first_imgNicholas ‘The Axeman’ Walters, the Jamaican boxing star, is learning the hard way that although he can knock out opponents on a regular basis, (he has done so 21 times in 27 fights), it is much more difficult to win a negotiating battle with 84-year-old, Bob Arum.Arum is the head of Top Rank, one of the most successful boxing promoting companies in the world.For the past year, a fight between Walters, who until recently held the World Boxing Association (WBA) featherweight super title and Vasyl Lomachenko, the World Boxing Organization (WBO) featherweight champion, has been one of the talking points in boxing circles.The plot one heard from time to time was for Walters and Lomachenko to meet different boxers on the same fight card, and presuming that both fighters won, they would then move into a mega clash with each other.Things took an unlikely turn, however, when Walters lost his title on the scales at the Madison Square Garden weigh-in on June 12, 2015, for a fight scheduled for the next day against Miguel Marriaga.He won that fight convincingly, but the all-important title was no longer his, and this weakened his bargaining power in the negotiations.December 19 drawOn December 19 last year in his next fight, this time as a super featherweight (130 pounds) against Jason Sosa, he ended up with a draw decision. The consensus was that he did win that fight, but the records speak loudly, and his bargaining power again dropped a notch.Promoter Arum decided to fast-forward the proposed Walters versus Lomachenko fight and negotiations started. There was, however, a difference with those negotiations. Instead of being carried out by his long-time manager, Jacques Deschamps, Walters himself took over.There has been some unease in his camp, because Walters was of the view that his purse for the Nonito Donaire title fight was not enough.Deschamps told The Gleaner that it was in fact lower than he would normally have gone for, but he took the strategic decision to accept what was offered, confident that Walters would win the title and boost his future bargaining and earning power.The mission was accomplished when Walters stopped Donaire in six rounds and became a super champion, but Walters was still unhappy and decided that he wanted to do his own negotiations.Information is that Walters did not do a good job with those subsequent negotiations. When the offer to fight Lomachenko came about, however, Walters decided to go for broke.Arum has stated publicly that the Walters demand to fight Lomachenko is for US$1million, a price he is not willing to pay. The Gleaner understands that Arum offered him US$550,000 instead, but Walters has refused that offer. They have been unable to come to any agreement, and last word is that Arum has moved on and is negotiating with WBO Super featherweight champion Roman Martinez to fight Lomachenko instead on June 11.The Gleaner has been unable to contact Walters for a comment as his telephone goes to voice mail and he has not responded to requests for a return call.His father, Job, told The Gleaner yesterday that he knows of the negotiations and he, too, believes that Walters is worth more than is being offered by Arum.He is, however, hopeful that regardless of what happens now, the fight will eventually take place.last_img read more

first_imgTORRANCE: Judge calls William Marshall “evil” and says he should be housed in a maximum security prison. By Denise Nix STAFF WRITER William Marshall sat in court Friday staring at a black leather Bible on the table in front of him with his hands chained to his waist. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.He never once looked up. Not when Robin Hoynes’ sisters described the hole he tore in their family by killing her 23 years ago. Not when the prosecutor reiterated how “heinous, horrible” the murder of the 21-year-old Whittier woman was at a Kentucky Fried Chicken in Torrance. And not when Torrance Superior Court Judge Mark Arnold told him he was “evil” and sent him to prison for the rest of his life without the possibility of parole. Marshall, 46, a former state Department of Forestry fire captain, did briefly glance at his family before he was led away by bailiffs. Neither Marshall, his attorney nor his family members spoke during the sentencing hearing. However, his attorney said he would appeal the conviction and sentence. A jury convicted Marshall on Oct. 5 of murder and the special circumstance of killing during an attempted robbery. On Friday, Robin’s sisters told how their lives changed with her death. They lamented the special occasions, rites of passage and everyday joys – like walks in the park and cups of coffee – they were robbed of sharing with her. Tricia Van Voorhis, who is three years younger than Robin, berated Marshall for his lack of guilt or remorse. “It is beyond my comprehension how you can do this in the first place. But how can you live with yourself after?” Van Voorhis said she hopes he spends “day after day and year after year” in his cell thinking about the pain he’s caused. Kim Hoynes, the oldest sister, recalled how her sister’s murder devastated her parents. Their father, who suffered from emphysema, committed suicide a decade later. Their mother, who now has many of her own health problems, grieved quietly. She read from a letter the family sent to District Attorney Steve Cooley in 2005 in which their mother, Ethel Hoynes, wrote: “A day never goes by that I do not miss my precious freckle-faced Robin and wish she were here.” Wendy Castaneda, the youngest sister, spoke of how she continues to grieve for her best friend. “The truth is you can never make restitution for your actions because you can never bring Robin back,” she said to Marshall. All the sisters remembered how Robin had dedicated much of her life to her church and religion. Castaneda also acknowledged Marshall’s faith as he brought a Bible to court every day. “If you truly believe and embrace the truth of the Bible ? then I have to believe that at least you’re sorry for what you did and would express that to my family.” Deputy District Attorney John Lewin noted that the anniversary of Hoynes’ death is only days away. She’s now been dead more years than she was alive, he said. “The life she lived, even in that short a time, impacted many people,” he said. Lewin said it was difficult to conceive how Marshall could selfishly plan and execute his crime against a woman he knew and who was nothing but nice to him. “It just didn’t matter. It didn’t matter to you,” Lewin said to Marshall. Marshall had worked with Robin at the restaurant until shortly before her Oct. 30, 1984, murder. The assistant manager was fired for a number of reasons, including suspicions he was stealing from the restaurant. Robin, who was alone doing paperwork after closing, let Marshall in. She was expecting him to turn in his uniform and pick up a briefcase he left behind. When she turned away from him, he stabbed her twice in the back. He tried to open a floor safe, but the combination had been changed. Before he left, he slit her throat. In the days following the crime, Marshall was seen casing a Fountain Valley Kentucky Fried Chicken where he also had worked. When he was first arrested on Nov. 10, 1984, he had two knives and gloves with him and was wearing camouflage pants and boots. The boots, which were kept by the Torrance Police Department when Marshall was released, later became a key piece of evidence in the case. A piece of foam found at the murder scene was linked to the boots. On Friday before the judge handed down the sentence, Arnold said he was “saddened” for the way Marshall “eviscerated” Robin’s close-knit and loving family and shortened a life that was bound for great things. He said the way Marshall stabbed Robin in the back was “cowardly” and he showed a “lack of humanity” by his willingness to try to commit the same crime days later. Arnold said he would recommend that Marshall be housed in a maximum security prison “in accordance with the seriousness of the crime and the level of evil he has exhibited.” denise.nix@dailybreeze.com Staff writer Laura Davis contributed to this article. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more