first_imgThe worlds of science and art are headed on a collision course, and master forgers are forewarned: Science will catch them red-handed. Notre Dame’s nuclear astrophysicist professors Michael C.F. Wiescher and Philippe Collon are using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) to analyze various artifacts without destroying any parts of the samples. The application of such methods involves dating artwork, determining prior locations of artifacts and identifying pigments through particulate analysis. In so doing, art forgeries are more easily identified and more information about the artifacts is gained, according to Wiescher and Collon’s January article “Accelerated ion beams in art forensics” in the academic magazine Physics Today. This new approach is unique in that it comes from the area of physics. Collon said using AMS is akin to pouring a bottle of wine into Lake Michigan and trying to examine the wine particles, saying the process allows researchers to specifically examine from the backgrounds that interfere in the separations. He said the main focus is to look at a few trace atoms in a large matrix. Collon said he enjoys his focus using the AMS program. “I have a love for astrophysics and nuclear physics,” he said. “I love applying AMS to those areas.” Collon said the accelerators used at Notre Dame are similar to the ones in European art museums, save for the fact that the ones overseas work specifically on art works, forgeries and archeology. He said the majority of research conducted at Notre Dame is related to nuclear astrophysics. Collon added that although the work in the nuclear labs at Notre Dame remains focused on research and experimentation, the professors are now using applied physics in connection to other studies such as art, archeology and anthropology. “It really is a sort of melding of these different areas,” he said. Collon said he and Wiescher are continuously developing these applied physics programs. He said the specific focus on art and archaeology took place more recently in the past four to five years. “This is a program that we’re developing. It’s something that is growing, that is taking on more and more importance,” Collon said. “It’s a sort of parallel to our main activity, which is basic nuclear physics.” Additionally, current undergraduate research focuses on AMS in connection with carbon-14 dating, Collon said. These students are given the opportunity to work with these techniques, most often using the 11 million volt tandem accelerator. Collon said no commercial plans exist for AMS technology. Although the campus science buildings belong to Notre Dame, the National Science Foundation (NSF) pays for the labs. At this time, the NSF would like the lab activity at Notre Dame to continue with its basic research. He said the NSF recognizes the goal of these particular research labs to serve the science community in the widespread study of physics, not just one area alone.last_img read more

first_imgPeep some fall foliage via cycling the Blue Ridge Parkway As we make our way into mid to late October, the visual evidence of the changing season is hard to ignore. For some, autumn is just a ‘shoulder season’ between summer and winter riding; but for others, autumn is what they look forward to all year. The beauty of the Southern Appalachian Mountains is only enhanced by the delicate palette Mother Nature pulls out during that fleeting moment in fall. Like she is sorry to take it all away come winter so she gives us one last fireworks show.Even if you aren’t particularly enamored by the colors of seasonal transition, take advantage of the cool weather and low humidity by getting up into the higher elevations. The best, albeit not the easiest, way to do this is by taking a cycling tour on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Luckily, there is now a Blue Ridge Parkway Travel Guide app for iPhone and Android phones.The best elevations for fall color likely will be in the 2,000-4,000 range, but even if you are looking down on it, the leaves will still be spectacular wherever you are. Just driving on the Parkway and stopping at the pullouts would get you an eyeful, but getting in the saddle to ride up is much more satisfying. Two of the best sections to ride at the southern end of the BRP are between Black Balsam and the Parkway’s highest point at Richland Balsam or the engineering marvel of the Linn Cove Viaduct coming out of Blowing Rock. Both provide sweeping panoramas and are less strenuous than other quad-busting sections.View Weekend Cycling BRP in a larger maplast_img read more

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

first_imgThe Batesville Boy’s Varsity Tennis Team defeated Lawrenceburg 5-0 on Thursday.#1 Singles- Beau Brown defeated Andrew Budd 6-0, 6-1#2 Singles- Blake Walsman defeated Max Martin 6-0, 6-0#3 Singles- Ben Schwettman won by forefit#1 Doubles- Matthew Taylor and Spencer Rose defeated Eathn Grimes and Chris Barnashed 6-0, 6-0#2 Doubles- Harsh Patel and Paul Ritter defeated Ross Bezold and Cotton Vinup 6-0, 6-0.Batesville is now 5-0 on the season and 4-0 in the EIAC. The Bulldogs will play South Dearborn at home on Monday.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Mike McKinneylast_img