first_imgThe worlds of science and art are headed on a collision course, and master forgers are forewarned: Science will catch them red-handed. Notre Dame’s nuclear astrophysicist professors Michael C.F. Wiescher and Philippe Collon are using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) to analyze various artifacts without destroying any parts of the samples. The application of such methods involves dating artwork, determining prior locations of artifacts and identifying pigments through particulate analysis. In so doing, art forgeries are more easily identified and more information about the artifacts is gained, according to Wiescher and Collon’s January article “Accelerated ion beams in art forensics” in the academic magazine Physics Today. This new approach is unique in that it comes from the area of physics. Collon said using AMS is akin to pouring a bottle of wine into Lake Michigan and trying to examine the wine particles, saying the process allows researchers to specifically examine from the backgrounds that interfere in the separations. He said the main focus is to look at a few trace atoms in a large matrix. Collon said he enjoys his focus using the AMS program. “I have a love for astrophysics and nuclear physics,” he said. “I love applying AMS to those areas.” Collon said the accelerators used at Notre Dame are similar to the ones in European art museums, save for the fact that the ones overseas work specifically on art works, forgeries and archeology. He said the majority of research conducted at Notre Dame is related to nuclear astrophysics. Collon added that although the work in the nuclear labs at Notre Dame remains focused on research and experimentation, the professors are now using applied physics in connection to other studies such as art, archeology and anthropology. “It really is a sort of melding of these different areas,” he said. Collon said he and Wiescher are continuously developing these applied physics programs. He said the specific focus on art and archaeology took place more recently in the past four to five years. “This is a program that we’re developing. It’s something that is growing, that is taking on more and more importance,” Collon said. “It’s a sort of parallel to our main activity, which is basic nuclear physics.” Additionally, current undergraduate research focuses on AMS in connection with carbon-14 dating, Collon said. These students are given the opportunity to work with these techniques, most often using the 11 million volt tandem accelerator. Collon said no commercial plans exist for AMS technology. Although the campus science buildings belong to Notre Dame, the National Science Foundation (NSF) pays for the labs. At this time, the NSF would like the lab activity at Notre Dame to continue with its basic research. He said the NSF recognizes the goal of these particular research labs to serve the science community in the widespread study of physics, not just one area alone.last_img read more

first_img “The amount of balls we put into the box, a little deflection would have suited us, but unfortunately they got it.” Ireland head into September’s double-header against Gibraltar and Georgia knowing their qualification hopes have been dealt a significant blow, but one which in Coleman’s eyes at least, is not yet fatal. He said: “We’re still two points behind Scotland, but we were very disappointed in there. But Scotland have a couple of tough games coming up, we have tough games coming up – we have just got to look at the next game. “We’ll look forward to September and try to win them. I know they are cliched answers you are getting from me, but we can’t give up on this group and I think we are still in it. “Obviously three points would have been a lot better than one. A lot of people said it was must-win, but we won’t give up hope just yet.” Asked what O’Neill’s reaction had been in the dressing room afterwards, Everton full-back Coleman said: “Like everyone else, he’s disappointed, as you can imagine, any manager’s reaction straight after that. “We were going to keep it tight and then we concede 45 seconds in, so we got a bit of a slap on the wrist for that, and rightly so. “As professional players, that shouldn’t be happening 45 seconds into the second half. We have to take that on the chin. You can do all the stuff on the training ground you want, but you can’t really let that happen so early in the second half.” Maloney’s early second-half strike cancelled out Jon Walters’ 38th-minute opener which had given Ireland a deserved lead, and frontman Daryl Murphy was unable to cap a fine individual display with the goal his efforts deserved despite being presented with a series of passable opportunities. The Republic were ultimately frustrated as a game they desperately needed to win – and probably should have won – ended all-square. Coleman said: “To have all your hard work in the first half undone very, very early in the second half is massively disappointing, and it’s hard to take. It feels like a defeat, to be honest. “Obviously it’s not a good start, conceding so early in the half – that was poor from our point of view – and then the normal reaction after conceding so early is that they are going to be on top for a little bit. “But we did ride it out a little bit and Murph had a great chance, and it would have been great to make it 2-1. Robbie [Brady] played some great balls into the box a few times and we peppered their goal, and they just got that little bit of luck that we didn’t. Press Association Coleman and his team-mates had to make do with a point from their Group D showdown with Scotland at the Aviva Stadium on Saturday evening as they were caught with a sucker punch two minutes after the restart which handed the visitors a 1-1 draw they barely deserved. To manager Martin O’Neill’s horror, Scottish midfielder Shaun Maloney, who scored the only goal in the reverse fixture in Glasgow in November, was allowed to play a one-two on the edge of the penalty area and fire home an equaliser off luckless defender John O’Shea. Seamus Coleman has admitted the Republic of Ireland must learn from their mistakes if they are to keep alive their hopes of making it to the Euro 2016 finals. last_img read more