first_imgKINGSTON:Road race veterans Rupert Green and Arieta Martin secured the respective male and female 5K titles at the Running Events 5K at Emancipation Park, New Kingston, on Sunday.Green, who represented Double Marchers club, won in 16:07, beating arch-rival Shawn Pitter of Body By Kurt (16:25). Ronique Williams, unattached, was third in 17:00.”I had to work very hard for this victory,” said Green. “Pitter had a huge lead on me, and I had to chase him all the way to the 3k, but once I got in front, I maintained my pace and the lead to the finish.”Martin, who also represented Double Marchers, stopped the clock at 20:50, followed by Karlene Blagrove, who clocked 21:59. Ina Daley was third in 22:16.She was doing the course for the first time.”I am pleased with my effort today. I am just coming off an injury, and I executed my race plan properly. The course was a tough one with a lot of inclines, but I enjoyed testing myself out there today,” exclaimed Martin.The 5K walk for the men went to Lenworth Hunter, while Paula Sinclair took the female equivalent.Worthy causeProceeds from the event will go towards the Wortley Home for Girls and, according to board chairman Raphael Sangster, the initiative is a welcome one at this time.”On June 29, we had a fire, which destroyed our dorms at the girls’ home, and it was the idea of Mr Alfred Francis to stage a 5K to raise funds to assist in the rebuilding of the dorms.”So I must say thanks to the Running Events team for their kind gesture, and we hope the success of the event will go a far way in helping us to get back on track at the Wortley Home for Girls,” said Sangster.Race director Francis believes the event was well received by the over 900 participants who came out to support the cause.”Even though August is a tough month to stage road races, we decided we had to put this event on to assist the charity, and we are pleased at the turn out and proud of the initiative.”Keisha Bowla-Hines of Trinidad & Tobago was pleased with her first road race on Jamaican soil.”My family came to Jamaica on holidays, and I went on the Running Events Limited website and saw that they had a race, so I decided to compete, and I must say that it is a fantastic event for a worthy cause,” said Bowla-Hines.last_img read more

first_imgUSC senior Lodrick Stewart led the student section at Galen Center in displaying the university’s trademark victory sign as the school’s fight song played. Teammates surrounded Stewart, some going into the aisles, as the capacity crowd paid tribute to one of the Trojans’ best seasons since the Pacific-10 Conference expanded to 10teams in 1979. The players paid tribute back for the electric atmosphere that built all season and reached a crescendo Saturday. Then the players lifted senior walk-on Chris Penrose – who hit a 3-pointer in the final seconds – onto their shoulders and carried him off the court. USC’s 84-66 victory over California in its final home game displayed everything that has changed this year within the program – the attitude, the attendance and the atmosphere. “We said from day one, we’re not going to beg our people to come out,” said coach Tim Floyd after his team played in front of a sellout Galen Center-record crowd of 10,027. “You have to earn those things.” USC has done that with a team that has defied all expectations. The Trojans (21-8, 11-5) are guaranteed at least fourth place in the Pac-10, will take second if they win both games in Washington this week and can wrap up third with a win or Stanford loss in the final two games. This for a team that entered the season picked to finish sixth in the conference and starting freshmen at point guard and power forward. “We’re playing for seeding now,” Stewart said. “There’s not a doubt we’re going to the (NCAA) Tournament. I think we’re going now, and the coaches feel the same way.” center_img USC’s 15-3 record at Galen Center is its best home mark since going 16-3 in 1961. Stewart drained four 3-pointers to give him 220 for his career, breaking the all-time USC mark of 218 held by Brandon Granville (1999-02). His record-breaking shot came at an opportune time, as Cal (14-14, 6-10) had drawn within five points with a little over 13 minutes remaining. “It’s great to get the record on a day like this,” said Stewart, who left the game to large ovation with 55.8 seconds remaining. “It was so sad knowing it’s my last time playing here.” Stewart finished with 13points, seven rebounds and two blocked shots. Taj Gibson led the Trojans with 18 points. But the shot that drew the biggest crowd outburst of the season came from Penrose, the little-used walk-on who had scored three points entering the game. He came in with 2:23remaining, after the crowd had been chanting his name. Each time he touched the ball, fans yelled for him to shoot. His 3-pointer with the shot clock winding down in the final minute didn’t draw iron. But he got one more chance at his “Rudy” moment and swished a shot from the right corner with 5.3 seconds to go. “I turned around and looked at the student section and couldn’t really hear anything because the place was so loud,” said Penrose, who brought his career total to 16 points. “My heart was going a mile a minute, and I was just so happy and excited. It’s kind of a storybook ending to a little walk-on’s career.” matthew.kredell@dailynews.com (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_imgTwo Indians are among 24 people awarded this year’s prestigious MacArthur Fellowships, popularly known as “genius” grants. Maneesh Agarwala, a University of California, Berkeley, Computer Vision Technologist, was selected for work that “focuses on developing new tools and algorithms to visualize and efficiently make sense of tremendous volumes of information. To do this, he draws on an understanding of human cognition, and specifically how the brain processes images and visual displays.”L. Mahadevan, applied mathematician at Harvard University, focuses on modeling complex biological and engineering phenomena and “applies complex mathematical analyses to a variety of seemingly simple, but vexing, questions across the physical and biological sciences — how cloth folds when draped, how skin wrinkles, how flags flutter, how Venus flytraps snap closed.”Each MacArthur fellow receives $500,000 in “no strings attached” support over five years.  Related Itemslast_img read more