first_imgNot very often in recent times have we had credible cause to heap praises on the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB). The success of the Under-19 team presents us with one such precious moment. Conversely, the splintered criticisms of the board, pointing to the inadequacy of preparation of the triumphant team, seems spurious, irrational and lacking credibility. Since the objective of preparing any sporting team for competition is for that team to be victorious, in the advent that the team is victorious, there can be no guarantees that having prepared the team differently the team would still have been victorious. It is by that general principle that these particular criticisms of the WICB should be rubbished. If the WICB and the coaching staff had it to do all over again with the same set of players, it would be foolhardy for them to do anything significantly different. The WICB president, Mr Dave Cameron, speaking on the arrival of the three Jamaican players in the squad, quite rightly took credit for the part the board played in the selection and preparation of the team. Mr Cameron pointed to the fact that at least five members of the team are already playing professionally and that the core of the team was selected as far back as 2014 and actually competed in the regional 50-over competition in the very same year. REGULAR TRAINING CAMPS Subsequent to that, there were regular training camps leading into the tournament, with the preparation culminating in a three-match warm-up series against the host nation of the tournament, Bangladesh. The genesis of these criticisms, I suspect, emanated from the relatively sparse number of warm-up games the team played leading into the World Cup compared top teams such as India, who played consistently together for two years and were unbeaten coming into the tournament. Bangladesh, we were told, played closer to a dozen warm-up games and were red hot early in the tournament, as were the Indians. The West Indies emphatically destroyed the myth of perfection that relates to the preparation of both India and Bangladesh by beating both when it mattered most. It is, therefore, quite plausible that the West Indies’ preparations were better than that of both Bangladesh and India. The West Indies team was the sharpest team mentally in the tournament, as evidenced by those two huge tournament changing moments, starting with that crucial run out against Zimbabwe, followed by the big stumping of the Indian star batsman in the final. SHARP, TALENTED Not only were they sharp mentally, they are talented, they were motivated and they appeared to get fitter and sharper as the tournament progressed, while the more fancied teams, with their so-called superior preparation, faded and fizzed at the business end of the tournament. The silly assumption being made is that because India and Bangladesh played 20 or 30 warm-up games between them they were better prepared. That is obviously not necessarily so. There is always the risk of overworking and burning out the players, plus there are cultural differences that must be considered. West Indians are naturally stronger and more natural athletes and perhaps need less physical drilling and more psychological work. The success of this West Indies team might very well serve to redefine the way teams at this level are prepared for competition, with less physical and game sessions and more mental and psychological preparedness. The victorious players, coaching staff, as well as the WICB leadership should all be congratulated for executing plans and preparations that in the end were proven to be perfect by the fact that the West Indies Under-19 team lifted the ultimate prize.last_img read more

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-up In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide DAY6 is for everybody “It’s a reason why I committed those miscues, because I’m so excited to play. But when I returned in the third quarter, I followed coach’s words and calmed myself and eventually, I got my confidence back and the shots got falling,” he said.Napa, though, is willing to treat Ambohot with kid gloves as he expects to have him in his peak form soon.“We’re not rushing him. We know that he’s a warrior. Even if he’s injured, he will play. Coming to the next game, maybe he’ll be 100-percent,” he said.For his part, Ambohot has faith in himself that he’ll be better for Letran’s all-important duel against San Beda next Friday.“I’ll do everything I can, I’ll do my best on what I have to do to be 100-percent. Coach told me that I should get my game back and I need to have my confidence again so that’s what I will do this coming week,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Ginebra nears finals, nips TNT in game 3 Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READcenter_img How to help the Taal evacuees Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson “I’m so excited to play again,” said Ambohot, who gathered eight points, on a 2-of-3 shooting from three, three rebounds, three blocks, and a steal in his 18 minutes on the floor in his return. However, Letran failed to dent Lyceum’s armor and lost, 81-69, to drop to an even 8-8 card.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogCoach Jeff Napa said that it was evident that Ambohot still lacks the timing after a seven-week layoff “because he tires quickly.”That lack of rhythm showed when Ambohot committed three turnovers in the second quarter, something the sophomore big man attributed to his eagerness to get a piece of the action anew. Jeo Ambohot. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netJeo Ambohot is just glad to be back on the hardcourt for Letran.Playing for the first time since fracturing his right wrist on August 15 in Letran’s game against San Sebastian, the 6-foot-6 center’s entry was a welcome boost for the Knights as they continue their Final Four hunt. ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more