first_imgThe Japanese automaker giant, Toyota Motor Corp. will join hands with Uber to work collectively on autonomous autos. Toyota will make an investment of about $500 million and will value Uber at $72 billion to get self-driving cars on the road. Toyota aims to improve security and decrease transportation prices with this initiative. As for Uber, it’s a chance to redeem itself in the budding autonomous transportation sector. As a part of the alliance, Toyota will manufacture Sienna vehicles, which will be equipped with Uber’s self-driving technology, and another company will operate the fleet, said a source familiar with the project. The third partner has yet to be identified. Consumers can expect “mass-production” of self-driving vehicles that would be deployed on Uber’s ride sharing network. Source: BBC.com After Uber withdrew its self-driving cars owing to the autonomous Uber SUV that killed a pedestrian in a fatal crash in Tempe, Arizona, in March, the investment is a ray of hope for the company and its users. With this, Uber consumers’ growing apprehension that Uber is pulling out of the self-driving car space will be finally put to rest. As for the Uber’s investors, this collaboration will come as a relief especially after it was reported earlier this month that Uber was sinking around $1m-$2m into its autonomy work every single day thanks to the fatal crash and the expensive lawsuit that followed. This $500 billion project is expected to be piloted in 2021. The potential of self-driving cars to power car-sharing services represents a major challenge in an industry dominated by individual car ownership. For Toyota, it presents an opportunity to reinvent itself from a car maker to a mobility platform. “This agreement and investment marks an important milestone in our transformation to a mobility company as we help provide a path for safe and secure expansion of mobility services like ride-sharing.”-Shigeki Tomoyama, executive vice president of Toyota Motor Corporation Toyota has been lagging behind in the scene of self driving cars, while Uber’s troubled self-driving car efforts are in desperate need of external help. It would, therefore, be interesting to see how this joint collaboration works in favour of both, Toyota and Uber. For more details on this story, head over to Fortune’s coverage of this news. Read Next Apple self-driving cars are back! VoxelNet may drive the autonomous vehicles MIT’s Duckietown Kickstarter project aims to make learning how to program self-driving cars affordable Tesla is building its own AI hardware for self-driving carslast_img read more

first_imgJust when Google is facing large walkouts and protests against its policies, another consumer group has lodged a complaint against Google’s user tracking. According to a report published by the European Consumer Organisation (BEUC), Google is using various methods to encourage users to enable the settings ‘location history’ and ‘web and app activity’ which are integrated into all Google user accounts. They allege that Google is using these features to facilitate targeted advertising. BEUC and its members including those from the Czech Republic, Greece, Norway, Slovenia, and Sweden argue that what Google is doing is in breach of the GDPR. Per the report, BEUC says “We argue that consumers are deceived into being tracked when they use Google services. This happens through a variety of techniques, including withholding or hiding information, deceptive design practices, and bundling of services. We argue that these practices are unethical, and that they in our opinion are in breach of European data protection legislation because they fail to fulfill the conditions for lawful data processing.” Android users are generally unaware of the fact that their Location History or Web & App Activity is enabled. Google uses a variety of dark patterns, to collect the exact location of the user, including the latitude (e.g. floor of the building) and mode of transportation, both outside and inside, to serve targeted advertising. Moreover, there is no real option to turn off Location History, only to pause it. Even if the user has kept Location History disabled, their location will still be shared with Google through Web & App Activity. “If you pause Location history, we make clear that — depending on your individual phone and app settings — we might still collect and use location data to improve your Google experience.” said a Google spokesman to Reuters. “These practices are not compliant with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), as Google lacks a valid legal ground for processing the data in question. In particular, the report shows that users’ consent provided under these circumstances is not freely given,” BEUC, speaking on behalf of the countries’ consumer groups, said. Google claims to have a legitimate interest in serving ads based on personal data, but the fact that location data is collected, and how it is used, is not clearly expressed to the user. BEUC calls out Google saying that the company’s legitimate interest in serving advertising as part of its business model overrides the data subject’s fundamental right to privacy. BEUC argues that in light of how Web & App Activity is presented to users, the interests of the data subject should take precedence. Reuters asked for comment on the consumer groups’ complaints to a Google spokesman. According to them, “Location History is turned off by default, and you can edit, delete, or pause it at any time. If it’s on, it helps to improve services like predicted traffic on your commute. We’re constantly working to improve our controls, and we’ll be reading this report closely to see if there are things we can take on board,”. People are largely supportive of BEUC on the allegations they made on Google. However, some people feel that it is just another attack on Google. If people voluntarily and most of them knowingly use these services and consent to giving personal information, it should not be a concern for any third party. “I can’t help but think that there’s some competitors’ money behind these attacks on Google. They provide location services which you can turn off or delete yourself, which is anonymous to anyone else, and there’s no evidence they sell your data (they just anonymously connect you to businesses you search for). Versus carriers which track you without an option to opt-in or out and actually do sell your data to 3rd parties.” “If the vast majority of customers don’t know arithmetic, then yes, that’s exactly what happened. Laws are a UX problem, not a theory problem. If most of your users end up getting deceived, you can’t say “BUT IT WAS ALL RIGHT THERE IN THE SMALL PRINT, IT’S NOT MY FAULT THEY DIDN’T READ IT!”. Like, this is literally how everything else works.” Read the full conversation on Hacker news. You may also go through the full “Every step you take” report published by BEUC for more information. Read Next Google employees join hands with Amnesty International urging Google to drop Project Dragonfly. Is Anti-trust regulation coming to Facebook following fake news inquiry made by a global panel in the House of Commons, UK? Google hints shutting down Google News over EU’s implementation of Article 11 or the “link tax”last_img read more

first_img Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Top Stories NASHVILLE – “You know what, I’ll just keep ’em. I won’t sell those for that.”Those words actually came out of my mouth about 13 years ago when I haggled over basically nothing at garage sale I had (shudders).In relocating to a new house, my then-wife and I thought it was a good idea to pare down the things we’d no longer use or wear in our new abode. For me, there were several items that fit the bill. Related LinksHistory helped Cardinals GM Keim fall in love with Kyler MurrayCardinals’ Kingsbury: Kyler Murray is rarely-seen dynamic, unique talentCardinals GM Keim to Kyler Murray: ‘We need you to ignite this offense’Cardinals’ potential Josh Rosen trade partners snap up QBs in draftWhy? Because the whole world knows the Cardinals no longer want Rosen. You can’t become the first franchise in 36 years to invest back-to-back first-round picks in quarterbacks and then continue to publicly say “we value Josh Rosen,” like Keim told ESPN’s Josina Anderson Thursday night. The endorsement rings hollow. Nobody’s going to fall for that verbal attempt to keep his stock high.Keim spoke of depth at the quarterback position, but honestly, does that even really exist? Many teams don’t have a viable starter, let alone a backup that can generate the kind of trade return the Cardinals were seeking.By keeping information about their intentions with the top pick very guarded, the Cardinals created a very small window to find a taker for Rosen, thus keeping the possibility of both first-round quarterbacks on the roster for an extended period. The Cardinals start OTAs in early May.Can you say ‘awkward?’I should’ve sold my shoes for two bucks instead of getting nothing before giving them away.The Cardinals, who already in a way admitted they swung and missed on Rosen for their purposes, should’ve done the same on draft night. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling 96 Comments   Share   center_img The Arizona Cardinals first round picks the past two seasons. Josh Rosen, left, and Kyler Murray, right. (Getty Images) The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo – / 52 What I was talking about in the above quote was a pair of Nike basketball shoes, several years old but gently used and in good shape. The price tag was five dollars. The cash-conscious browser offered two.I held to my word. The shoes didn’t sell. I think I ended up donating them years later.When the Arizona Cardinals drafted Kyler Murray with the number-one overall pick in the first round of the NFL Draft Thursday night, the gently used and in-good-shape Josh Rosen became the human embodiment of those Nike basketball shoes.Arizona general manager Steve Keim is me for the purposes of this comparison. The browsing bargain shopper is basically every other front office in the NFL.Reports circulated late Thursday that the reason why Keim couldn’t unload his 2018 first-round selection and “quarterback of the future” is that he is asking for too much in return. Keim wants a first-round pick and nobody was willing to give that.Heck, the New York Giants and Washington Redskins, both in need of a quarterback, opted to use draft picks on Daniel Jones (6th) and Dwayne Haskins (15th) on signal callers instead of trading for Rosen.Yeah, they opted to buy new shoes instead of getting the used ones. And honestly, as much as I have faith that Rosen isn’t the quarterback we saw struggle all of last year, both organizations were right to shop elsewhere. Arizona Cardinals2019 Draft BoardRoundPick #PlayerPos.11Kyler MurrayQB21Byron MurphyCB230Andy IsabellaWR31Zach AllenDE41Hakeem ButlerWR51Deionte ThompsonS61KeeSean JohnsonWR66Lamont GaillardC734*Joshua MilesT735*Michael DogbeDE740*Caleb WilsonTE* = Compensatory Selection© STATS – 2019last_img read more

first_imgAugust 18, 2007 IT’S A BOY … Congratulations to the Begin-Tollas family, Nadia, Dave and their 10-year old son Tristan, on the birth of their newest family member. Nadia Begin with Paolo Soleri on August 8. 2007. Nadia made table decorations for the E.A.R. concert on August 11. 2007. [Photo & text: sa] The baby was born yesterday, August 16., around 5 o’clock in the afternoon, right during a thunder and lightning storm. He weighed 9 lbs 10 oz. Birth took place in the Begin-Tollas residence, the west foundry apartment, with guidance of a mid-wife. Mother and child are healthy and in good spirits. [Photo & text: sa] Welcome !!! More story and photos soon! [Photo & text: sa]last_img

first_imgJonathan PogrundContent security and middleware technology provider Viaccess-Orca’s EMEA director of sales Jonathan Pogrund will use his presence at ANGA COM to highlight Viaccess-Orca’s ability to support cloud-based delivery of TV Everywhere.Pogrund will participate in a technology panel to explain how a cloud platform as a service (PaaS) approach helps pay TV operators and content providers stay competitive in today’s evolving industry by enabling them to launch new services and business models for a wide range of end-devices with speed and cost efficiency, according to Viaccess-Orca.The technology panel will be moderated by Guy Bisson, Research Director at Ampere Analysis and will take place in Room B on Thursday June 9 at 14:45.During the session, Pogrund will provide an overview of the lessons learned using cloud for TV Everywhere services, based on the launch of Viaccess-Orca’s new Voyage – TV Everywhere as a Service (TVaaS). The session will explore the benefits, challenges, and approaches of relying on the cloud for OTT multiscreen delivery, highlighting monetisation opportunities and operational efficiencies that can be achieved with a cloud-based TV PaaS, according to the company. An outline of a simplified operational workflow that allows operators to manage, publish, personalise, and monetise content securely on multiple devices will also be provided.last_img read more

first_imgShareTweet POLICE have confirmed that the man who died following a one vehicle road traffic collision last night Dripps. #The accident happened on the Roguery Road, Toomebridge. The 22-year-old was originally from the Magherafelt area. A PSNI spokesperson said: “Enquiries are continuing and police would continue to appeal for information or anyone with dash-cam footage to contact them on 101, quoting reference number 1462 14/5/19.”The road was closed for a period while the scene was examined but has since been re-opened.Co Derry man Calvin Dripps tragically dies in one vehicle road crash was last modified: May 15th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags:center_img Co Derry man Calvin Dripps tragically dies in one vehicle road crashmagherafeltRoguery RoadTOOMEBRIDGElast_img read more

first_imgCanadian-born psychologist Jay Van Bavel likes Canadian beer.”I can’t say what it is,” he says, laughing, “I just love the taste.”When Van Bavel sips a beer from his hometown, there is a feedback between his taste buds and his brain. He’s reminded of his Canadian-ness, he feels more Canadian, and Canadian beer tastes better to him than other beers.So suggests a recent study in the Journal of Social Psychology, authored by Van Bavel, social psychologist at New York University and his colleagues. The researchers found that the stronger your sense of social identity, the more you are likely to enjoy the food associated with that identity.The subjects of this study were Southerners and Canadians, two groups with proud food traditions.The first experiment, containing 103 people, found that the more strongly someone self-identifies as Southern, the more they would expect Southern food to taste good, food like fried catfish or black-eyed peas.In a second experiment, containing 151 people, researchers also found that when Southerners were reminded of their Southernness — primed, in psychology speak — their perception of the tastiness of Southern food was even higher. That is, the more Southern a person was feeling at that moment, the better the food tasted.They found a similar result when taste-testing with Canadians, finding that Canadian test subjects only preferred the taste of maple syrup over honey in trials when they were first reminded of their Canadian identity.Van Bavel says that this study shows that how you feel while eating affects your perception of how food tastes. Food preferences, like identities, are flexible and can change based on your environment.”Southerners like Southern food, and that’s not really surprising, but that’s especially true when their Southern identity is activated,” says Van Bavel. “If you were to activate a different identity, someone might have different preferences in that moment.”The researchers are not entirely sure why this happens.One possibility is that people are more sensitive to the different dimensions of the food when it’s associated with their identity. Another idea is that familiar foods are self-affirming and therefore thought of as good.”It’s entirely possible that people will just import anything that reminds them of their identity as more positive,” says Van Bavel.The relationship between identity and food preference is not new. However, the use of priming to induce identity makes this study different from its predecessors.”Priming is like opening a filing drawer and bringing to your attention all the things that are in the drawer,” says Paul Rozin, food psychologist at University of Pennsylvania, who was not involved in the study. “You can’t really change peoples’ identities in a 15-minute setting, but you can make one of their identities more salient, and that’s what they’ve done in this study.”The study helps us understand how people make complex food decisions in society with a great diversity of options.And these food decisions start at an early age. Katherine Kinzler, psychology professor at Cornell University, recently published a study that shows that 12-month old babies prefer to eat a food when they see someone eat it who speaks their native language, as opposed to someone who speaks a foreign language.”I think they’re definitely looking out into the world and asking, ‘What is my in-group eating and what aren’t they eating?'” she says. “They’re learning about the cultural norms of food selection really early in life.”Understanding the link between food preferences and identity can help us to better understand why people eat what they eat, and a better awareness of the cultural dimensions of food choices can improve strategies to get people to eat healthier.”Instead of just trying to insert healthy objects into menus, you might have to re-market healthy foods around an identity to make them have an impact,” says Van Bavel. “Ignoring identity makes food and health problems harder to solve.”Nutritionist and personal trainer Erika Nicole Kendall, founder of the blog A Black Girl’s Guide to Weight Loss, thinks a lot about how to give nutrition advice that is sensitive to a person’s cultural identity. In her work, she encourages people to seek out their cultural foods.”When people are trying to eat better, going back to their culture’s foods is the best way to commit to what they’re doing,” she says, “because the commitment is more than weight loss or heart health – it’s also a commitment to their own roots.”Something as simple as a food pyramid has identity implications. The food pyramid most Americans are used to – a little candy on top, a lot of bread and grains at the bottom – reflects a mainstream American diet, but may not resonate with everyone. Japan’s food pyramid is a spinning top that highlights the importance of tea, and India’s food pyramid has a special section for pulses (think lentils).Identity is at the core of our food choices, whether we realize it or not.Kendall is an 8th-generation Southerner. She says she is continuously drawn to Southern foods and flavors, “I am always looking for ways to connect with different elements of who I am,” she says, “and with different elements of my culture and my country.”As a nutritionist, she encourages clients to seek out their family’s traditional recipes, and then works with them to find healthy alternatives that contain the flavors and textures of their cultural foods.”It’s good for you,” she says, “but there’s also meaning there.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

first_imgFebruary’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which left 17 dead and 17 more wounded, horrified people across the country, spurring student walkouts and marches in support of stricter gun control laws, including universal, comprehensive background checks and a ban on assault weapons. But gun debates in the United States have proven to be contentious and intractable. Even as thousands rally for new legislation, opponents contend that such measures won’t prevent determined criminals from obtaining a firearm and that responsible gun ownership makes communities safer.In charting a course forward, it is necessary to move beyond “people’s anecdotal opinions,” says David Hemenway, director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. He and other researchers are analyzing data and conducting studies with the ultimate goal of informing public policy. It’s a tough task, in part because of a by now well-known piece of legislation called the Dickey Amendment, passed by Congress in 1996 with the support of the National Rifle Association. This amendment prevented the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from using funds “to advocate or promote gun control.” It didn’t ban federally-funded gun research, but the legislation had a chilling effect: from 1996 to 2013, CDC funding in this area dropped by 96 percent.Against this backdrop, it can be easy to overlook an important fact: Research into gun violence has actually increased in recent years, rising from fewer than 90 annual publications in 2010 to 150 in 2014. Universities, think tanks, private philanthropy –even the state of California — have offered support. And in late April, governors from six northeastern states and Puerto Rico announced plans to launch a research consortium to study the issue. A December 2017 policy article published in the journal Science describes a “surge” of recent scientific publications.”The scope and quality of gun-related research is growing, with clear implications for the policy debate,” write the authors, a pair of researchers from Duke and Stanford. This research has generated significant findings about suicide, intimate partner violence, community health, and the effect of various state-level gun laws.A leading cause of deathMore than 36,000 people are killed by gunshot in the U.S. every year, making it a leading cause of death in the country, comparable to motor vehicle incidents. Among those deaths, nearly two-thirds are suicides. “A gun in the home increases the risk of someone in that home dying from suicide maybe threefold, and the evidence is overwhelming,” Hemenway says.A conventional view holds that if people really want to kill themselves, they will find a way to do it — with or without a gun. Yet the data suggest that households with guns do not differ from those without guns when it comes to mental health risk for suicide. Instead, the difference seems to stem from the fact that suicide attempts with a gun are usually fatal, unlike attempts with pills, for example. Putting time and distance between a suicidal person and a gun can save that person’s life.This line of thinking is supported by a study published in the Journal of Surgical Research, which found that states with weaker gun laws have more gun-related suicide attempts, which tend to be associated with higher mortality. Dr. Rodrigo Alban, a surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, and his colleagues analyzed data on nearly 35,000 subjects spanning 14 years. Almost two-thirds of the firearm suicide attempts occurred in states with the lowest scores for policies regulating guns from the nonprofit Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence — mostly states in the South and West. These states had little to no gun legislation, such as background checks, concealed weapons laws, and safe storage laws.Of course, correlation doesn’t imply causation, and Alban and his co-authors identify a need for research that pinpoints which particular laws have the greatest effect on reducing suicide attempts. But in the meantime, in light of these findings, they conclude that, “Efforts aimed at nationwide standardization of firearm state laws are warranted.”The riskiest gun ownersAnother route to reducing gun violence, academics suggest, is to identify risk factors that increase a person’s chances of harming themselves or others. Such individuals could then be considered for gun violence restraining orders. This was the logic behind the 1968 Gun Control Act, which specified narrow categories of people disqualified from buying or owning guns, including convicted felons and people committed to mental institutions. The 1994 Violence Against Women Act and the subsequent Lautenberg Amendment were written to bolster protections for victims of domestic violence.But these laws only apply to people who are currently or formerly married, live or have lived together, or have shared children. Susan Sorenson, a professor of social policy and public health at the University of Pennsylvania, finds in recent research that they fail to protect a growing portion of the population who are in dating relationships, who can be just as violent.A separate study led by Carolina Díez of Boston University assessed state laws and confirms Sorenson’s conclusions. Domestic violence homicide rates drop by 10 percent in states prohibiting intimate partners with restraining orders from owning guns and requiring them to relinquish them.Some states have gone a step further and passed so-called “risk-warrant” laws. In 1999, Connecticut became the first to pass such legislation allowing police to obtain a warrant to temporarily remove guns from someone who poses an imminent hazard to themselves or others. Dr. Garen Wintemute, an emergency room physician at the University of California, Davis Medical Center and director of the Violence Prevention Research Program, advocates for gun violence restraining orders based, in part, on a 2016 evaluation of Connecticut’s law.Wintemute points to individual cases where such laws would have made a difference: “The Parkland shooter was making all kinds of public pronouncements,” he says. “A gun violence restraining order would’ve allowed his family or law enforcement to go to a judge and get an order that would’ve gotten that gun taken away from him and prevented the shooting.”The remaining research gapFollowing the barrage of nearly daily shootings, some researchers have begun to call for a community-wide approach, rather than only focusing on high-risk individuals. Charles Branas, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, says that poverty can contribute to gun violence within communities.In their latest research, Branas and his colleagues examined hundreds of vacant land plots and abandoned buildings in U.S. cities, with a focus on Philadelphia. These abandoned spaces, like old parking lots and homes, often become places to store illegal firearms. Millions of people live near and walk by these spaces, which can cause community members to feel unsafe or stressed. Using a randomized control design, Branas found that interventions such as planting trees and plants and boarding up windows and doors can make a difference.”Gun violence can be sustainably reduced in poor neighborhoods of those cities by as much as 29 percent,” he says. “These cost peanuts. The return on investment is very high, because shootings are very expensive events.”For all the progress made in gun violence research, gaps still remain. In March, the RAND Corporation released a meta-analysis of thousands of studies published since 2003. The report states that, “Federal funding for research on gun-related mortality is far below levels for other sources of mortality in the United States.” As a result, more research is warranted in virtually all aspects of gun control policy, including on officer-involved shootings, defensive gun use, gun-free zones, the gun industry, and lost or stolen firearms, to name a few.The latest federal budget, passed by Congress and signed by President Trump in March, may offer some assistance, as it technically allows the CDC to fund research on gun violence. It doesn’t reverse the Dickey Amendment, however, and CDC officials may still face resistance when trying to support such research. In any case, it’s ultimately up to lawmakers — and the public they answer to — to determine how to balance Second Amendment rights with scientific data.”Hopefully these policy debates have some science behind them,” Hemenway says. “Everything we learn should matter and should have an effect.”Ramin Skibba is an astrophysicist turned science writer based in San Diego. He has written for Newsweek, Slate, Scientific American, Nature, Science, among other publications. He can be reached on Twitter at @raminskibba.This article was originally published on Undark. Copyright 2018 Undark Magazine. To see more, visit Undark Magazine.last_img read more

first_imgThe long-running breast milk vs. formula debate made headlines earlier this week.The New York Times reported that the Trump administration had tried to remove language from a WHO resolution that would, according to reporter Andrew Jacobs, “promote and protect breastfeeding around the world, especially in developing countries” and limit the promotion of infant formula.President Donald Trump tweeted his rationale for the U.S. position: “The failing NY Times Fake News story today about breast feeding must be called out. The U.S. strongly supports breast feeding but we don’t believe women should be denied access to formula. Many women need this option because of malnutrition and poverty.”Public health professionals have a different perspective: In poor countries, a mother’s decision about breastfeeding can be critical for her baby’s survival. That’s because formula carries special risks for low-income families.The first problem arises because powdered formula requires a dependable source of clean water, which is not available to some 780 million people, according to the World Health Organization. “In countries where women live in poor households with poor sanitation, it becomes a matter of life and death,” says Rafael Perez-Escamilla, director of Global Health Concentration at the Yale School of Public Health. “If the water is not clean, formula becomes a death sentence for the infant.”Even in the best of circumstances, formula feeding has disadvantages. According to decades of research analyzed and summarized in a 2016 Lancet series on breastfeeding, the harm caused by formula feeding includes increased risk of diarrhea and respiratory infections. In addition, according to the Lancet series, more than 800,000 formula-fed infants who die each year could be saved by breastfeeding mostly by reducing diarrhea, respiratory infections and malnutrition from diluted formula. Breast milk has been proven, over decades of research, to be unarguably the best nutrition for babies with its nearly perfect mix of easily digested vitamins, protein and fat. In addition, new research in the July 2017 JAMA Pediatrics has shown that beneficial bacteria from the mother colonize in the baby’s gut, helping the infant establish a healthy microbiome — bacteria in the intestine that help fight disease throughout life. Because the bacteria are unique to mother and baby, the establishment of the microbiome has been called nature’s first personalized medicine and cannot be replicated in formula.Harms from formula-feeding fall disproportionately on poor women in poor countries, says Perez-Escamilla, not only because of unsanitary drinking water but also because of poverty. Purchasing formula can use 30 percent or more of an impoverished family’s income, he says. “Then, women start diluting the formula to make it last longer,” he says. Drinking watered down formula leads to malnourishment, illness and even death. “And then, too, the money spent on formula is not available for other things the baby might need, like health care,” he says.No additional research is needed to prove that breast milk is the gold standard of nutrition for infants, says Dr. Adriano Cattaneo, an epidemiologist retired from the Unit for Health Services Research and International Health, Institute for Child Health “Burio Garofolo,” in Trieste, Italy.He has grown tired of pointing out and defending the proven benefits of breast milk for mothers and babies. “From a scientific point of view, carrying out research on the benefits of breastfeeding doesn’t make sense. Would anybody carry out research on the benefits of breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool?” says Cattaneo.”The burden of proof should fall on those who propose alternatives to breastfeeding,” Cattaneo says in an email interview with NPR. “Formula feeding lags far behind … breastfeeding in terms of safety and benefits. So we should never talk of the benefits of breastfeeding. We should talk about the harms of formula feeding.”Cattaneo argued in 2007 in an editorial in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health that research should center on effective methods to encourage and support women in breastfeeding. That was the goal of the resolution at the meeting of the World Health Assembly in Geneva in May.As for the belief that poor women who are themselves malnourished cannot adequately provide breast milk for their babies — that’s not true, says Cattaneo.”I’m very aware of the arguments from Trump,” says Perez-Escamilla of the president’s assertion that many poor women “need access to formula.””Many poor women are undernourished, and that spreads the notion that their milk is low quality and low quantity,” he says. “But their milk is still better than formula.”Cattaneo agrees. “When the formula industry says that mothers in low-income countries are too sick and malnourished to breastfeed, that is false. Breast milk is of excellent quality even if a mother is sick or malnourished. Quantity is also adequate, except in rare cases of terminal disease or very severe malnutrition.”There are few medical conditions and treatments that rule out breastfeeding, says Perez-Escamilla. Today, even women who are infected with HIV can follow the same recommendations for breastfeeding as uninfected women, provided they are on anti-retroviral therapy. “Women receiving some types of chemotherapy, or on some types of antidepressants or who are substance abusers should not breastfeed,” he says. “But overall, there are very, very few situations where she cannot breastfeed.”Nestle, along with Danone, Mead Johnson Nutrition and Abbott Laboratories, is one of the four leading corporations selling infant formula around the world.In 1977, Nestle’s formula practices made headlines when a boycott was announced in the U.S. in response to what breastfeeding advocates termed “aggressive marketing” of formula, especially in poor countries.Then and now, Nestle has defended its practices.In a statement emailed to NPR this week, Nestle said: “Nestlé strongly supports breastfeeding and has not wavered on this position. We have not, nor would we ever, lobby any governments — including the US government — to oppose breastfeeding policies anywhere in the world.”A study on industry practices by Save the Children finds that the top six formula manufacturers sometimes use marketing practices at odds with the code of marketing practices for infant formula drawn up by the World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of WHO. The International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes includes a call for no promotion of breast milk substitutes to the public, no gifts to mothers or health workers, no free samples to pregnant women or mothers and no sponsorship of meetings of health professionals. The report found cases of companies paying doctors to recommend their milk formulas and offering coupons, contests, gifts and other incentives to mothers to buy formula. The results are in line with earlier findings of ARCH, Assessment and Research on Child Health, an organization that investigates how foods for children are promoted. ARCH’s 2016 study of Tanzania, Cambodia, Nepal and Senegal found similar promotional activities by formula companies.”At the end of the day, it is the woman’s decision to decide how she wants to feed her baby,” says Perez-Escamilla. “It should be a truly informed choice on a level playing field. But that is impossible in low-income countries in an environment that is pushing them to formula feed.”Susan Brink is a freelance writer who covers health and medicine. She is the author of The Fourth Trimester, and co-author of A Change of Heart. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

first_img___SCREEN TIMEFully open, there’s plenty of real estate on the Galaxy Fold’s main screen, which measures 7.3 inches (18.5 centimeters) diagonally. It’s great if you want to take and review photos, watch videos or read e-books without squinting. Multi-tasking is also possible with up to three apps open at the same time. Wide open, the Fold felt more like a small tablet than a smartphone, which suggests that one possible market is people who want both kinds of devices but don’t want to buy two.As with anything that folds, there’s a crease. It runs down the center of the screen and is visible at certain angles, though I didn’t really notice it when using the apps. Samsung developed a new adhesive to glue the composite polymer screen together, and promises it can withstand being opened and closed 200,000 times, or 100 times a day for five years. Citation: New Samsung handset: Innovation hinges on folding screen (2019, April 16) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-samsung-handset-hinges-screen.html © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. When Samsung said this year it would launch a smartphone with a folding screen, the big question was whether the innovation was something people actually wanted or needed. ___OPEN AND SHUTClosed, the Galaxy Fold is about 6.3 centimeters wide and 16 centimeters long (2.5 by 6.3 inches). It felt like holding a TV remote control, but heavier. The phone’s two panels are held shut by magnets, so a bit of force is needed to get it open. With a little practice I was able to do it one-handed by jamming my thumb between the two sections to pop them apart.Samsung spent nearly five years working on the hinge, which went through more than 1,000 prototypes. It uses cogs and gears to give it a smooth feel and has two open positions. First, it unfolds to 140 degrees—handy if you want to put it down on your desk but still need to angle part of the screen for a video call, for example. Bend it further and the screen silently and solidly opens to a flat position. To close the phone, you click it out of the open position and snap the sides shut. The Samsung Galaxy Fold smartphone is seen in its folded position, during a media preview event in London, Tuesday April 16, 2019. Samsung is hoping the innovation of smartphones with folding screens reinvigorates the market. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan) Is the Galaxy Fold a gimmick to help sell more smartphones in a slowing market or a true breakthrough that will change how we use our devices?Major manufacturers have in recent years been largely updating smartphones with marginal improvements like better cameras and face scanning technology, so skepticism has been high.The South Korean electronics company this week offered the media a hands-on preview ahead of the release in the U.S. this month, and the first impression is that a folding screen in some circumstances might be a useful innovation—but at a cost of almost $2,000 it won’t be a mass market product anytime soon.___WHY A FOLDABLE SCREEN?As people increasingly use their phones to do data-hungry tasks like view photos on Instagram and watch movies or TV shows on YouTube or Netflix, Samsung says the case for a folding phone has become clear: People want bigger screens but they also want a phone they can carry around in their pocket.Skeptics might say that folding phones are a sign that the smartphone industry has run out of good ideas and fallen into an innovation malaise. Samsung isn’t alone. Little known Royole started selling its FlexPai in China last year while Chinese tech giant Huawei announced its own folding phone, the Mate X, days after Samsung’s announcement. Explore further The Latest: Samsung’s foldable phone will cost nearly $2000 The Samsung Galaxy Fold smartphone is seen during a media preview event in London, Tuesday April 16, 2019. Samsung is hoping the innovation of smartphones with folding screens reinvigorates the market. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan) The Fold has a second screen, a long, narrow display, on one of its outer panels, so you can continue using apps while it’s closed. I tried out a few—YouTube and car racing game “Asphalt”—that transitioned seamlessly between both screens. It could, for example, be useful to consult Google Maps in detail on the big screen before setting off, then put it in your pocket and quickly check the directions en route. But I’m still not convinced that “app continuity” is something I need.The phone’s specs have been available to app makers for a while and the company says most should only need a few tweaks to run properly on its Android operating system. Hundreds of apps have already been “optimized” for the Fold but Samsung won’t say how many until it’s released.___CAMERAS AND MOREThe Galaxy Fold has no less than six cameras. Three lenses on the rear, another on the cover next to the second screen, and two more inside, including a selfie camera. There’s a fingerprint scanner on the right side, which can be used when it’s both open and closed. Inside, the battery is split in two, one in each panel, and it has enough juice to wirelessly charge another device, such as the wireless earphones included. It’s not clear if the bigger screen needs more power—Samsung hasn’t given any battery life estimates, saying only that it may vary.___WHENThe Galaxy Fold is set for release in the U.S. on April 26, priced at $1,980. It goes on sale in some Europe markets on May 3. A model holds a Samsung Galaxy Fold smartphone to her face, during a media preview event in London, Tuesday April 16, 2019. Samsung is hoping the innovation of smartphones with folding screens giving a large interactive space or smaller usual screen, reinvigorates the market. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)last_img read more

first_img Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndohear.comThese German hearing aids are going viralhear.comUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoCNETMeet the US Navy’s new $13 billion aircraftCNETUndo Can a chameleon build a galaxy? According to new computer models, yes. This isn’t a surrealist joke but rather the implication of recent simulations that aim to explain the inner workings of dark energy, a mysterious force that is driving apart everything in the universe. The findings, published July 8 in the journal Nature Astronomy, lend support to a model of dark energy known as Chameleon Theory. Hints of dark energy were first discovered in the late 1990s, when cosmologists measured the light from distant supernovas and realized that the stars were dimmer than expected, suggesting that the fabric of spacetime was not only expanding, but accelerating in its expansion. Physicists proposed the existence of a force that worked in opposition to gravity, pushing things away from one another, rather than pulling them together. [The Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65919-chameleon-theory-explains-dark-energy-maybe.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Most researchers subscribe to the idea that dark energy is what’s known as the cosmological constant, a type of energy pent up in the vacuum of space itself, Baojiu Li, a mathematical physicist at Durham University in the United Kingdom, told Live Science. “This simple model works very well practically, and it is a straightforward addition to the cosmological model without having to modify the law of gravity,” he said. The problem is that leading physics theories predict that the value of the vacuum’s energy should be 120 orders of magnitude higher than what cosmologists observe from actual measurements of dark energy in the universe, said Li. So physicists have sought out alternate explanations, including Chameleon Theory. The theory proposes a new force, atop the four already known, mediated by a particle called the chameleon particle, according to an explainer in Sky and Telescope magazine. The chameleon force would act like dark energy, driving apart galaxies in the cosmos. But having an unexpected fifth force comes with its own dilemma — how come our instruments have never before seen such a particle? The theory suggests that chameleon particles, like their reptilian namesakes, can blend into their surroundings to evade detection. Rather than changing color, these particles change mass. In high-density environments, such as that near Earth, they have a high mass and are therefore difficult to detect. This is why we don’t see the effects of chameleon particles on our solar system, but rather only on extremely large cosmological scales, where, overall, matter is sparse, according to the theory. In order to test Chameleon Theory, researchers have run powerful computer simulations, spinning virtual dark matter — an as-yet-unknown substance vastly outweighing visible matter in the universe — with the four known forces plus chameleon particles to create celestial structures like our solar system, according to a statement. But until now, processing-power limitations have meant that the models could not include ordinary, visible matter, like protons and electrons. Li and his colleagues used supercomputers to finally include the ordinary particles alongside everything else and produce galaxy-scale structures. “The simulations show that realistic galaxies, like our own Milky Way, can form despite the complicated behavior of gravity in [Chameleon Theory],” Li said. The team hopes further modeling will reveal ways to distinguished the theory from other hypotheses about dark energy, he added. So do these ideas challenge Einstein’s theory of general relativity, as has been widely reported? “Challenge is a strong word,” Jeremy Sakstein, a physicist at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia who was not involved in the work, told Live Science. To test general relativity, it’s useful to have competing theories, he added, and this new research represents a step toward making predictions about what these alternatives might see on cosmological scales. The 11 Biggest Unanswered Questions About Dark Matter 11 Fascinating Facts About Our Milky Way Galaxy 8 Ways You Can See Einstein’s Theory of Relativity in Real Lifelast_img read more

first_img SMEs (small and medium enterprises) will be allocated about 100 acres of land in the Model Plastics Park being developed by the Telangana government at Mankhal-Thummalur on the outskirts of Hyderabad, said Jayesh Ranjan, Principal Secretary, Industries & Commerce & IT.The exclusive park was launched in 2017. The state has been proactive in meeting the demands put forth by the Telangana and Andhra Pradesh Plastics Manufacturing Industry (TAAPMA). It provides employment to about three lakh people, he said at a curtain raiser meet on IPLEX 2018, a four-day international expo to be held in August.About three lakh people are employed in the plastics industry, which is one of the growing sectors in the state. There has been a 50 per cent increase in consumption of raw material, It is also an industry with a low entry barrier, thus, offering opportunities to different sections of the poor as well, he added.Ban no answerGiven the many benefits and business potential of plastics in packaging and other applications, a ban on it is not the solution, felt Gowra Srinivas, President, Federation of Telangana & Andhra Pradesh Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FTAPCCI).The need is to create an effective after-use plastics economy. From 15 million tonnes in 1964, global production has surged to 311 million tonnes in 2014. It is projected to double to over 600 million tonnes in the next 20 years, he said.Plastics don’t mean carry-bags, though there are over 100 products made out of the the polymer. There are about 20,000 plastic units in and around Hyderabad. Most of them are unorganised, with only 2000 in the organised sector, said Anil Reddy Vennam, a leading player from the industry.He argued in favour of the judicious use of plastics and responsibility in disposing, recyling, etc, instead of a ban, which was not warranted. They should be conserved and recycled with appropriate measures announced by the government and industry associations.Venu Gopal Jasti, Convenior, IPLEX 2018 and President of TAAPMA said the event is rotationally held once a year in major centres of South India — Hyderabad, Chennai, Bengaluru and Kochi. It provides a common platform for participants in the plastics industry- manufactures, dealers, buyers and end-users. SHARE Telangana COMMENT July 12, 2018 SHARE SHARE EMAIL plastics and synthetics Published on COMMENTSlast_img read more