first_imgThe worlds of science and art are headed on a collision course, and master forgers are forewarned: Science will catch them red-handed. Notre Dame’s nuclear astrophysicist professors Michael C.F. Wiescher and Philippe Collon are using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) to analyze various artifacts without destroying any parts of the samples. The application of such methods involves dating artwork, determining prior locations of artifacts and identifying pigments through particulate analysis. In so doing, art forgeries are more easily identified and more information about the artifacts is gained, according to Wiescher and Collon’s January article “Accelerated ion beams in art forensics” in the academic magazine Physics Today. This new approach is unique in that it comes from the area of physics. Collon said using AMS is akin to pouring a bottle of wine into Lake Michigan and trying to examine the wine particles, saying the process allows researchers to specifically examine from the backgrounds that interfere in the separations. He said the main focus is to look at a few trace atoms in a large matrix. Collon said he enjoys his focus using the AMS program. “I have a love for astrophysics and nuclear physics,” he said. “I love applying AMS to those areas.” Collon said the accelerators used at Notre Dame are similar to the ones in European art museums, save for the fact that the ones overseas work specifically on art works, forgeries and archeology. He said the majority of research conducted at Notre Dame is related to nuclear astrophysics. Collon added that although the work in the nuclear labs at Notre Dame remains focused on research and experimentation, the professors are now using applied physics in connection to other studies such as art, archeology and anthropology. “It really is a sort of melding of these different areas,” he said. Collon said he and Wiescher are continuously developing these applied physics programs. He said the specific focus on art and archaeology took place more recently in the past four to five years. “This is a program that we’re developing. It’s something that is growing, that is taking on more and more importance,” Collon said. “It’s a sort of parallel to our main activity, which is basic nuclear physics.” Additionally, current undergraduate research focuses on AMS in connection with carbon-14 dating, Collon said. These students are given the opportunity to work with these techniques, most often using the 11 million volt tandem accelerator. Collon said no commercial plans exist for AMS technology. Although the campus science buildings belong to Notre Dame, the National Science Foundation (NSF) pays for the labs. At this time, the NSF would like the lab activity at Notre Dame to continue with its basic research. He said the NSF recognizes the goal of these particular research labs to serve the science community in the widespread study of physics, not just one area alone.last_img read more

first_imgLausanne, Switzerland | AFP |The Court of Arbitration for Sport on Monday rejected an appeal by Michel Platini against a six year ban from football saying it was “not convinced” a $2 million payment from FIFA was legitimate.CAS cut the ban to four years however saying the punishment by FIFA was “too severe.” A fine was also reduced. Platini announced that he would resign as UEFA president. The court “was not convinced by the legitimacy of the 2,000,000 Swiss franc ($2 million, 1.8 million euros) payment, which was only recognised by Mr. Platini and Mr. (Sepp) Blatter, and which occurred more than eight years after the end of his work relations,” said a statement from the tribunal based in Lausanne, Switzerland.“The suspension of Mr. Platini has been lowered from six to four years and the 80,000 Swiss franc fine (reduced) to 60,000,” the court said in ruling on an appeal filed by Platini in FebruaryShare on: WhatsApplast_img read more

first_imgFacebook919Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Olympia Farmers MarketOn Thursday, April 4, the Olympia Farmers Market will celebrate the opening of its 44th season with bell ringing, entertainment and vendor specials.Beginning on Thursday, April 4, the market will operate “High Season” and will be open Thursday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.Though the Olympia Farmers Market has been open on Saturdays through the winter months, April marks the beginning of the growing season with even more vendors offering, local vegetables, Washington grown fruit, prepared food, artisan crafts, with 8 restaurants, set to live music in a family-friendly atmosphere.WHAT — The Olympia Farmers 44th Season Opening DayWHEN —Thursday, April 4 at 10:00 a.m. Bell ringing by Sam Gibboney, Executive Director at the Port of Olympia.WHERE — 700 Capitol Way NFOR MORE INFO —Main Office info@olympaifarmersmarket.com or call (360) 352-9096.ABOUT THE OLYMPIA FARMERS MARKET: In operation since 1975, the Olympia Farmers Market is home to over 80 vendors from around South Puget Sound. In the 152 days of our market season, we see approximately 400,000 visitors.We have a dedicated staff, comprised of two managers and a committed Board of Directors. Our mission is to promote and encourage the development of local, small-scale agriculture and ensure a dynamic market balance for small, local growers and others to make available their products to residents of this community. We are proud to be an active component of the Olympia community for 40 plus years. Centrally located on the waterfront of downtown Olympia, in close proximity to the Hands on Children’s Museum and WET Science Center,  area residents & visitors can enjoy local produce, fresh fruit, artisan crafts, baked goods, meat & dairy, with eight restaurants, all set to daily live music.last_img read more