. I attended an event in Toronto a couple of months ago on Santa Cruz proper through Macquarie. Great turnout, great interest. We’re still very bullish on the area, and we are going to continue working down there. L: All right. Well, Ross, we could probably do a panel just with you. We’ve got Magma, we’ve got Pan American, we’ve got all these different things going on, so I guess start out with your babies, your sweethearts. What are the sweet spots right now? If you’re speaking to an investor who wants to get in on a Ross Beaty play, what two or three things would you tell him to focus on right now? Ross Beaty: I would tell him to buy a portfolio of companies held by these guys, and they’re going to be rich beyond avarice. If you’d done that three years ago, you’d have made a better investment than any other investment portfolio in this entire building. L: That’s actually true. If you did the numbers… Ross: Yes. This is a very smart thing for you to do with a lot of these guys’ companies. Bob has had the best-performing gold stock in the world in 2011 – I had the best-performing copper stock in the world in 2011. These are exploration discoveries, and that’s what we do well. So, you know, it’s a nice – and of course Ron had a fantastic home run in Nevada just a couple of years ago, a mature exploration district, and what did those guys do? They found an entire new gold district in the most heavily explored region in the entire world, right under the nose of all the majors, and Newmont had to come along and pay $2.5 billion to buy it from him. That’s wealth creation by any measure, and it’s wealth creation because he’s a really, really good geologist, and Mark O’Dea is a really, really good geologist, and that’s what makes the discoveries. So, buy the geological talent and listen to guys like Casey who follow these companies and find these guys. The NexTen is another group of smart guys out there, finding the opportunities under the nose of the majors and making their shareholders a ton of money. So, that’s what I would do. L: Okay, well, give us a stock pick here. Lumina is up… Ross: So my little portfolio is a bit of a – it’s a mixed bag. On one hand, you have a large, mature company like Pan American Silver that is a play on silver and that’s going to go up or down depending on what happens to the metal commodity, really, because it is a big company – it trades $100 million of stock a day. This morning we just bought Minefinders for $1.5 billion, and I never thought in my remotest dream I’d ever be buying another company for $1.5 billion. It seems ridiculous, but you know what? It’s going to make a much better, stronger company. It’s a stable blue chip, second-largest silver producer in the world, primary producer in the world. It just doesn’t have the wild swings that you’re going to see with explorers. So that’s at one end. On the other end, I guess, the two companies that I have that are exploration companies – one is called Anfield Nickel, and it’s a nickel exploration stock in Guatemala, but even that is fairly mature because we’re trying to sell it now. I mean, right now, we’re trying to sell the company this year and the largest value added is behind us, so I wouldn’t really recommend that particularly as an exploration stock to follow. You could have asked me the same question that you asked Bob on Pretium with respect to Lumina Copper, which is a copper exploration project in Argentina which I thought had almost no value two years ago and now it’s – I think maybe we can sell it this year for more than $1 billion. It is currently capitalized at about $580 million, so is it too late to buy it? They had an incredible run last year. The stock chart looks like a hockey stick. It actually looks like the accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere over the last thousand years. Kind of… that’s what the stock looks like. So it’s done very well, but it’s trading at $13 and change today, and we think we’ll be able to get more than $20 a share this year and that means it’s pretty decent, relatively low-risk return for most shareholders. It’s got very little downside, and it could maybe not double but come close to doubling. That’s this year. So it’s a decent return there, and that’s a discovery story. That’s pure and simple where luck, I think, has played a huge, huge part. We had a property in Argentina that we didn’t think had much value. We called it the “ugly duckling” of a group of a whole bunch of copper deposits that we sold off over the last few years. Then we just all of a sudden started drilling holes in the right place, and we hit some fabulous copper results, high-grade, clean, huge. I mean everything that the major companies want to buy, and as the year went on, it just got bigger and better, and we’re still drilling fabulous holes. We got seven drills going on the property. It’s going to be – well, it was the biggest discovery of the year in the world last year for copper. There is lots of room for it to continue to grow, but ultimately the game plan is to sell it to a major, and we hope that will happen this year. And then, in the sort of middle, my main focus this year isn’t an exploration stock at all. It’s not even a mining or mineral commodities stock, it’s a clean-energy stock called Alterra Power, the merger between Magma Energy that I started a few years ago and Plutonic Power. Alterra Power for me is kind of like a legacy company. I’m really trying to build it into a huge clean-energy company because I think it’s good for the world, it’s good for my kids, and if I can do good things and make a buck at it and make a good investment case for a company that has appreciating value over time, I’m going to make my shareholders happy as well. So that’s my main focus today. We are over the hump. We are a sustainable business now. We’ve got about $55 million per year of cash generation forever. Forever. This is not a depleting business. Once you build these clean-energy plants from wind or hydro or geothermal power, they go forever, which is an absolutely beautiful thing in contrast to mining, which is a depleting industry. So that’s what I’m doing today. Louis: Sorry. You’re the broken slot machine. Where’s the early pick? Where’s the early-stage, you know, Anfield before it went up, Ventana before it went up, Lumina before it went up – is there one out there? Is there an early-stage Ross play? Ross: Well, yes, but it’s not really ready – it’s not there being packaged for public company or for third-party investors. L: We won’t tell, right, guys? We won’t tell. Ross: Yes. So just watch this space. There you go. L: Watch this space. Then duly program your Google News things to track the name “Ross Beaty.” Okay, Jimmy, you built Copper Mountain. What next? Jim: Well, I think a lot of you had an opportunity to go up there and see it on Saturday; and as you can see, we’re a fairly new company. We went public in 2007, and I think, as Ross says, there was a lot of value added through the exploration. Currently our market cap’s around $600 million, and we’re just getting started as a producer. The mine now is fully operational. Our intent is to optimize it in the next few months, maximize our production, and demonstrate performance. With regard to the exploration aspects, which we seem to be talking about – and I’m not an explorationist – but the property does have some excellent targets. We’ve got a very large property, about 18,000 acres, and we have about 5 billion pounds of resource right now and we believe as we drill some of our Titan-24 anomalies, this is going to increase. I guess lastly we see ourselves as having a very strong base for a growth company as a copper company and precious metals – about 20% of our value in sales right now is precious metals. So it’s our intent to continue to grow the company through exploration, through doing joint ventures with guys who really are successful in finding properties at an early stage, and then also looking at mergers and acquisitions that would help our shareholder value. L: What about the Voigt zone? I remember when we were up there before you built the plant and I was talking, all this copper is great, but I’m worried about copper… what about precious metals, and there were these drill holes in this area called the Voigt zone, just a couple, that suggested you might have a more gold-rich center there. Have we tested that? What’s up with that? Jim: I know, Louis has been pushing me in this direction forever, and this year we did put some drill holes in there. It was thought to be a fairly narrow zone, but there is a very large Titan-24 anomaly there, but they have drilled some of the areas and they did get good gold results. And as I’ve said, I’m not a geologist, so I can’t give you the details right now but we did publish them. L: Follow-up this year? Jim: Pardon? L: Will there be follow-up this year? Jim: Yes. It will be followed up. Definitely. L: Yes. It would be very nice to see a much brighter gold lining to the story there. I mean good insurance. Okay, I can think of lots of questions I can ask these guys all day. I know their projects pretty well, but it’s a rare chance when you get to pick the brains of the best in the business, and here they are, so while you’re here, do you have any questions? Does anybody want to – yes, sir? Ross: So the question was – Pan American Silver has a huge deposit in Argentina called Navidad. It’s the largest undeveloped silver deposit in the world, so it’s really, really big – and the question is what’s going on, and is it going to be developable because it’s in a province of Argentina that banned open-pit mining and the use of cyanide about eight years ago. They kind of swept the baby out with the bathwater because there was a gold deposit in the mountains in a really beautiful area. They didn’t want to mine that, so they said the whole province is off the territory for mining. So this deposit was then discovered. It’s in the middle of nowhere. It’s in a very nice, empty part of this Patagonian plain of Argentina, and it’s a huge deposit. There’s more than a billion ounces of silver, clean. It’s right on surface. It’s a beautiful, beautiful ore body, and it’ll double Pan American Silver’s production from 24 million ounces to 48 million ounces in, say, three years. The province, as Louis just said, the province just north of this particular province of Chubut is called Rio Negro. They also had a ban on the use of cyanide and mining, and they just overturned that in December – at the end of December – so what we expect will happen is in March this year, the government of Chubut has written a new law that’s going to zone the province into places that you can mine and places you can’t mine. The mountains will be no mining, right along the ocean will be no mining, and the center would be pro-mining. We’ve seen the law. The governor assures us it will be passed. There are some processes to go through, but we think it will happen in March, and that will open the way for development of Navidad. That will be a real game-changer for us. L: We’ve seen laws like this before. The Santa Cruz province where Ron’s operating, they also did something like this where they set out an area that was specifically “miners welcome here,” and it happens to be where Ron is operating on the Deseado Massif. So there is precedent there. Okay, more questions. The question was, we’ve heard about going south into Latin America and the idea of the lower-hanging fruit having been picked and having to go farther afield to look for big, world-class deposits; are you guys doing that? Are any of you looking to go into what might have previously been regarded as too risky or not worth the trouble? Where are the new frontiers, and is anybody taking them on? Ron? Ron Netolitzky: I think I’m coming to the conclusion that I’m liking working where the jurisdictions are as safe as I can get at my age. I mean you have enough exploration risk in this world to take on excessive political risk. Now, if there’s a wonderful deposit that’s already been identified, then you can look at it and say you play it from the political risk because you’ve got no exploration risks, but taking both on – not for me. Bob: Well, we’re in British Columbia and although some people think there’s risk around that, we think it’d be mitigated. Projects have been developed here, with what Jim’s just done, so projects get permitted in development here, and I’m a bit like Ron nowadays… keeping my focus a little closer to home. Duane: Well, as I described earlier, we went into Eastern Mexico where we had no competition. Many of the things we’ve staked never had a claim on it before, and we’re getting incredible assays, and two things are already obvious – one going to be a mine and one that we think will be a mine and we’re just getting started in that area, but the other frontier is depth. You look at the Hudson Bay Mining in Flin Flon, Manitoba. They were mining there for 80 years, and they just found as big a zone, not just found, but a few years ago, found as big a zone as they had mined for 80 years underneath, straight below. I mean they’re mining stuff that’s 4% copper and 7% zinc and a quarter-ounce gold, and it’s underneath, so there’s going to be a lot of exploration to depth. There are these new techniques where you can see deeper with geophysics, and in old areas where there are lots of mines, people are going to go down to depth. Look at Pebble, the discovery at depth, and look at Oyu Tolgoi. There’s going to be more exploration to depth in old, established areas. Ron Parratt: Our company – in addition to Argentina and of course Nevada, we’re working in Spain. So far, we’ve found the political environment to be reasonable. Things don’t happen quite as quickly as we want, but we do have worries about obviously the Spanish economy, problems in Portugal, all over Europe right now. And it seems to me that people are just afraid to make decisions because all the government employees don’t want to lose their jobs, and if they make a decision and approve a project or grant a license, they worry that the next group coming in will hold them at fault for that, and they’ll lose their jobs and they don’t want to lose their government jobs. You have to be pretty careful. If it’s in Argentina, some provinces, as you’ve just heard, are good to be in; some are not so good to be in. I work a lot in the US; I would not work in California. There are other states I’m not going to go to. You have to pick your battles pretty carefully. I agree with Ron. Exploration is really risky, and if you risk losing the asset you might find on top of the discovery risk, you really need to ask yourself if that’s the right thing to do, so we’re going to stick with the countries we are in now. We’ll stay in the Americas. I think Mexico would be okay, but as a small junior company we can’t be working in too many countries. I think we’ll lose focus, and I think that’ll be a bad thing. Ross: I look at this question really from the standpoint of standing in your shoes as an investor, and I guess my bottom line to this is, don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Diversify your risks. Don’t buy one company, buy a handful of companies. Don’t invest in exploration in one country, invest in a pile of countries, because you just never know. There are so many risks in this game – not just geologic risk or mining risk but political risk, social risk, environmental risk, stupid risk that just makes no sense to anybody – but it happens and it just happens all the time. Australia – once thought to be the safest, best, lowest-tax jurisdiction – a few years ago brought in an absolutely idiotic, insane super province tax that destroyed Australia as a good place to do business. Luckily, the industry had such a big lobby power that they were able to stop the government from doing that, but BC, just a short eight or nine years ago, we had a bunch of socialists running this place, and they made a mess of it. They made an absolute mess of it. It was a horrible place to explore because they didn’t give you any value. So things can change really quickly, and you just – you can be awfully clever about assessing a risk regime in terms of political and social environmental risk, but crazy things happen. And so for me, I’m invested in 18 countries right now; and I happen to know every single year there’s going to be one that is just absolutely wonderful beyond my expectations, and there’s going to be one that’s just a nightmare – again, beyond my expectations. The other principle I have, though, is “Life is too short.” And that means don’t go to places that are just pathologically criminal like Russia and most of the CIS. Both Bob Quartermain and I have joint experience in that. There are some parts of the world that are just super-tough that are, you know, no matter what the opportunity, it’s just not worth the effort, and I put sort of Venezuela today in that category, quite frankly Bolivia, maybe Ecuador, places like that, certain countries in Africa, anywhere in the CIS. Life’s too short. It doesn’t matter what the reward. If you have to deal with criminals and people are trying to steal from you every single second, it’s just not worth it. Jim: Well, I think I have to agree with Ron and Ross in that, number one, of course, you’ve got a lot of risk, and I guess you have to weigh the political risk. If you had a fantastic deposit, you’d probably take a little more political risk, but I think as Ross said, I’m of an age too where I’m not going to venture out too far, and I don’t have a bulletproof jacket, so I’m not going to take a lot of risk in terms of going to places where you don’t know whether you really own anything or whether you can hold it or if somebody is going to take it, so I’m along that line too. L: This is very, very interesting. Jimmy, I put you a little bit on the spot there because of where you’re focused, but I wanted to see if I could get unanimity, and basically we got unanimity. These are the most successful, best brains in the business and this conventional – it’s become almost conventional wisdom that the low-hanging fruit has been picked. We’ve got to go farther afield, and we have unanimity here saying, “You know what? Life’s too short. Go where you know you can work,” so that’s something – it would be interesting to ask the same question at the NexTen panel and see if slightly darker average color of hair would give the same unanimous response. But no, that’s very interesting. Words from the wise. Okay, I think we have time for maybe one more question. Copper. Maybe a real quick two sentences, thumbs up/thumbs down on copper. You know, we have the bearish argument near-term about economic trouble. Doug Casey is talking about the Greater Depression and all these things, obviously bearish for industrial metals. We’ve got two copper producers sitting here. Obviously you want to be optimistic about copper – the world needs it. Chindia, all these things. Ron Netolitzky, just a quick take. Are you – long-term we’re all bulls on copper because we know the world needs it, but near-term, this year – are you buying copper plays and would you? Ron Netolitzky: I would look at any mineral. I think they all have their opportunities, and in this business I’m not short-term cycled. I mean, when everything comes out of favor, it’s actually a great time to start playing in it, and you’ve got to be really contra-cyclic. We all pretend to be, but it’s a hard decision to make because when everybody hates it is when you should love it. Bob: Right, and I go to a comment that Ross made earlier about buying people around the table. I’m a Lumina shareholder, and I’m a very happy Lumina shareholder and I’m adding it to my position because of the exploration upside that’s there. Same as my own company. I’ve owned Ron’s companies, I’ve owned Duane’s companies as well as Ross’s, and so long-term I continue to be very bullish on copper and continue to own it in my portfolio, both major companies as well as members sitting around this table. Same with uranium. I’m with Ron on this. I think now is the time to be out there buying and I don’t think you need to be concerned about what happens this year. If you’re doing that, then you really have to look at exploration as a very long-term gain. With Ross I started investing in silver back in 1993-94. That has served me very well, and I’ll continue to invest in the people around this table and the commodities that they’re looking for, and I think that’s a strategy that I’d follow. Duane: In the short term, you know, everybody – just open the paper or watch the television. Every government in the world is in debt, and they can’t pay them, and there’s all this mess, but you know what – the world isn’t going to end. I mean even the ’30s, which was so terrible, it came to an end and life went on, and a lot of good life went on, so in the short term, I think precious metals are a good place to be because they’ve got to settle their debts, and they’ve got to do something, and they’ve got to make people believe in money again, and so on. So I think precious metals in the short term are a very good place to be, but there used to be an old expression, “Copper is king,” and copper is the main metal of civilization, and it will go on and on and on, and as all these things get sorted out and human ingenuity and despite governments, things will be good, so long term I think copper is a great thing. Ron Parratt: I certainly agree with Duane. I think a lot of the exploration plays we’re looking at now are of course copper for the future. These aren’t going to come out of the ground this year. We’re looking at two, three, four years away, depending on the municipality that they’re located in, so I think, really, you need to be thinking about the longer-term price environment and of course it’s very deposit-specific. Each commodity has a range of production costs by commodity. You always want to try to look at those in the lower-cost curve position that are going to be sustainable long-term. They’re the ones that are going to do well, and especially if prices go down and you’re a lower-quartile producer, you’re going to have a good company. L: Ross, I’m a little bit nervous about giving you a chance. Ross: Okay, so here’s my pitch. So how many of you were at the Casey conference – where was it? – it was in Phoenix last November, October? L: Yes, October. Ross: So there’s a Casey conference in October. Were any of you there? A handful. So here was a room – now October, I admit, was kind of a bleak time. There were a lot of European governments looking pretty iffy, and there was a lot of doom and gloom in the US still, of course there always is when you get a group of Casey investors together. I mean the whole bloody conference is all about, “What are we going to buy when everything melts down? We’re going to buy guns and drugs so we can sell them.” It was like one of these, you know – I mean, take a happy pill. That’s kind of what I felt, and I was the only voice of optimism. L: This is true; true story. Ross: The only voice, and here we are in January, things are looking better. Copper price is up, gold price is up, silver price is up – you know what, Europe is going to live, it’s not going to die, and we are not going into a vortex of hell, financial hell – we just aren’t – and I think Duane’s comment is valid. Every day there are more people who are born, we all want junk, there are more people getting into a monetary system coming from farms into cities, more people with more money means more people want junk, junk means commodities, commodities are what we produce and discover. So there are two sides to this copper coin. There is the demand side. Demand is strong for copper. It is being driven by all these new people in the world, the new monetary or the new people who have money in the world in India, in Indonesia, in China and Brazil and Russia and all kinds of huge population areas – forget about Europe. Who cares about Europe? In copper on the demand side, Europe is a non-event. It doesn’t matter – even the US. The US today, nothing in the US drives copper demand. Copper demand is driven by what’s happening in the emerging countries, and it’s going crazy there. Copper demand in China went up 8% last year. The world built more automobiles last year than they’ve even built in history – I forget the number, but it was a record number of cars, and cars today use more copper than they have ever used before because there is more want, more need for, motors in the cars, there are more hybrid cars. They just use more copper, so the demand side of copper is fantastic. It’s not going to melt down, it’s good, it’s strong. But what a lot of these pundits who even know the demand side don’t understand is, on the copper supply side, it’s equally bullish. We aren’t finding as much copper as we’re mining. We aren’t finding it because the big deposits have been discovered. The new deposits are harder to find. They’re not as big. They’re not as rich. You can’t see it from a satellite by and large like you used to. These are big, big deposits, and we are just not replacing consumption as much, and long term that’s just as bullish for higher copper prices as increased demand. Now, of course it’s not going to go up forever. At some point, there’s going to be a price that people are going to stop consuming it or finding replacements, and they are going to start mining some of these really, really low-grade deposits of which there are a number in the world. But just to mine those takes five to ten years of permitting and financing and construction. Construction costs have gone off the chart, so mines are harder to build today, they’re harder to permit, they’re much harder to discover. If you look at a chart – there’s a very cool chart that a group called the Mineral Economics Group has put out, which charts exploration expenditures for copper against discovery rates. It’s an inverse curve. The more we’re spending on copper exploration in the last 10 years, the less we’re actually finding. The existing mines are becoming lower grade. They are becoming deeper. They’re becoming more high-cost. The only way that supply equation can be matched with the increased demand is with higher prices, so I am bullish on copper for both of those reasons. Jim: I don’t think I can add anything to that, but I do agree, I mean, long-term we have the demand. We have a shortage of supply. It’s going to be difficult to meet the difference, but also the cost of production. I mean, as the costs of production go up, the price has to be there, or else we’re not going to have copper, so I have to be bullish on copper, and I feel very fortunate that we’re in production at this time to enjoy the future. L: Okay, with that, I think we better take a break. In 10 minutes, Jeff Clark will be back here to tell us about buying and owning gold and silver. Thank you very much. Gentleman, thank you very much – a great panel.last_img read more

first_imgFebruary’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which left 17 dead and 17 more wounded, horrified people across the country, spurring student walkouts and marches in support of stricter gun control laws, including universal, comprehensive background checks and a ban on assault weapons. But gun debates in the United States have proven to be contentious and intractable. Even as thousands rally for new legislation, opponents contend that such measures won’t prevent determined criminals from obtaining a firearm and that responsible gun ownership makes communities safer.In charting a course forward, it is necessary to move beyond “people’s anecdotal opinions,” says David Hemenway, director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. He and other researchers are analyzing data and conducting studies with the ultimate goal of informing public policy. It’s a tough task, in part because of a by now well-known piece of legislation called the Dickey Amendment, passed by Congress in 1996 with the support of the National Rifle Association. This amendment prevented the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using funds “to advocate or promote gun control.” It didn’t ban federally-funded gun research, but the legislation had a chilling effect: from 1996 to 2013, CDC funding in this area dropped by 96 percent.Against this backdrop, it can be easy to overlook an important fact: Research into gun violence has actually increased in recent years, rising from fewer than 90 annual publications in 2010 to 150 in 2014. Universities, think tanks, private philanthropy –even the state of California — have offered support. And in late April, governors from six northeastern states and Puerto Rico announced plans to launch a research consortium to study the issue. A December 2017 policy article published in the journal Science describes a “surge” of recent scientific publications.”The scope and quality of gun-related research is growing, with clear implications for the policy debate,” write the authors, a pair of researchers from Duke and Stanford. This research has generated significant findings about suicide, intimate partner violence, community health, and the effect of various state-level gun laws.A leading cause of deathMore than 36,000 people are killed by gunshot in the U.S. every year, making it a leading cause of death in the country, comparable to motor vehicle incidents. Among those deaths, nearly two-thirds are suicides. “A gun in the home increases the risk of someone in that home dying from suicide maybe threefold, and the evidence is overwhelming,” Hemenway says.A conventional view holds that if people really want to kill themselves, they will find a way to do it — with or without a gun. Yet the data suggest that households with guns do not differ from those without guns when it comes to mental health risk for suicide. Instead, the difference seems to stem from the fact that suicide attempts with a gun are usually fatal, unlike attempts with pills, for example. Putting time and distance between a suicidal person and a gun can save that person’s life.This line of thinking is supported by a study published in the Journal of Surgical Research, which found that states with weaker gun laws have more gun-related suicide attempts, which tend to be associated with higher mortality. Dr. Rodrigo Alban, a surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and his colleagues analyzed data on nearly 35,000 subjects spanning 14 years. Almost two-thirds of the firearm suicide attempts occurred in states with the lowest scores for policies regulating guns from the nonprofit Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence — mostly states in the South and West. These states had little to no gun legislation, such as background checks, concealed weapons laws, and safe storage laws.Of course, correlation doesn’t imply causation, and Alban and his co-authors identify a need for research that pinpoints which particular laws have the greatest effect on reducing suicide attempts. But in the meantime, in light of these findings, they conclude that, “Efforts aimed at nationwide standardization of firearm state laws are warranted.”The riskiest gun ownersAnother route to reducing gun violence, academics suggest, is to identify risk factors that increase a person’s chances of harming themselves or others. Such individuals could then be considered for gun violence restraining orders. This was the logic behind the 1968 Gun Control Act, which specified narrow categories of people disqualified from buying or owning guns, including convicted felons and people committed to mental institutions. The 1994 Violence Against Women Act and the subsequent Lautenberg Amendment were written to bolster protections for victims of domestic violence.But these laws only apply to people who are currently or formerly married, live or have lived together, or have shared children. Susan Sorenson, a professor of social policy and public health at the University of Pennsylvania, finds in recent research that they fail to protect a growing portion of the population who are in dating relationships, who can be just as violent.A separate study led by Carolina Díez of Boston University assessed state laws and confirms Sorenson’s conclusions. Domestic violence homicide rates drop by 10 percent in states prohibiting intimate partners with restraining orders from owning guns and requiring them to relinquish them.Some states have gone a step further and passed so-called “risk-warrant” laws. In 1999, Connecticut became the first to pass such legislation allowing police to obtain a warrant to temporarily remove guns from someone who poses an imminent hazard to themselves or others. Dr. Garen Wintemute, an emergency room physician at the University of California, Davis Medical Center and director of the Violence Prevention Research Program, advocates for gun violence restraining orders based, in part, on a 2016 evaluation of Connecticut’s law.Wintemute points to individual cases where such laws would have made a difference: “The Parkland shooter was making all kinds of public pronouncements,” he says. “A gun violence restraining order would’ve allowed his family or law enforcement to go to a judge and get an order that would’ve gotten that gun taken away from him and prevented the shooting.”The remaining research gapFollowing the barrage of nearly daily shootings, some researchers have begun to call for a community-wide approach, rather than only focusing on high-risk individuals. Charles Branas, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, says that poverty can contribute to gun violence within communities.In their latest research, Branas and his colleagues examined hundreds of vacant land plots and abandoned buildings in U.S. cities, with a focus on Philadelphia. These abandoned spaces, like old parking lots and homes, often become places to store illegal firearms. Millions of people live near and walk by these spaces, which can cause community members to feel unsafe or stressed. Using a randomized control design, Branas found that interventions such as planting trees and plants and boarding up windows and doors can make a difference.”Gun violence can be sustainably reduced in poor neighborhoods of those cities by as much as 29 percent,” he says. “These cost peanuts. The return on investment is very high, because shootings are very expensive events.”For all the progress made in gun violence research, gaps still remain. In March, the RAND Corporation released a meta-analysis of thousands of studies published since 2003. The report states that, “Federal funding for research on gun-related mortality is far below levels for other sources of mortality in the United States.” As a result, more research is warranted in virtually all aspects of gun control policy, including on officer-involved shootings, defensive gun use, gun-free zones, the gun industry, and lost or stolen firearms, to name a few.The latest federal budget, passed by Congress and signed by President Trump in March, may offer some assistance, as it technically allows the CDC to fund research on gun violence. It doesn’t reverse the Dickey Amendment, however, and CDC officials may still face resistance when trying to support such research. In any case, it’s ultimately up to lawmakers — and the public they answer to — to determine how to balance Second Amendment rights with scientific data.”Hopefully these policy debates have some science behind them,” Hemenway says. “Everything we learn should matter and should have an effect.”Ramin Skibba is an astrophysicist turned science writer based in San Diego. He has written for Newsweek, Slate, Scientific American, Nature, Science, among other publications. He can be reached on Twitter at @raminskibba.This article was originally published on Undark. Copyright 2018 Undark Magazine. To see more, visit Undark Magazine.last_img read more

first_imgThe long-running breast milk vs. formula debate made headlines earlier this week.The New York Times reported that the Trump administration had tried to remove language from a WHO resolution that would, according to reporter Andrew Jacobs, “promote and protect breastfeeding around the world, especially in developing countries” and limit the promotion of infant formula.President Donald Trump tweeted his rationale for the U.S. position: “The failing NY Times Fake News story today about breast feeding must be called out. The U.S. strongly supports breast feeding but we don’t believe women should be denied access to formula. Many women need this option because of malnutrition and poverty.”Public health professionals have a different perspective: In poor countries, a mother’s decision about breastfeeding can be critical for her baby’s survival. That’s because formula carries special risks for low-income families.The first problem arises because powdered formula requires a dependable source of clean water, which is not available to some 780 million people, according to the World Health Organization. “In countries where women live in poor households with poor sanitation, it becomes a matter of life and death,” says Rafael Perez-Escamilla, director of Global Health Concentration at the Yale School of Public Health. “If the water is not clean, formula becomes a death sentence for the infant.”Even in the best of circumstances, formula feeding has disadvantages. According to decades of research analyzed and summarized in a 2016 Lancet series on breastfeeding, the harm caused by formula feeding includes increased risk of diarrhea and respiratory infections. In addition, according to the Lancet series, more than 800,000 formula-fed infants who die each year could be saved by breastfeeding mostly by reducing diarrhea, respiratory infections and malnutrition from diluted formula. Breast milk has been proven, over decades of research, to be unarguably the best nutrition for babies with its nearly perfect mix of easily digested vitamins, protein and fat. In addition, new research in the July 2017 JAMA Pediatrics has shown that beneficial bacteria from the mother colonize in the baby’s gut, helping the infant establish a healthy microbiome — bacteria in the intestine that help fight disease throughout life. Because the bacteria are unique to mother and baby, the establishment of the microbiome has been called nature’s first personalized medicine and cannot be replicated in formula.Harms from formula-feeding fall disproportionately on poor women in poor countries, says Perez-Escamilla, not only because of unsanitary drinking water but also because of poverty. Purchasing formula can use 30 percent or more of an impoverished family’s income, he says. “Then, women start diluting the formula to make it last longer,” he says. Drinking watered down formula leads to malnourishment, illness and even death. “And then, too, the money spent on formula is not available for other things the baby might need, like health care,” he says.No additional research is needed to prove that breast milk is the gold standard of nutrition for infants, says Dr. Adriano Cattaneo, an epidemiologist retired from the Unit for Health Services Research and International Health, Institute for Child Health “Burio Garofolo,” in Trieste, Italy.He has grown tired of pointing out and defending the proven benefits of breast milk for mothers and babies. “From a scientific point of view, carrying out research on the benefits of breastfeeding doesn’t make sense. Would anybody carry out research on the benefits of breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool?” says Cattaneo.”The burden of proof should fall on those who propose alternatives to breastfeeding,” Cattaneo says in an email interview with NPR. “Formula feeding lags far behind … breastfeeding in terms of safety and benefits. So we should never talk of the benefits of breastfeeding. We should talk about the harms of formula feeding.”Cattaneo argued in 2007 in an editorial in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health that research should center on effective methods to encourage and support women in breastfeeding. That was the goal of the resolution at the meeting of the World Health Assembly in Geneva in May.As for the belief that poor women who are themselves malnourished cannot adequately provide breast milk for their babies — that’s not true, says Cattaneo.”I’m very aware of the arguments from Trump,” says Perez-Escamilla of the president’s assertion that many poor women “need access to formula.””Many poor women are undernourished, and that spreads the notion that their milk is low quality and low quantity,” he says. “But their milk is still better than formula.”Cattaneo agrees. “When the formula industry says that mothers in low-income countries are too sick and malnourished to breastfeed, that is false. Breast milk is of excellent quality even if a mother is sick or malnourished. Quantity is also adequate, except in rare cases of terminal disease or very severe malnutrition.”There are few medical conditions and treatments that rule out breastfeeding, says Perez-Escamilla. Today, even women who are infected with HIV can follow the same recommendations for breastfeeding as uninfected women, provided they are on anti-retroviral therapy. “Women receiving some types of chemotherapy, or on some types of antidepressants or who are substance abusers should not breastfeed,” he says. “But overall, there are very, very few situations where she cannot breastfeed.”Nestle, along with Danone, Mead Johnson Nutrition and Abbott Laboratories, is one of the four leading corporations selling infant formula around the world.In 1977, Nestle’s formula practices made headlines when a boycott was announced in the U.S. in response to what breastfeeding advocates termed “aggressive marketing” of formula, especially in poor countries.Then and now, Nestle has defended its practices.In a statement emailed to NPR this week, Nestle said: “Nestlé strongly supports breastfeeding and has not wavered on this position. We have not, nor would we ever, lobby any governments — including the US government — to oppose breastfeeding policies anywhere in the world.”A study on industry practices by Save the Children finds that the top six formula manufacturers sometimes use marketing practices at odds with the code of marketing practices for infant formula drawn up by the World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of WHO. The International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes includes a call for no promotion of breast milk substitutes to the public, no gifts to mothers or health workers, no free samples to pregnant women or mothers and no sponsorship of meetings of health professionals. The report found cases of companies paying doctors to recommend their milk formulas and offering coupons, contests, gifts and other incentives to mothers to buy formula. The results are in line with earlier findings of ARCH, Assessment and Research on Child Health, an organization that investigates how foods for children are promoted. ARCH’s 2016 study of Tanzania, Cambodia, Nepal and Senegal found similar promotional activities by formula companies.”At the end of the day, it is the woman’s decision to decide how she wants to feed her baby,” says Perez-Escamilla. “It should be a truly informed choice on a level playing field. But that is impossible in low-income countries in an environment that is pushing them to formula feed.”Susan Brink is a freelance writer who covers health and medicine. She is the author of The Fourth Trimester, and co-author of A Change of Heart. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

first_imgA disabled campaigner has sent an 80-page dossier of evidence to the new first minister of Wales in a last-ditch bid to persuade him to abandon plans to close the Welsh government’s independent living grant scheme.Nathan Lee Davies has written to Mark Drakeford with just two months left until the planned closure of the Welsh Independent Living Grant (WILG), which was itself set up as an interim scheme following the UK government’s decision to close the Independent Living Fund in June 2015.Davies, who has led the Save WILG Campaign, told Drakeford in an open letter this week that closing WILG would leave disabled people with high support needs “at the mercy of cash-strapped Local Authorities who seem intent on cutting vital support packages across the board with no guarantee that further cuts will not follow”.He said that local authorities “seem to be treating disabled people as a burden”.Davies points out in the letter that Drakeford had promised – during his successful campaign to lead the Welsh Labour party last year – that if an independent evaluation of the WILG closure showed the new system “not working as well as the old one” then he would be “prepared to reverse it”.WILG was set up by the Welsh government – with UK government funding – as a short-term measure to support former ILF recipients when the fund was closed in June 2015.But the Welsh government is now closing WILG and transferring the funding to local councils, and by April the 22 local authorities will be solely responsible for meeting the support needs of all former ILF-recipients in Wales.Davies said the “deep dive review” of cases in which WILG recipients were having their support cut was “full of errors” and had failed to consult the disabled people who will be affected.He pointed to his own experience at the hands of his local authority, Wrexham council, which he said had treated him “abysmally”.Davies, who has a life-limiting condition, said that the process to reassess his support needs, due to end in September 2018, had still not been completed and was having “a negative impact” on both his physical and mental health.He described how his social worker had laughed when he suggested he needed 24-hour support and told him that no-one in the borough received that level of support.He said that the lack of overnight support in his current social care package meant he had to stop drinking at 8pm at night and get ready for bed at 10pm, and often had to call his 68-year-old father to assist him in the night, even though he lives a 10-minute drive away and has arthritis in both hands.The dossier, which has already been shared with the deputy health and social services minister Julie Morgan, includes a description of a day in his life, from last January, showing the poor level of support he already receives – even before the closure of WILG – and the pain and indignity this exposes him to, as well as the lack of choice and control in his life.Davies says: “It is 2018 and I am still being treated like a second class citizen. “I have a progressive condition of the nervous system which is accelerating at quite a rate, yet I still have the same amount of inadequate care and support hours that I did in 2010 when I first began independent living.”He updated this by posting a new blog yesterday, showing that little had changed in the last year.In the dossier, he warns the Welsh Labour party: “I do not want to spend the last days of my life completely unnecessarily fighting against the party I have defended and campaigned for across many years.“But I will if I have to. Please don’t make me.”The dossier also includes a letter from a director of Disability Wales, Trevor Palmer, in which he says the planned WILG closure has “created serious disruptions” to his life, with local authority “incompetence and lack of understanding” that has led to his support package being “substantially” reduced. A Welsh government spokesperson said: “We believe that disabled people’s ability to live independently should not be compromised by any changes to the way in which support is arranged for those people who previously received payments from the WILG.“The first minister has just received Mr Davies’ open letter regarding the WILG and will carefully consider the detailed points it makes.“He has asked the deputy minister for health and social services to consider what further action may be necessary to ensure disabled people in receipt of the WILG are not adversely affected by this change.  “The deputy minister has provided Mr Davies and the National Assembly’s petitions committee with details of the deep dive review.“She also met Mr Davies at his home to hear his concerns and discuss the issues raised in his dossier.”He said the deep dive review had seen the 22 Welsh local authorities audit all cases where they intended to cut the WILG element of people’s support.This found planned reductions in about 157 cases, and increases in support in a similar number, out of 1,174 people.He claimed that the cuts had taken place because “some people had developed a need for healthcare rather than social care while some, due to their support being provided in a different way or being of a different type, had a reduced need for care overall”.He accepted that two questionnaires, commissioned from the All Wales Forum of Parents and Carers of People with Learning Disabilities, had had a low response rate, but he said that responses to it “have been positive about the way assessments have been undertaken and the outcomes people have received”.Charlotte Walton, Wrexham council’s head of adult social care, said: “We cannot comment on any individual’s care and support needs. “However we do not accept the allegations being made. “We have carried out all of the WILG reviews in a person centred and inclusive manner and working with the individual recipients of the fund [has] enabled them to achieve positive outcomes from the reviews.”Davies said he would now push for a meeting with the first minister.He said: “I am not going anywhere and will continue to fight this until justice is served.”Picture: Nathan Lee Davies with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

first_imgShareRice UniversityOffice of Public Affairs / News & Media RelationsAmy Hodges713-348-6777amy.hodges@rice.eduInga Kiderra858-822-0661ikiderra@ucsd.eduAcademic workplace bias against parents hurts nonparents too, researchers findHOUSTON – (March 31, 2014) –Parents have reported before that trying to balance work and family obligations comes with career costs. But a new study from Rice University and the University of California, San Diego, shows that university workplace bias against scientists and engineers who use flexible work arrangements may increase employee dissatisfaction and turnover even for people who don’t have children.“As researchers, we’re interested in understanding the gap between the traditional 9-to-5 work setting and what workers actually need,” said Erin Cech, an assistant professor of sociology at Rice and the study’s lead author. “The majority of parents are in the workforce today, yet the expectations and arrangements of work have stayed more or less the same as they were post-World War II. We’re trying to understand this mismatch and its consequences.”The study, “Consequences of Flexibility Stigma Among Academic Scientists and Engineers,” examined “flexibility stigma” — employers’ and co-workers’ negative attitudes toward employees who seek or are presumed to need flexible work arrangements to deal with child care responsibilities — at one university. The study found that people who reported an awareness of the flexibility stigma in their departments — regardless of whether they are parents themselves — were less interested in staying at their jobs, more likely to want to leave academia for industry and less satisfied with their jobs than those who did not report a flexibility stigma in their department. They also felt as though they had worse work-life balance.“Flexibility stigma is not just a workers’ problem,” said study co-author Mary Blair-Loy, an associate professor of sociology at UC San Diego and founding director of the Center for Research on Gender in the Professions. “Workplaces where this bias exists are more likely to have a toxic culture that hurts the entire department, not only in terms of work-life balance but also retention and job satisfaction, which may affect department productivity.”The researchers suggest that the study sheds light on workplace issues across a wide spectrum of professional fields.“Because this is an academic setting, faculty tend to have a great deal of freedom to re-arrange their busy schedules to accommodate family responsibilities,” Cech said. “We imagine that the effects of flexibility stigma on job satisfaction and employee turnover might be even more counterproductive in professional workplaces that have less schedule control. Dealing with work-life balance issues is not just about instituting the right polices, but it is also about undermining the stigma that comes along with using those policies.”Cech also noted that one consequence of flexibility stigma – employee turnover – can be expensive.“It can be extremely costly — on average, between $90,000 and $400,000 when accounting for lab space and student assistants — for startup packages for new science and engineering faculty,” she said. “This suggests that reducing flexibility stigma would not only be good for workers, but good for the bottom line as well.”Blair-Loy said that the work-devotion schema – the idea that one’s career requires intense time commitments and strong loyalty – is a mandate that is unconsciously part of most professional workplaces and underlies the flexibility stigma.“Work devotion is useful for employers because it helps motivate senior management, but is destructive to people trying to care for family members,” Blair-Loy said. “It underlies this stigma that is damaging to all members of the department, not just the ones that are parents.”Blair-Loy noted that the silver lining of their research suggests that many faculty who are not currently parents are aware of the flexibility stigma.“These individuals can be real allies in making a more inclusive, welcoming environment for everyone,” Blair-Loy said. “It provides the opportunity to broaden awareness of problematic work environments and educate others about this bias.”The study included 266 science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) faculty members at a top-ranked university with pre-eminent science and engineering programs. The respondents answered online survey questions about whether mothers and fathers with young or school-aged children are perceived as less committed to their careers than women or men who are not parents, and whether individuals choosing to use formal or informal arrangements for work-life balance experience negative career consequences.The research is part of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project “Divergent Trajectories: A Longitudinal Study of Organizational and Departmental Factors Leading to Gender and Race Differences in STEM Faculty Advancement, Pay and Persistence.” Blair-Loy is the principal investigator and Cech is the co-principal investigator for the project. The study appeared in a recent issue of Work and Occupations and was funded by the NSF.-30-For more information, contact Amy Hodges, senior media relations specialist at Rice, at 713-348-6777 or amy.hodges@rice.edu.This news release can be found online at http://news.rice.edu/.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related Materials:Erin Cech bio: http://sociology.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=570Cech is an assistant professor of sociology in Rice’s School of Social Sciences.Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,920 undergraduates and 2,567 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6.3-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go here.If you do not wish to receive news releases from Rice University, reply to this email and write “unsubscribe” in the subject line. Office of News and Media Relations – MS 300, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 AddThislast_img read more

first_img Source:https://ku.edu/ Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 17 2019Brain-computer interfaces promise to restore communication for individuals with severe speech and physical impairments. Current brain computer interfaces share many features of high-tech, conventional augmentative and alternative communication systems, but via direct brain link. Choosing the “right” brain-computer interface that maximizes reliability of the neural control signal and minimizes fatigue and frustration is critical.Jonathan Brumberg, assistant professor of speech-language-hearing at the University of Kansas, will present on this subject and demonstrate a variety of brain-computer interfaces in his talk, “Evolution in Technology to Aid and Restore Communication,” at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.Related StoriesResearchers measure EEG-based brain responses for non-speech and speech sounds in childrenNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskWhat: “Talking without Speaking: Overcoming Communication Challenges with Technology,” a scientific sessions panel at AAAS.Who: Jonathan Brumberg, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS; brumberg@ku.eduWhen: 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM Sunday, February 17, 2019Where: Marriott Wardman Park – Thurgood Marshall Ballroom East, 2660 Woodley Rd NW, Washington, D.C., 20008Background (panel description): Millions live with developmental or acquired communication disorders that significantly limit their ability to communicate with those around them. People can be left at a loss for words because of disorders such as autism, cerebral palsy, or intellectual disability, as well as acquired disorders such as stroke and brain injury. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) helps people overcome communication barriers via a range of high- and low-tech options. No longer simply science fiction, brain-computer interfaces can now be a plausible solution for acquired disorders. Evolving mobile technology has helped to normalize AAC use by making tablet and smartphones central to everyday interaction. However, the attitude that there’s an app for everything creates its own problems. First, basic language challenges, such as aphasia and autism, require well-organized interface designs and partner support for successful AAC use. For people with relatively intact cognitive-linguistic skills, barriers include physical access to devices. The recipe for successful communication for people needing AAC requires the right technology as well as an understanding of user abilities and limitations. While possibilities are endless, considerations about the application of technology must always be at the forefront of AAC implementation practice. The session explores these scientific opportunities and pragmatic challenges.last_img read more

first_imgThis means that doctors who help these patients should be aware that they have a high risk of bleeding and should therefore not prescribe too much anticoagulant medicine.”Kasper Adelborg, Aarhus University Blood clot in the heart: Forty per cent higher. Blood clot in the brain: Twenty per cent higher. Blood clot in the legs and lungs: over three hundred per cent higher. Bleeding: Two hundred per cent higher. Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerHe adds that with each individual patient there is still a need to weigh up the overall risk of a blood prop and bleeding, which includes taking into account the patient’s age, medical history, other diseases, lifestyle etc. before choosing a treatment.Major preventative potential:The new study, which has been published in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, corroborates previous studies, though researchers have not previously looked at the entire group of hematological cancer patients together – and neither were there any studies covering so many years. Additionally, previous studies have either focused solely on blood clots or bleeding.Kasper Adelborg emphasizes that there are major differences in the prognoses for the different patient groups. For example. only a few children develop a blood prop of suffer bleeding in the years after suffering from leukemia, while far more patients with e.g. bone marrow cancer develop blood props and/or bleeding.”The potential for prevention is particularly large in the latter group,” he says.In relation to the population as a whole, the study shows the heightened risk for hematological cancer patients: Source:Aarhus UniversityJournal reference:Adelborg, K. et al. (2019) Risk of thromboembolic and bleeding outcomes following hematological cancers: A Danish population‐based cohort study. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. doi.org/10.1111/jth.14475. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 27 2019New Danish research may help direct focus towards the serious complications that on average every fifth hematological cancer patient suffers. This is according to medical doctor and PhD Kasper Adelborg from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, who has studied the cases of 32,000 hematological cancer patients between the years 2000-2013. Hematological cancer includes leukemia, bone marrow cancer and cancers of the lymph nodes.”This is a broad group of patients with very different disease experiences depending on the type of hematological cancer. Some patients have a particular risk of suffering blood clots, while others have instead a higher risk of bleeding such as e.g. gastrointestinal bleeding,” says Kasper Adelborg, before stating that the new knowledge can be used for even better prevention and individualized treatment:”If a person has a high risk of suffering a blood clot, treatment with anticoagulant medicine can benefit some patients. But anticoagulant medicine is not desirable if the risk of suffering bleeding is higher. This is a difficult clinical problem, but our study can set goals for what carries most weight for each individual type of cancer,” he says.One example is the disease myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), which is a type of bone marrow cancer. Here the study showed that the risk of bleeding within ten years was approx. fifteen per cent, while the risk of suffering a blood prop was lower.last_img read more