first_img(Mi’kmaq chiefs gather for Nova Scotia Treaty Day. Photo: Trina Roache/APTN) Trina RoacheAPTN National NewsA legal brief submitted on behalf of the province of Nova Scotia denies treaty rights and labels the Mi’kmaq as conquered peoples.“To suggest that we are ‘conquered’ is a racist taunt,” wrote Millbrook Chief Bob Gloade in a media release. “At its worst, it has been used against Indigenous Canadians to perpetuate or justify a state of inferior legal, social or socio-economic conditions.”The brief is part of a court case centred on consultation with the Sipekne’Katik Band over a natural gas storage project. The band asked for a judicial review of the provincial permits that approved the Alton Gas project.But a court case about whether the Crown meaningfully consulted with one band over a particular project, has brought up what many are calling offensive arguments about treaty rights that extend to all Mi’kmaq in Nova Scotia.Alex Cameron, legal counsel for the province’s Department of Justice spent several pages of the submission arguing that the Treaty of 1752 is void, as it was “terminated by subsequent hostilities.” Cameron goes on to point out that the Supreme Court of Canada “wrongly decided” the Marshall Decision, which upheld the Mi’kmaq Treaty right to hunt, fish and gather.“Is this the best the Crown can offer? His position is a betrayal of the province’s commitment to reconciliation,” said Gloade.Cheryl Maloney, a former band councillor for Sipekne’Katik, led the fight against Alton Gas and sat in court, listening to Cameron’s arguments.“I think it’s dishonourable not only to Aboriginal people,” said Maloney, “but it’s a real dishonour to Nova Scotians when we’re in an era of trying to reconcile our past.”Every October 1, for 30 years, the Mi’kmaq have gathered with provincial leaders in Halifax to celebrate and honour the Treaty of 1752.Walking out of the courtroom on the Alton Gas case, however, Maloney was left wondering if the province even thinks the treaty exists.“We now know what kind of province, what kind of government we’re dealing with,” she said. “They showed their true colours.”In 2009 Cameron wrote a book, Power without Law, which was highly critical of the Marshall decision. At the time, the Nova Scotia chiefs asked the province to prohibit Cameron from working on cases tied to Mi’kmaq issues. That didn’t happen.Mi’kmaq lawyer Naiomi Metallic said Cameron is “clearly biased. He has a very particular agenda and this is the question I wonder; is it more him that’s driving this bus?”She pointed out that there had to be oversight on a document filed in a court of law on behalf of the attorney general of Nova Scotia. And that has her asking what it says about the province and what that might mean for relations with the Mi’kmaq.“Why is he making an argument about Mi’kmaq being conquered?” she asks. “No one is going to accept that and it just really shatters the relationship or has the potential to.”The Nova Scotia Chiefs have been at the negotiating table since 2002, working out how to implement the treaties in a modern context.Eric Zscheile is a lawyer for the Assembly of Nova Scotia Chief’s negotiating body, Mi’kmaq Rights Initiative, or as it’s called in Mi’kmaq, Kwilmu’kw Maw-klusuaqn. He was also the legal counsel for the Mi’kmaq when Donald Marshall was charged with catching and selling eels; the case that was victorious at the Supreme Court in 1999.Hearing Cameron’s arguments around treaty rights in 2016, Zscheile shakes his head.“How do you react to that? And do you get pulled down the rabbit hole of getting involved in that dynamic again? I argued with all of those things decades ago,” said Zscheile. “As far I’m concerned the Supreme Court has already answered it.”He said the legal argument seems at odds with the political point of view he sees at the negotiation and tripartite tables.“Unlike what Alex Cameron says, we have two governments that are willing to sit down and say yes, we need to recognize those treaties, we need to recognize them as valid. We need to recognize them as legal and constitutional,” said Zscheile.And the premier of Nova Scotia agrees.On Thursday, Stephen McNeil sat down for an interview with APTN wanting to clarify the government position.“Mi’kmaq have traditional rights in this province, determined by treaties and we have an obligation and a duty to consult,” said McNeil.The premier, who is also minister for Aboriginal Affairs, said he had not read the brief before it was presented in court, and then it was too late to take it back.McNeil called the arguments questioning the validity of treaty rights “unacceptable” and said he understands the angry reaction from Mi’kmaq.“I’m not happy, not just as the minister, but as the premier that that position was put forward in the court,” said McNeil.“Disappointed would be a huge understatement. To say that I was furious would probably be more accurate.”The premier is putting distance between Cameron’s take on the treaties and his own.But he acknowledges, “I’m going to wear this. We as a government are wearing this. No matter who put it forward, somebody in government should’ve been signing off on this.”McNeil is already looking into how that happened. In the meantime, he’s doing damage control.“My hope is that the chiefs and the Mi’kmaq community will understand it is not a reflection of who I am, and who our government is,” said McNeil.The premier said he has not read Cameron’s book. He can’t say whether Alex Cameron will be removed from cases involving the Mi’kmaq.“I take this issue very seriously and we will be looking into it to see what is the proper course of correction,” he said.troache@aptn.calast_img read more

first_imgCALGARY – WestJet Airlines Ltd. says Swoop, its new ultra-low-cost carrier, will launch on June 20.The airline will begin with six weekly flights between Abbotsford, B.C., and Hamilton, and six weekly flights between Hamilton and Halifax.Swoop will add six weekly flights between Hamilton and Edmonton and between Hamilton and Winnipeg on June 25.Service between Abbotsford and Edmonton will begin July 25 with three flights a day. The airline will have a total of 45 weekly flights.WestJet announced plans for the no-frills discount airline last year.last_img

first_img“We looked at a projection of over 50 years and, now, this isn’t realistic in a sense that you’re not going have these big swings in cost. It’s really hard to predict 50 years from now. This is based off those expected lifespans.”From those projections, the District will be looking at spending 1.3 million dollars annually over the next 50 years, and for water, the District is looking at paying $800,000 annually over the next half a century.Council feels the Asset Management report was well done.Adam says this Asset Management work puts Taylor in a better position when it comes to applying for financial support.“This whole Asset Management work that you are doing puts you in a better position to be able to access funding for grants because this is all now considered to be a prerequisite for when are applying for certain stuff.”You can view the full Asset Management Presentation on the District of Taylor’s website. “It actually is part of the daily operations and decision making, and it’s something that happens every day. It’s a living document or piece of information that’s constantly changing to have more information available.”According to Zackodnik, the District currently has 114 million dollars in assets.“We came up with 114 million dollars worth of assets that you guys currently own. About 42 percent in roads, and 46 in water.”Zackodnik says they have looked at a projection of over 50 years for the life span of the current assets. Project timeline for the asset management project. Source District of TaylorKimberly Zackodnik and Jamie Adam of Urban Systems made the presentation to Council.The presentation looked at the District’s current status in Asset Management and what steps will need to be taken in the future.Adam says Asset Management is the combination of building or constructing, along with maintenance and operations of assets.“It’s important to remember that asset management is actually the combination of building or constructing, but also, on the maintenance side, it’s also around maintenance and operations as well as rehabilitation or abandoning or disposal of some of the assets you already have. It’s not just “let’s just building something or just replace it,” it kind of looks at the whole picture.”Adam also adds that asset management is part of the daily operations of the District.center_img TAYLOR, B.C. – The District of Taylor Council was given a presentation on phase one of the District’s Asset Management at a recent Council meeting on January 21.Urban Systems is the engineering consultants that helped to develop the District’s Asset Management Plan.Discussions for creating the asset management plan had started pre-2014, with inventory taking place since then.last_img read more

first_imgby Selim SAHEB ETTABAGAZA CITY, Palestinian Territories– It was the publicity stunt of the year in Hamas-ruled Gaza: the delivery of Kentucky Fried Chicken from a branch in Egypt through a tunnel under their shared border.But since the service was launched in spring, the Hamas-friendly Egyptian government of Mohamed Mursi has been toppled in an army coup. And since then, Egypt’s military has destroyed hundreds of the tunnels, sending the takeaway orders into free-fall with the rest of Gaza’s economy, already squeezed by trade restrictions imposed by its other neighbor, Israel.In Rafah, the sprawling city which straddles the Gaza-Egypt border, the dust raised by hectic smuggling activity has settled in the wake of the Egyptian army’s campaign against the tunnels.Just a few scattered diggers are working under tarpaulins covering the entrances to abandoned tunnels, excavating “for the future”.“Is there a future for tunnels? Not with Sisi,” sighs a Gazan border police officer, referring to Egyptian military chief General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.The flow of state-subsidized Egyptian fuel to Gaza has all but dried up since the July coup, dwindling from about a million liters a day in June to 10,000-20,000 liters a week now, according to the latest report of the U.N. Office of Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.The shortage caused the shutdown on November 1 of the Palestinian territory’s only power plant, which provided about a third of the strip’s electricity.The closure has resulted in power cuts for 16 hours a day.Without electricity, water treatment stations have stopped working, and last week sewage began spilling onto the streets of several neighborhoods in Gaza City.Now the Al-Yamama delivery company is looking back nostalgically on its days of delivering Egyptian KFC.“Despite the high prices because of transport costs, people paid to have something that does not exist here,” said Haitham al-Shami, a 29-year-old partner in the business.“It was a challenge,” he said, “to show that Gaza is not only war and death. We love life, but we have nothing.”‘Ketchup and mayonnaise’His subterranean fast food service, largely conceived to promote Al-Yamama’s business, lasted only a month before being banned by Hamas “for public health reasons” even before the tunnel crackdown, Shami said.According to Palestinian economist Omar Shaaban, Gazans had developed a taste for small luxuries, which Israeli and Egyptian restrictions have taken away again.“Gaza is a modern society. People in Gaza know Nescafe and cappuccino and these products,” he said.“Now we have become a relief society — we depend on international humanitarian assistance for food.”Israel first imposed its land, sea and air blockade on the coastal strip in 2006 after militants there seized an Israeli soldier, who was eventually freed in a lop-sided prisoner swap in 2011.It was further tightened in mid-2007 when the Islamic militant group Hamas took control of Gaza.Israel eased the blockade slightly following an international outcry after its botched commando raid on a Turkish Gaza-bound flotilla in 2010, allowing food and some building materials to be trucked in.“The siege destroyed the industrial productive sector, the siege prevented any export from Gaza, only five or six items were allowed,” said Shaban, director of local think-tank Palthink.“We’re not suffering because of a lack of rain or because we don’t have food. It’s a man-made catastrophe, because somebody decided to make our life difficult,” he added.“We are a hostage by four kidnappers,” he said, naming Israel, Hamas, the Western-backed Palestinian Authority which rules the West Bank, and the international community.Palestinian negotiator Mohammed Shtayyeh wrote last month in left-leaning Israeli daily Haaretz that token Israeli economic measures would not change the Palestinians’ lives.“In recent years, some international parties have tried to convince the world that solutions begin by removing a roadblock or allowing ketchup and mayonnaise into Gaza,” he said.“What Palestine needs is ending the Israeli occupation, which is the only way for Palestine to reach its full economic potential.”last_img read more

Then-sophomore pitcher Ryan Riga throws a pitch during a game against Oregon May 11 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU lost, 3-1.Courtesy of OSU Athletics Then-sophomore pitcher Greg Greve (32) fires a pitch during a game against Minnesota April 8, 2012, at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 4-1.Courtesy of OSU AthleticsDespite an influx of youth on the Ohio State baseball team, leadership is a likely necessity if the Buckeyes have dreams to be considered among the nation’s best. Although the team is less than three weeks into its regular season, the leaders on the pitching staff have already begun to emerge.Senior captain Greg Greve, and junior Ryan Riga have established themselves as the starting 1-2 punch for the Buckeyes on the mound. They make up a small portion of the pitching staff with collegiate experience, though.“It puts expectations on our roles. We have to show the young guys the ropes,” Greve said.A corps of talented freshmen and sophomores outweigh the upperclassmen in numbers, but coach Greg Beals said he is confident going into weekend trips knowing he is sending Greve and Riga out to start games.“I consider them bookends,” Beals said. “You got Greve going out first (on the weekend), Riga going out second … so our young guys are bookended a little bit.”Beals said he does not have a problem with sending any of the freshmen out to throw big innings, but Greve’s and Riga’s performances thus far have yet to warrant that.Neither were regular starters last year, but both have starting experience. Greve, a right-hander, started 20 games combined during his freshman and sophomore campaigns before moving to the bullpen last year, where he lowered his ERA to a career-best 3.65. Riga, a left-hander, began his collegiate career at Wabash Valley College, where he went 9-3 as a freshman and posted a 2.77 ERA. He improved as a sophomore during his first season with the Buckeyes in 2013, getting his ERA down to 2.14 in 29 relief appearances.With none of the starting rotation returning this season, both pitchers knew it would be their time to step up.“Last year the (pitching) staff set the tone for the team,” Riga said. “We’re trying to do the same to accomplish our goals and make it to the national tournament.”Greve started on opening day for the Buckeyes against reigning Big East Tournament Champion Connecticut. In the weeks leading up to that first game, he had no idea he would be the day one starter for the team, but embraced the role.Things looked shaky to start, with the Huskies earning two runs off him to begin the first inning.“Opening day showed that I was excited and nervous,” Greve said. “After the first inning, I went into the dugout and took some deep breaths and talked to my teammates to just help me relax.”Getting calmed down by his teammates appeared to pay dividends, as he subsequently pitched five strong innings, allowing only two baserunners and retiring 11 batters in a row at one point. The Buckeye offense tallied eight runs to earn him the win.Riga started against Auburn in the second game of the season and pitched for six innings, giving up only four hits while not allowing any runs. His effort against the Tigers earned him the honor of being named a Big Ten Co-Pitcher of the week. He said the award wasn’t important, though.“It doesn’t mean much to me,” Riga said. “I’m just trying to leave games with a lead and help the team win as many games as I can.”The second weekend of play didn’t see Greve and Riga, but Greve said he was glad the team could generate enough offense to win even if the starters struggled.“It’s a great feeling knowing our offense can come back and get runs even if we have a bad day,” Greve said. “Our job is to go out and keep it close for them.”As the freshmen and sophomore relievers continue to develop, Beals said he knows Greve and Riga can provide them with someone to look up to and follow.“They have the right leadership to prepare the (young) guys to be successful,” Beals said.The Buckeyes (5-2) have set the tone early, just as they had hoped to do, Riga said.“We had a big emphasis on the beginning of the year,” Riga said. “We focused on getting a good start and are happy with how it’s been.”Riga and Greve know there is much more to be done, though, and that the team has to keep winning to achieve their main goal.“We want to represent Ohio State in the national tournament,” Greve said. “We have worked our butts off for this all winter. All I want to do is help the team win.”The Buckeyes are scheduled to play Pittsburgh Friday in the Keith LeClair Classic in Greenville, N.C. First pitch is set for 1:05 p.m. read more

first_imgReal Madrid forward Marco Asensio, revealed the main reasons for his recent dip in form for his club and gave Solari the thumbs up as the new manager.The new season for young forward Marco Asensio didn’t start as he expected, a player who hasn’t been able to cover the full expectations that were formed around him during his first couple of seasons with Real Madrid.Today with Santiago Solari as the new manager, he is still one of the players who is not considered within the group of footballers who play on a regular basis and has become one of the biggest disappointments for this season.When the new season was about to start, manager Julen Lopetegui decided that he didn’t want to bring any new transfers precisely because he didn’t want to slow the youngster’s progression as a player.Asensio hasn’t been able to respond to this level of trust from Lopetegui, to the point where Solari is not even considering him as an essential part of the squad like he was when Zidane was still around.During the first few months, the player had already stated that he knew more ambition was required from him and he vowed to fight for a secured spot in the squad’s starting eleven.Y @marcoasensio10… ¡Generosidad sin límite! #UnaNuevaIlusión pic.twitter.com/eYpTXJh1K6— Selección Española de Fútbol (@SeFutbol) November 12, 2018Asensio was recently quoted by Diario AS during a television interview to a show called ‘Vamos’, where he gave some details about his lack of participation with the squad this season.“When things are going well, people pin you as the best player in the squad. When things are not going well, they pin you as the worst. In the end, there are some critics who are not fair, but we already know how journalism works in this country,” started Asensio.“I’m obviously generalizing, but I do find some criticisms to be hurtful towards me. Since I don’t really deem it important and I worry about my own performance, it doesn’t really affect me.”“Since Solari arrived things have improved, the results have been on our side. This is football. Solari is our manager now, we would die for any manager who is with us. We all need to be strong as we’ve always been, this will take us back to the winning path.”David Villa, FC BarcelonaTop 10 players who played for both Barcelona and Valencia Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to talk about the best players who represented both Barcelona and Valencia, prior to their La Liga encounter at Camp Nou this evening.“I certainly don’t see this episode as a moment of crisis. But I will also tell you that I’m not the one who has to pull the team up inside the club, there are other players who have played in this squad for longer and are more experienced.”“These players have a greater status than mine and they are the ones who need to carry the team. I did play for a few matches with the last manager, but now I don’t play as much as I’d like to but the final assessments will be made by the end of the season,” he concluded.+3. Seguimos trabajando y creciendo juntos. / + 3. We keep on working and growing together. 💪🏽 #RMLiga pic.twitter.com/Yw8F6at2KQ— Marco Asensio (@marcoasensio10) November 3, 2018Asensio is not the only one who has lost the complete confidence from the new manager, both he and Isco Alarcon are the two players who haven’t played a single minute under the Argentine and still have to prove they are worth for him.In Isco’s case, he played pretty much all the matches he could under Julen Lopetegui when he was fit, but he hasn’t played a single minute under Santiago Solari and this is starting to get worrisome for him.As far as Asensio is concerned, this player is going through the same over hyping that many young stars go through and this time is exactly the one in which he needs to be more careful.The press is the one to blame for this situation, because they are the ones who started making early comparisons that went to the kid’s head and reality has slapped him right in the face.Good training 👍🏽⚽ pic.twitter.com/XQlGrcMXDJ— Marco Asensio (@marcoasensio10) November 9, 2018What do you think Marco Asensio should do, stay and fight for a spot in Real Madrid or leave? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS, NOVEMBER 18, 2013- The government seems to be making a tremendous effort in fighting money-laundering in the Turks and Caicos Islands. In addition, to a recently held anti-money laundering training at Beaches Resort and Spa, the government is now hoping to pump funds into the area in an effort to minimize money-laundering activities in the TCI. At last Cabinet sitting, the country’s leaders advised the governor to approve monies amounting to more than $120,000 to improve the ability of the relevant authorities to detect money laundering, among beneficiaries of the fund are the Marine branch of the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police Force and the Financial Crimes Intelligence Unit. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

first_imgCameroon manager Clarence Seedorf revealed that he thinks Neymar made a terrible mistake by leaving FC Barcelona last year.Spain is currently going berserk with Neymar again, the Brazilian is about to face Clarence Seedorf’s Cameroon National Team and everybody keeps talking about his future outside of PSG.Before the World Cup, Neymar was projected to leave the French giants and sign a new contract with Real Madrid but things are not as clear now.The below average performance from that tournament and his ‘normal’ level of performance for PSG this season has brought a very different situation for Neymar’s future, there is even a rumor that links him to a possible return to FC Barcelona.With the Brazil vs Cameroon match about to take place this Tuesday, manager Clarence Seedorf wanted to give his two cents on the whole matter and revealed that Neymar should’ve never left the Catalan club in the first place because he had absolutely everything there.The constant rumors of him possibly coming back to the Catalan club, are coming after several reports of him visiting Barcelona and even allegedly offering himself back to the club.Seedorf and Kluivert v Neymar… in Milton Keynes?!As international friendlies go, this one’s pretty bizarre 👉 https://t.co/TlPhLOBrnJ pic.twitter.com/0cAk8LHNOD— BBC Sport (@BBCSport) November 19, 2018But a large portion of the Barcelona fans are still hurt after the way in which Neymar left, they don’t think that the best decision for them is to actually embrace the player back to the club.However, the player’s quality is not even in question as many of the club’s board members are considering the possibility to bring him back to the club if the transfer market allows them to actually get an acceptable deal for him.Everything will depend on whether he gets to win an important trophy this season with PSG, not winning the Champions League would drop his market value dramatically and could give them a new chance for the French giants to actually consider on him leaving.Neymar is clearly not happy with the titles that he has gotten so far in Ligue 1, he thought he would become the best player in the world after he left Barcelona and he only went to France to become Kylian Mbappé’s number 2 so far.Things are not working out as he expected, and the rest of the world is already starting to notice how unhappy he is.Opinion: Neymar will earn respect back from the PSG fans Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 After completing his incredible return to Parc des Princes, we predict that Neymar will earn the respect back from PSG supporters.The situation between Neymar…Seedorf: “Neymar cometió un pecado” https://t.co/QK678tCxfc pic.twitter.com/kIV1QXYaSa— Futbolestodo.com (@Futbolestodo) November 19, 2018For Clarence Seedorf who played in the Spanish La Liga for many years with Real Madrid and will face Neymar on Tuesday, the Brazil skipper obviously made a terrible mistake by leaving the Catalan club and describes his situation perfectly.“Neymar’s talent is undisputed, but he needs a squad that can help him grow in order to give the best of himself because he won’t achieve that on his own,” said Seedorf via Sport ahead of the international friendly between Brazil and Cameroon.“I honestly believe that leaving Barcelona so quickly was a terrible sin on his behalf. If he had stayed in the club for two more seasons, things could’ve worked out differently for him. But now he is at PSG and that’s the path he needs to follow.”“Neymar also needs a manager who can give him what he needs, because he is still very young and he hasn’t been in Europe for a too long.”“He also needs to play alongside other footballers who are better than he is, I’m not talking about players who rival his quality as a footballer but people who have won bigger titles than he has.”“These players can teach him about different experiences and they can also teach him more respect,” he concluded.Que Deus nos abençoe e nos proteja 🙏🏽⚽️🇧🇷 pic.twitter.com/900xDYtugW— Neymar Jr (@neymarjr) November 16, 2018Where do you see Neymar playing next season in Europe? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Hilcorp announced a five year plan to continue conducting exploration and production activities in the Cook Inlet. According to the application the work is expected to span five years includes: 30 days of 2D seismic survey, 45-60 days of 3D seismic survey, geohazard surveys in the Outer Continenal Shelf (OCS) (30 days), middle Cook Inlet subseawall area (14 days), and Trading Bay (30 days), exploratory wells in the OCS (40-60 days per well, 2-4 wells annually for three years) and Trading Bay (120-150 days), Iniskin Peninsula exploration and development (180 days annually for two years), platform and pipeline maintenance (180 days annually for five years), middle Cook Inlet well abandonment (90 days), and Drift River terminal decommissioning (120 days). The proposed action may incidentally expose marine mammals occurring in the vicinity to sources of harassment, particularly through elevated levels of underwater sound in the marine environment, thereby resulting in incidental take, according to NMFS. NMFS invites the public to provide suggestions, and comments on the Hilcorp’s application and request. Public comments must be received no later than November 26. With that announcement the company was required to file an application for the incidental take of marine mammals with the National Marine Fisheries Service in the Cook Inlet. The MMPA states that the term “take” means to harass, hunt, capture, kill or attempt to harass, hunt, capture, or kill any marine mammal. Hilcorp owns and operates in over 29 oil and has field production facilities, including several located in Cook Inlet. The petition includes all four stages of oil and gas activities: Exploration, development, production, and decommissioning. Last month, Hilcorp, also submitted an application for an underground oil and gas lease for five parcels of Kenai Peninsula Borough land in Anchor Point.last_img read more

first_imgMaldives` former president Mohamed Nasheed speaks during a news conference in Colombo, Sri Lanka on 22 January, 2018. Photo: ReutersThe declaration of a state of emergency in the Maldives and arrest of two senior judges prompted an exiled former president to ask India on Tuesday to send an envoy backed by military to free political prisoners on the tiny Indian Ocean archipelago. Following is background to the crisis engulfing the overwhelmingly Muslim nation of 400,000 people, whose faraway islands are best known as a luxury holiday destination.KEY FIGURESPresident Abdulla Yameen declared the state of emergency on 5 Feb, having defied a shock ruling from the Supreme Court that quashed convictions ranging from terrorism to corruption and ordered the release of nine leading opposition figures, on grounds that the cases against them were politically tainted.Yameen came to power in 2013 after winning an election the opposition said was rigged. Critics accuse his government of imprisoning opponents, curbing free speech and exerting pressure on the judiciary.His rival Mohamed Nasheed, became the Maldives’ first democratically elected president in 2009, but he was forced to resign amid a mutiny by police in 2012. After losing the election to Yameen the following year, Nasheed was sentenced to 13 years in prison in 2015 on charges that he said were concocted by Yameen’s government.Allowed to leave jail to seek medical treatment abroad, Nasheed was granted asylum by Britain in 2016. He has said he wants to contest a presidential election due later this year, and was in Colombo when Supreme Court decision precipitated the crisis. After Yameen declared a 15-day emergency on Tuesday, Nasheed called on India, the main regional power, to intervene.Nasheed, a graduate of Britain’s Liverpool University, is well connected in the West and has been able to bring pressure against Yameen’s administration.During his imprisonment, human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, the wife of Hollywood actor George Clooney, championed his cause and helped expose alleged human rights violations by Yameen’s administration.Back during his presidency, Nasheed had drawn world attention to the Maldives by conducting an underwater cabinet meeting, with the ministers wearing scuba diving suits, to highlight the dangers posed by global warming to low-lying island nations like his own.SUPREME COURT RULINGWhile quashing the convictions against Nasheed and eight other opposition leaders, and ordering the release of those in detention, the court said that they should be re-tried.It also ordered the reinstatement of 12 lawmakers who had been stripped of their parliamentary seats by Yameen’s party for defecting last year, saying their removal was unconstitutional.The reinstatement of the dozen legislators, who now belong to opposition parties, would cause Yameen’s party to lose its majority in the 85-member assembly.Should the opposition reach a majority, they would be able to unseat the speaker, who is a member of the ruling party, and pass no confidence motions against government officials.YAMEEN’S RESPONSEDeclaring the emergency, Yameen’s office issued a statement saying the court order had disrupted functions of the executive and infringed national security and public interest. It also said the constitution could eventually be undermined if the court order was implemented. (http://bit.ly/2EKFYnm)The president’s office said some rights have been restricted under the emergency and some laws suspended, though no curfew has been ordered. It gave assurances for the safety of Maldivians and foreigners.Having imposed the state of emergency, Yameen ordered the arrest of the country’s chief justice and another top judge, and security forces seized control of the Supreme Court.In a televised address to the nation, Yameen said he had acted to prevent a coup and implied the judges had sided with his enemies as they were under investigation for corruption.The president had earlier fired two police chiefs who said they would uphold the court order to release Yameen’s opponents.The army appears to be supporting Yameen. On Sunday, state television showed several police and soldiers saying they were ready to sacrifice their lives “in the defence of the lawful government”.Yameen’s supporters have shut down an independent television station.NASHEED’S REACTIONIn a Twitter post, Nasheed requested India to send an envoy, backed by its military, to release the judges and political detainees. He also urged the United States to block financial transactions of Yameen’s government.New Delhi sent troops to the Maldives in 1988 to foil a coup, purportedly involving foreign mercenaries.INTERNATIONAL REACTIONThe United States and India have urged Yameen to heed the court decision, but he has disregarded international calls to solve the crisis through dialogue.China, which has boosted its investments in the Maldives, said the crisis should be settled internally.The Maldives withdrew from the Commonwealth, the association of former British colonies and dominions, in 2016 after being threatened with suspension for failing to show progress on democracy.last_img

first_imgRuhul Kabir Rizvi.File photoBNP on Sunday described prime minister Sheikh Hasina’s ‘tea party’ at Ganabhaban as pleasure without conscience and said no democracy-loving party leader joined it, reports UNB.”The tea party arrangement by a regretless government after a grand vote robbery reminds me a famous saying by Mahatma Gandhi ‘pleasure without conscience’. This pleasure is a social sin,” said BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi.Speaking at a press conference at BNP’s Naya Paltan central office, he also said the tea part by a ‘euphoric’ government formed through a ‘farcical’ election is tantamount to pleasure without conscience.”No democracy-loving party and those who are in a democratic movement didn’t join the event of sin committed by the government which betrayed the nation and looted people’s votes. This is the victory of people,” Rizvi said.Prime minister Sheikh Hasina hosted the tea party at her official residence Ganabhaban on Saturday for the leaders of political parties who had joined dialogues with her before the 11th general election.Leaders of all the political parties, except the Jatiya Oikya Front, including the BNP, and the Left Democratic Alliance (LDA), attended the tea party. Turning down the results of the 30 December election and bringing the allegation of vote robbery, Oikya Front and LDA demanded a fresh election.Rizvi said now there is no democracy in Bangladesh as the state is now under the grip of an individual and a party. “The people of Bangladesh have now become the slaves of the sate due to demolition of democracy.”He also alleged that the country’s ‘most popular’ leader Khaleda Zia has been kept in jail while thousands of BNP leaders and activists have been arrested in ‘false’ cases only to protect the one-party rule.He alleged that the government not only demonstrated a bizarre attitude but also mocked people by filing ‘fictitious’ cases against dead persons, paralysed patients and expatriates leaving in different countries.last_img read more

first_imgBimanThe managing director of Biman Bangladesh Airlines AM Masaddique Ahmed has been relieved of his duties, reports UNB.Civil aviation and tourism secretary Mohibul Haque confirmed it to UNB on Wednesday.He said Biman director (operation) captain Farhad Hasan Zamil will perform as acting managing director until a new MD is appointed.The decision was taken at a meeting of Biman managing committee on Tuesday night following allegations of irregularities and corruption in Biman, he said.A new managing director will be appointed within 15 June, he added.last_img

first_imgUrban reflections, is a collection of realistic and surreal images of Bombay (Mumbai, India), as seen by me, over the last seven years. These images capture the rapidly changing life in Mumbai, which has adopted the path of vertical growth during the last decade.The exhibition being held on March 13 to 23 at Arpana Caur Gallery at Academy of Fine Arts and Literature, Sri Fort Institutional Area, marks a significant departure in the professional career of well-known photojournalist Chandu Mhatre. After shooting all major news events unfolding in India in the past four decades, he has lately been focusing on what can be characterized as fine art photography.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Although the pictures that form Urban Reflections are primarily motivated by artistic considerations, they also tell the urban story of Mumbai’s soul. Urban Reflections is a result of Mhatre’s many journeys through Mumbai to chronicle how the city has changed under the impact of globalization and economic liberalization. The aim has been to capture the city far from its stereotypical images and give the city a touch of fine art photography.This ‘makeover’ in the name of ‘development’ is changing the city’s skyline rapidly; in their quest for materialism, people are uprooted from their cultural moorings thereby resulting in urban chaos. Sea links, highways and flyovers inundated with vehicles have added to the frantic pace of life. The resulting images are seen reflected, on mirrored walls, windows and doors. Contemporary life in Mumbai is a vibrant kaleidoscope of colours and images. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe continuous flow of migrants to Mumbai makes it a melting pot of cultures and traditions. People from all levels of society come with hope, intellectual inputs, traditional values, religious beliefs and cultural nuances. They provide manpower needed to keep the city running. This in turn has an impact on urban life, creating opportunities as well as tensions due to conflicts of interest, beliefs, values and their survival instinct.Based in New Delhi and Mumbai, India, Mhatre has worked for a wide variety of international media groups and global organizations.  Apart from all the leading publications, leading international and Indian magazines and newspapers as well as a variety of global organizations has published his works.  Chandu’s pictures have been extensively used by UNICEF, UNDP, United Press International, Associated Press, Reuters News Agency, Fortune, Forbes, Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, Washington Post, Geo, The Times London, The Independent, The Guardian, The Telegraph, Marg Publications, CBS 60 Minutes, Debonair, India Today, Bombay Magazine, The Illustrated Weekly of India, Onlooker, Mirror, Imprint, The Times of India and The Indian Express.Additionally, Chandu documented Portuguese history in Goa for the Institute of Cultural affairs in Macau, Government of Portugal. He photographed a book on The Warli for Lalit Kala Akadami. He has also researched and worked with CBS 60 Minutes for their program in India, 50 years of IIT, AIDS, Medical Tourism, Most beautiful woman in world, Aishwarya Rai and Bikram Yoga. He photo documented 1st Jazz Yatra, which was organized by The Bombay group in Mumbai in 1978.He also specializes in fine art photography and archive exhibition photo printing for which he has set up his own printing unit. At present he is working on photo features and projects in India on human, social and environmental issues.When: March 13 to 23Where: Arpana Caur Gallery at Academy of Fine Arts and Literature, 4/6 Sri Fort Institutional Arealast_img read more

first_imgKolkata: The Maulana Azad College authorities have decided to postpone the Annual Inter-College Students’ Fest in the wake of unrest between two groups of students. Trouble brewed during organising the event.A clash had broken out in the college on March 7 and four students were injured. The annual event of the college was scheduled to be held on March 22 and 23. The college principal’s office issued a notification in this regard on Saturday night. “The situation in the college has been tense since Thursday and there have been sporadic instances of clashes. This has prompted us to postpone the event,” a senior college official said. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseA source in the college said the clash broke out between two student groups with each one intending to have control of the funds for the two-day event. The situation turned so violent that forces from two police stations —Taltala and New Market — had to intervene to bring situation under control. The practical examination of third-year students was going on at the college at the time of the clash and tension on the college premises created panic among the examinees. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataIt may be mentioned that local MP Sudip Bandopadhyay had attended a programme in the college in the morning and had announced some funds from his MPLAD for construction of the ladies hostel at the college. Soon after Bandyopadhay left, the two groups of students picked up a fight with each other. The Trinamool Chatra Parishad unit in the college however attributed the violence to outsiders who were against organising the annual college event. The event was scheduled to be held after a gap of five years.last_img read more

first_imgPolice search for missing woman Police search for missing woman Punter found hiding in bushes Download our app  – You can download our free app for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store , or get the Android version from Google Play .  Follow StokeonTrentLive on Facebook –   Like our Facebook page to get the latest news in your feed and join in the lively discussions in the comments. Click here to give it a like! Follow us on Twitter –   For breaking news and the latest stories,  click here to follow SOTLive on Twitter . Follow us on Instagram – Featuring pictures past and present from across Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire & South Cheshire – and if you tag us in your posts, we could repost your picture on our page! We also put the latest news in our Instagram Stories.  Click here to follow StokeonTrentLive on Instagram . Punter found hiding in bushes Follow StokeonTrentLive Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLive Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Driver named following fatal collision Driver named following fatal collision Dad slams ‘disgusting’ hospital window Get the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailFlood alerts are in place on rivers across North Staffordshire this morning (Sunday April 28). The Environment Agency have Flood Alerts, issued shortly before 8pm last night, are in place for the River Trent in the Potteries and in Stone, as well as  the River Churnet and River Tean in the Staffordshire Moorlands. The area saw consistent heavy rain throughout Saturday as Storm Hannah hit the region. Highways England are also reporting on the M6 at junction 16 (Crewe/Stoke-on-Trent). A Highways England spokesman said: “Take care when entering the motorway northbound at J16 Barthomley. “Traffic Officers are on scene with a lane closure due to flooding. Maintenance crews on route to assist clearing.” One reader has also contacted us to reporting flooding on Wellfield Road in Bentilee near Farleigh Grove. A total of four flood alerts are currently in force across England – with three of them in Staffordshire and the other in Shropshire. Flood Alerts mean flooding is possible and are the lowest of the three levels issued by the Environment Agency – with no flooding of properties anticipated in the area. The alert for the Trent in the Potteries says:  “Flooding is affecting low-lying land and roads adjacent to the River Trent between Norton Green and Darlaston including Stoke-on-Trent, Lyme Brook between Newcastle under Lyme and Hanford, Fowlea Brook at Stoke-on-Trent and Ford Green Brook.” Read MoreRolling road blocks on M6 and delays as wide load travels through region today   The alert for the Trent near Stone said:  “Flooding may affect low-lying land and roads adjacent to the River Trent between Darlaston and Great Haywood including Stone.” The Flood Alert for the River Churnet and Tean states:  “River levels are rising at the Leek river gauge as a result of persistent heavy rainfall. “Flooding is affecting low-lying land and roads adjacent to the River Churnet between Leek and Rocester and the River Tean between Adderley and Spath including Cecilly Brook at Cheadle.” Flood Alerts and Warnings explainedThe Environment Agency issues three levels of flood alert and warning. Flood Alerts: The most common and least severe, these mean flooding is possible and to be prepared. Flood Warnings: A step up from an alert, a Flood Warning means flooding is expected and immediate action is required. Severe Flood Warnings: The most serious. These mean there is severe flooding and a danger to live. Both Flood Warnings and Severe Flood Warnings are exceptionally rare in Stoke-on-Trent, North Staffordshire and South Cheshire.   Water levels are set to remain high until around 10am on the Trent in the Potteries, 2pm on the Trent in Stone, and 8pm on the Churnet and Tean. The latest Met Office Weather Forecast for the region said further rain was expected, but nowhere near the amount there was on Saturday. The forecast states:  “Sunday will start rather cloudy with the odd spot of rain possible. Skies will brighten during the morning to give sunny spells and isolated showers through the afternoon. Much lighter winds than Saturday and feeling warmer in the sunshine.” A Yellow Weather Warning for wind as a result of Storm Hannah expired at 3pm yesterday. Read MoreTop stories on StokeonTrentLivelast_img read more

first_imgPhilippe DaumanInvestment in big data, new distribution approaches and content and a focus on events will help Viacom “turn the corner” and deliver “a new period of prosperity and growth” according to Philippe Dauman, president and CEO.Speaking to analysts after reporting less than stellar fourth quarter and full year financials, Dauman cautioned that progress would  “require a focus on the long-term health and vitality” of the business.Dauman highlighted Viacom’s investment in Vantage, its big data engine to deliver targeted advertising, and Viacom Play Plex, the set of branded mobile apps it launched internationally in October, as examples of the kind of innovation that would deliver value. He said that Viacom aimed to triple the number of clients using Vantage ahead of its 2016 upfront.Answering analyst questions, Dauman said that Play Plex would “open up multiplatform revenue in different parts of the world”.Viacom reported that its Nick App had passed the milestone of 20 million downloads across iOS, Android, Xbox and Roku, while its Nick Jr App has passed two million downloads. Overall, Viacom’s digital video views increased by 340% over the year.Dauman said that Viacom could look to subscription video-on-demand rather than traditional distribution to secure growth in China. He said that China was “a potentially significant growth market” but one which was “somewhat limited in the traditional distribution of television”.Dauman said that Viacom would also invest in more short-form “and even longer form content” for new platforms, with the creation of a new mobile video production capability in Los Angeles and New York, “as well as internationally”.Solid growth in domestic and international channel distribution fees failed to offset a poor domestic advertising business, a decline in the performance of the movies business and the impact of a strong dollar for Viacom in its fourth financial quarter, with revenues dropping 5% to US$3.79 billion (€3.52 billion).Excluding a negative 3% impact of foreign exchange movements, the channels business grew by 5% to US$2.79 billion, with international advertising performing better than the domestic ad business. The film business’s revenues dropped 24% in the quarter to US$1.025 billion, and was down23% for the full year, thanks to the strong performance last year of Transformers: Age of Extinction.Revenue for the full year amounted to US$13.268 billion, down 4%, and adjusted operating income fell by 5% to US$3.92 billion.Dauman said Viacom’s predominantly youth-focused brands had been hit early by the wave of disruption in the audiovisual media business, but that there signs of progress were emerging. Citing research that showed millennials were spending more time consuming media than sleeping, Dauman quipped that “apparently, media executives aren’t the only ones losing sleep in this modern world”.last_img read more

first_imgRon Netolitzky, Bob Quartermain, Duane Poliquin, Ron Parratt, Ross Beaty, Jim O’Rourke Moderated by Louis James, Casey Research The following is a video recording of the Casey Research Explorers’ League panel – moderated by Louis James – at the Cambridge House Investment Conference in Vancouver, January 2012. Listen to the valuable information and guidance passed along by some of the most successful mineral explorers in the world… or read the transcript below. [Ron Netolitzky, Bob Quartermain, Duane Poliquin, Ron Parratt, Ross Beaty, and Jim O’Rourke are some of the “serially successful mine finders” that over the years have literally made fortunes for Casey Research subscribers. And now there’s a new generation of emerging natural resource giants that we are watching closely: The Casey NexTen – young professionals who already have remarkable successes under their belt… and a great future ahead of them. Learn who the NexTen are and why it could pay off big to start following them today. ] TRANSCRIPT Hosted by Louis James, Chief Metals and Mining Investment Strategist, Cambridge House Vancouver Investment Conference L: Thank you very much again for coming down. Welcome. Explorers’ League panel. As you may or may not know… how many people are subscribers? So mostly subscribers…. So, for those few of you who don’t know, the Explorers’ League is Casey Research’s way of honoring what we call the serially successful explorers in our business: the people who have found not just one economic mine but several, multiple times and mines on a scale that really matter, a million ounces plus of gold equivalent or better. So these guys are mine finders – a company by that name just got bought, but these are the guys that actually do it or have done it several times over. We’ve got Ron Netolitzky, we’ve got Bob Quartermain, we’ve got Duane Poliquin, and if I’ve got my heads right here, we’ve got Ron Parratt, Ross Beaty, and Jim O’Rourke, who just built the Copper Mountain Mine. That’s your fifth mine, Jim? Jim O’Rourke: Pardon? L: Copper Mountain is your fifth mine? You’ve lost track, you’ve built so many… fifth or sixth. Is it sixth? All right, onto the seventh in Gold Mountain. So anyway, these are the guys who have done it. These guys are, in our view, the best in the business. We are always having our doors open when they have a story to tell us, when they have a new project coming, we’re all ears, because these are the guys who know how to get it done and have done so repeatedly. So, I guess, we’ll just go down the row a little bit and take it one tranche at a time. Ron, if you can tell us what are you working on now, what’s happening now that you’re most keen to discuss and bring to people’s attention, and we’ll go back the other direction and talk about what’s coming next. Ron Netolitzky: My main work has been an “instant success” called Golden Band where we finally started pouring some gold; and now I’m hoping I can get away from operations and engineering and do what I really want to do in the belt, which is explore it for the deposits I haven’t found or our guys haven’t found. So that’s the main thing. I’m watching northwest BC; I think it’s exciting. We worked a bit in the Yukon through a company called Aben last year, and we were one of the few guys who at least had a drill success, but the market never appreciates it. I don’t think anybody made any money on Yukon stocks last year unless you sold early. L: Wait: before you give up the mic, tell us a little bit more about Golden Band – the symbol’s GBN. It was an agglomeration story. You had all these satellite deposits. You’ve got an old mill for a dollar or something like that, and you put it all together. Ron: Yes, it was a story that basically I got involved in the La Ronge Gold Belt in the early ’60s for an oil company, so I kind of knew it was there. And then I got into the uranium business, and then 1977 came along, Three Mile Island came along, and the next week, my consulting business wasn’t looking so hot anymore, so I started staking claims in the La Ronge Gold Belt. They ended up in a lot of joint ventures, a lot of other companies, one that disappeared off the board called Golden Rule. It got salted in Ghana – well after I left. And we got back into the La Ronge Gold Belt about 1994 with an associated mine called Komis. Klaus Lehnert-Thiel is VP of exploration, and it’s his till techniques that allowed us to find a whole bunch of new deposits and new discoveries. And we’re continuing with that game, and right now we’re mining one that’s unusual, and there are some samples at my booth called the EP Zone and we’ve got about 7,000 ounces in the glacial till running around 12 grams, so we’re now just mining into the source of that, and it’s definitely supergene enriched with chalcocite and native copper, which you aren’t supposed to get in the Shield, and the grade of that is getting – probably going to approach an ounce, and then we’ll get into some primary ore, but that whole thing was supposed to be 9,000 ounces, and I think at the start of the pit we’ve already probably got 9,000 ounces on the stockpile, so it’s been a lot of fun. L: Very good. So if you’re moving on from the engineering, then I guess… you’ll let us know when is the next Ron Netolitzky play for us to get involved in? Ron: Well, I think the next play is the same company. I think I got some excellent expiration targets to maybe find the deposits that are going to give the belt some respect. I think there’s natural evidence of a lot of bulk mineable targets there that people haven’t worried about and definitely we have proven that – and history has proven there are lots of small, high-grade narrow-vein systems there. But I think there’s opportunity for bigger deposits – low grade – that could be exciting. I am playing in northern BC, but frankly, I’m after a property. Until I get it, I wouldn’t bring anybody else in because it’s somebody I consider a little haywire that controls it. L: All right. Bob, everybody here probably knows or has heard about the Pretium story. We gave you an award – a Best of Show award – so I don’t want to repeat ourselves too much, but we got a question this morning maybe you can take on. The stock is trading at its all-time high. I mean it’s a new stock, but still it’s trading at its 52-week high, all-time high, whatever you want to call it. Can you persuade us that this is a good time to buy, or should we wait for a correction or what happens next with Pretium? Is there enough value added in the very-near term that it makes sense to buy Pretium at $16 right now? Bob Quartermain: Right. As you know, I came out of retirement last year to take on the Pretium opportunity; and we did it on the thesis that there would be a high-grade gold opportunity sitting in the much larger bulk tonnage mineralization. When you think about it, today we’ve outlined North America’s second-largest gold resource, 38 million ounces of measured Indicated resources, another 28 million ounces of Inferred, and within that we have now got about 8 million tonnes of mature running between 19 and 20 grams for about 5 million ounces. That continues to be open in all directions. It’s open down dip, it’s open along strike, and certain open at depth, and so there is still an opportunity there to add to the ounces identified to date. There is a lot of catalyst coming out this year in this quarter. We are going to complete a preliminary economic study on the high grade. The one we did in June last year was based off last year’s resource, not this year’s resource. We expect to have that this quarter. We are currently de-watering underground, and we’ve got a permit in place to actually drive a development expiration added from the Old West zone across into the Valley of the Kings. We’ll have an updated PEA also on a bulk tonnage opportunity, because this is what we think is an “Osisko.” Besides the very high-grade material, which sits within 1- to 2-gram material around it. We did a flow-through [financing] we announced the other day, so we’ve got the money to go back and we will be drilling aggressively, not only expanding on the resource but also doing in-field drilling, so we can move it on and complete a feasibility study by the end of this year. So throughout the year, there are going to be a lot of data points coming up, particularly starting in this quarter, and so I guess I would say, “I still own all my stock, and I’m not a seller.” L: Just one more question. This was discovered in Silver Standard. When you were there at Silver Standard, did you know it was going to get this big? Did you have a feeling like, “Yeah, this is it,” or how much luck is involved here? Bob: Largely luck. When I retired from Silver Standard in 2010, there was only a small resource at Bruce Jack, and there were a couple of drill holes that had hit some higher-grade material, and it was over the summer of 2010 that they drilled and then had a few more hits, and one of the drill samples had run a couple of kilos of gold, and I had only ever seen that type of mineralization either at the Royal Ontario Museum or when I worked at Red Lake, and felt if there is an opportunity like that here, then I’d like to have the opportunity to explore it – because like Ron, after doing Silver Standard for 25 years, it’s good to be back sitting on the drill rigs. I was up there in the camp this summer, continued to do sections in the office, and so, no, it’s – when Don McCloud at New Hawk did it, this was a blind deposit. They never saw it. No surface expression. It was just us methodically drilling every 50 and 100 meters. We lucked into the high-grade gold, and now we really know where to focus our drilling. L: Very good. Duane, we’ve had a lot of questions about Almaden, and Ixtaca zone started out so sexy and exciting, but then it seems you’re still hitting drill results but not quite the ones we had earlier on. Tell us a little bit about Almaden in general and about Ixtaca. What happens next and – Duane Poliquin: What we’ve been doing for a number of years is, let me start – if you take Nevada, in western Nevada is the Comstock lode, which was discovered early, and then the tectonic plate that’s shoving under North America, on the leading edge of that, you get copper-gold porphyries like Bingham Canyon, and you get all the Carlin-type stuff. And so we kind of applied that idea to Mexico, and over a period of years we took a helicopter – my son all the time and me with him as much as possible – and we sampled every intrusive center in eastern Mexico and every volcanic center from the American border clear down to Guatemala, and we have information the Mexican government doesn’t have. We age-dated all of those. We did whole-rock analysis, and we got a geological understanding of the eastern half of Mexico. We started staking claims, and part of it was there is no competition there. There’s not even any claims, so we acquired things like Caballo Blanco that had never had a claim on it before. It’s not on any government map, and we found a gold deposit, which we’ve sold to a gold group, and we found a nice copper/gold porphyry that we’re just doing a Titan-24 survey on right now, but it’s shaping up very nicely. Then inland from that a little ways, we found this Ixtaca zone, which also came out of that study, and again never had a claim on it before. It is a brand-new discovery. The only reason it’s still there is it’s covered with a thin veneer of volcanic ash from some volcanoes about 90 miles west of there, so there’s a little outcrop the size of this table in a creek with some little, tiny veins that have epithermal texture in them, so I’m quite proud of that discovery. We’re drilling it right now, and I wouldn’t agree with you that the results aren’t as good. We think they’re damn good results and they keep coming, and every hole we step out it’s there, and so we’re just going to keep – we’ve got four drills there working right now. L: I didn’t say they weren’t good, but we had some, let’s just say, more exciting results earlier on. Duane: Well, stay tuned. We’ve got four drills there right now, and it’s going to keep coming. And there are going to be more, because we’ve staked a whole bunch of things in this belt. We’ve got two other copper/gold porphyries staked that we haven’t had time to get to. We’ve got a bunch of other epithermal things with silver numbers, gold numbers on the surface. We just haven’t had time to get to it yet. We’ll drill this one off, and then we’ll go down the belt. L: Before you pass the mic on, let me ask about Gold Mountain, because some of our readers – because of the potential conflict of interest internally we haven’t recommended it, we haven’t said anything about Gold Mountain, though obviously we always love the Elk deposit. Both of you here – Duane: Well, we’re both here. Jim is – L: Who’s running the show? Who’s going to make Gold Mountain happen? He’s busy perfecting a mine… Duane: Jim has just hired somebody to run the show, I think. He’ll tell you. Do you want to tell him about that, Jim? Okay. Well, they did some drilling last summer, which I was quite delighted with, because we had never chased it into the volcanics, and they chased the zone into the volcanics and got some really nice numbers across underground mining widths and chased it about 400 meters into the volcanics. Everything else was in these vein swarms in the intrusive. So it’s developing nicely, and Jim’s the mining guy, which we’re very delighted to be in with. L: Jim’s going to build out, but you’re still going to have – you have an equity position? Duane: We have a large equity. L: Do you have a lot of input on the exploration? Duane: Yes, indeed. L: That’s what I want to hear because you guys are my favorites. Duane: We’re still there. Morgan is still there. Morgan is on the board of directors. L: Okay, Ron, so you already did a talk about Nevada. People probably don’t need you to do the whole story over again, but bring us up to date on what’s going on with Renaissance and what happens next. Ron Parratt: Sure. Well, as many of you probably know, we’re now about a year out on the spinout of Renaissance from AuEx. We had some good success there up in northeastern Nevada, a brand-new discovery, actually a new district of Carlin-type gold mineralization ended up in a 51-49 joint venture with Fronteer. They bought us, and three months later Newmont bought them for a couple billion dollars. It was quite a nice deal. Within three days of closing the deal with Fronteer, we did the spinout of Renaissance, the same team of people, almost all of the properties we had. Fronteer was only allowed to take the Pequop District properties, and we’ve been doing the same thing. We think the business model works very well. We are focused on continuing at that. We’re going to be very disciplined in our business approach, as we had been before – use other people’s money, leverage the risk out, minimize dilution, and get to discovery. We’ve got 30 projects we are working on now; 10 of those are in joint ventures. We drilled seven last year – Newmont, Sumitomo, Agnico, Eldorado, and some juniors, so a good program. You’ve got to be out drilling holes, taking swings with the bat to have success, so that’s a great focus for us, and we will do more this year, and hopefully we will get to meaningful discovery as soon as we can. L: How many projects are you going to drill this year? Ron: Well, as I said, we did seven this year. I know now that we’ll be drilling three in the first quarter of this year, two in Argentina, and we’ll be starting probably a six-month drilling program at our silver property in western Nevada with Liberty Silver. We know that the Wood Hills results are good enough. None of this is out yet, but they’re good enough that our partners are going to be back with a bigger program there. Sumitomo is already committed to a bigger program at Spruce Mountain. We’re running that program… Early yet in the year for everybody else, but I’m sure we’re going to do a fair bit more this year than we did last year. L: All right. This might be also a question for Ross, but Argentina – as you know we got pretty cold feet about mineral investing in that country. I noticed that the Rio Negro province just re-legalized gold mining – that was a good thing. Do you want to tell us a little bit about your sense of the political risk in Argentina? You’re quite welcome to disagree with the Casey consensus there, but tell us what you think. Ron: Well, we went to the Santa Cruz province first of all because of the endowment. We think it’s a great place to explore and that you can find gold there. It’s not a stretch. You look at the epithermal systems. That area is very early in its exploration history. We see a lot of upside. Obviously there is some political risk. The assessment of the recent change by Cristina looks as though it’s not going to be as great as everybody thought to begin with. Given that it’s Argentina, I think people are going to figure out how to make it even less as time goes on. We don’t see any diminishment of interest by potential partners for our properties down there. I attended an event in Toronto a couple of months ago on Santa Cruz proper through Macquarie. Great turnout, great interest. We’re still very bullish on the area, and we are going to continue working down there. L: All right. Well, Ross, we could probably do a panel just with you. We’ve got Magma, we’ve got Pan American, we’ve got all these different things going on, so I guess start out with your babies, your sweethearts. What are the sweet spots right now? If you’re speaking to an investor who wants to get in on a Ross Beaty play, what two or three things would you tell him to focus on right now? Ross Beaty: I would tell him to buy a portfolio of companies held by these guys, and they’re going to be rich beyond avarice. If you’d done that three years ago, you’d have made a better investment than any other investment portfolio in this entire building. L: That’s actually true. If you did the numbers… Ross: Yes. This is a very smart thing for you to do with a lot of these guys’ companies. Bob has had the best-performing gold stock in the world in 2011 – I had the best-performing copper stock in the world in 2011. These are exploration discoveries, and that’s what we do well. So, you know, it’s a nice – and of course Ron had a fantastic home run in Nevada just a couple of years ago, a mature exploration district, and what did those guys do? They found an entire new gold district in the most heavily explored region in the entire world, right under the nose of all the majors, and Newmont had to come along and pay $2.5 billion to buy it from him. That’s wealth creation by any measure, and it’s wealth creation because he’s a really, really good geologist, and Mark O’Dea is a really, really good geologist, and that’s what makes the discoveries. So, buy the geological talent and listen to guys like Casey who follow these companies and find these guys. The NexTen is another group of smart guys out there, finding the opportunities under the nose of the majors and making their shareholders a ton of money. So, that’s what I would do. L: Okay, well, give us a stock pick here. Lumina is up… Ross: So my little portfolio is a bit of a – it’s a mixed bag. On one hand, you have a large, mature company like Pan American Silver that is a play on silver and that’s going to go up or down depending on what happens to the metal commodity, really, because it is a big company – it trades $100 million of stock a day. This morning we just bought Minefinders for $1.5 billion, and I never thought in my remotest dream I’d ever be buying another company for $1.5 billion. It seems ridiculous, but you know what? It’s going to make a much better, stronger company. It’s a stable blue chip, second-largest silver producer in the world, primary producer in the world. It just doesn’t have the wild swings that you’re going to see with explorers. So that’s at one end. On the other end, I guess, the two companies that I have that are exploration companies – one is called Anfield Nickel, and it’s a nickel exploration stock in Guatemala, but even that is fairly mature because we’re trying to sell it now. I mean, right now, we’re trying to sell the company this year and the largest value added is behind us, so I wouldn’t really recommend that particularly as an exploration stock to follow. You could have asked me the same question that you asked Bob on Pretium with respect to Lumina Copper, which is a copper exploration project in Argentina which I thought had almost no value two years ago and now it’s – I think maybe we can sell it this year for more than $1 billion. It is currently capitalized at about $580 million, so is it too late to buy it? They had an incredible run last year. The stock chart looks like a hockey stick. It actually looks like the accumulation of carbon in the atmosphere over the last thousand years. Kind of… that’s what the stock looks like. So it’s done very well, but it’s trading at $13 and change today, and we think we’ll be able to get more than $20 a share this year and that means it’s pretty decent, relatively low-risk return for most shareholders. It’s got very little downside, and it could maybe not double but come close to doubling. That’s this year. So it’s a decent return there, and that’s a discovery story. That’s pure and simple where luck, I think, has played a huge, huge part. We had a property in Argentina that we didn’t think had much value. We called it the “ugly duckling” of a group of a whole bunch of copper deposits that we sold off over the last few years. Then we just all of a sudden started drilling holes in the right place, and we hit some fabulous copper results, high-grade, clean, huge. I mean everything that the major companies want to buy, and as the year went on, it just got bigger and better, and we’re still drilling fabulous holes. We got seven drills going on the property. It’s going to be – well, it was the biggest discovery of the year in the world last year for copper. There is lots of room for it to continue to grow, but ultimately the game plan is to sell it to a major, and we hope that will happen this year. And then, in the sort of middle, my main focus this year isn’t an exploration stock at all. It’s not even a mining or mineral commodities stock, it’s a clean-energy stock called Alterra Power, the merger between Magma Energy that I started a few years ago and Plutonic Power. Alterra Power for me is kind of like a legacy company. I’m really trying to build it into a huge clean-energy company because I think it’s good for the world, it’s good for my kids, and if I can do good things and make a buck at it and make a good investment case for a company that has appreciating value over time, I’m going to make my shareholders happy as well. So that’s my main focus today. We are over the hump. We are a sustainable business now. We’ve got about $55 million per year of cash generation forever. Forever. This is not a depleting business. Once you build these clean-energy plants from wind or hydro or geothermal power, they go forever, which is an absolutely beautiful thing in contrast to mining, which is a depleting industry. So that’s what I’m doing today. Louis: Sorry. You’re the broken slot machine. Where’s the early pick? Where’s the early-stage, you know, Anfield before it went up, Ventana before it went up, Lumina before it went up – is there one out there? Is there an early-stage Ross play? Ross: Well, yes, but it’s not really ready – it’s not there being packaged for public company or for third-party investors. L: We won’t tell, right, guys? We won’t tell. Ross: Yes. So just watch this space. There you go. L: Watch this space. Then duly program your Google News things to track the name “Ross Beaty.” Okay, Jimmy, you built Copper Mountain. What next? Jim: Well, I think a lot of you had an opportunity to go up there and see it on Saturday; and as you can see, we’re a fairly new company. We went public in 2007, and I think, as Ross says, there was a lot of value added through the exploration. Currently our market cap’s around $600 million, and we’re just getting started as a producer. The mine now is fully operational. Our intent is to optimize it in the next few months, maximize our production, and demonstrate performance. With regard to the exploration aspects, which we seem to be talking about – and I’m not an explorationist – but the property does have some excellent targets. We’ve got a very large property, about 18,000 acres, and we have about 5 billion pounds of resource right now and we believe as we drill some of our Titan-24 anomalies, this is going to increase. I guess lastly we see ourselves as having a very strong base for a growth company as a copper company and precious metals – about 20% of our value in sales right now is precious metals. So it’s our intent to continue to grow the company through exploration, through doing joint ventures with guys who really are successful in finding properties at an early stage, and then also looking at mergers and acquisitions that would help our shareholder value. L: What about the Voigt zone? I remember when we were up there before you built the plant and I was talking, all this copper is great, but I’m worried about copper… what about precious metals, and there were these drill holes in this area called the Voigt zone, just a couple, that suggested you might have a more gold-rich center there. Have we tested that? What’s up with that? Jim: I know, Louis has been pushing me in this direction forever, and this year we did put some drill holes in there. It was thought to be a fairly narrow zone, but there is a very large Titan-24 anomaly there, but they have drilled some of the areas and they did get good gold results. And as I’ve said, I’m not a geologist, so I can’t give you the details right now but we did publish them. L: Follow-up this year? Jim: Pardon? L: Will there be follow-up this year? Jim: Yes. It will be followed up. Definitely. L: Yes. It would be very nice to see a much brighter gold lining to the story there. I mean good insurance. Okay, I can think of lots of questions I can ask these guys all day. I know their projects pretty well, but it’s a rare chance when you get to pick the brains of the best in the business, and here they are, so while you’re here, do you have any questions? Does anybody want to – yes, sir? Ross: So the question was – Pan American Silver has a huge deposit in Argentina called Navidad. It’s the largest undeveloped silver deposit in the world, so it’s really, really big – and the question is what’s going on, and is it going to be developable because it’s in a province of Argentina that banned open-pit mining and the use of cyanide about eight years ago. They kind of swept the baby out with the bathwater because there was a gold deposit in the mountains in a really beautiful area. They didn’t want to mine that, so they said the whole province is off the territory for mining. So this deposit was then discovered. It’s in the middle of nowhere. It’s in a very nice, empty part of this Patagonian plain of Argentina, and it’s a huge deposit. There’s more than a billion ounces of silver, clean. It’s right on surface. It’s a beautiful, beautiful ore body, and it’ll double Pan American Silver’s production from 24 million ounces to 48 million ounces in, say, three years. The province, as Louis just said, the province just north of this particular province of Chubut is called Rio Negro. They also had a ban on the use of cyanide and mining, and they just overturned that in December – at the end of December – so what we expect will happen is in March this year, the government of Chubut has written a new law that’s going to zone the province into places that you can mine and places you can’t mine. The mountains will be no mining, right along the ocean will be no mining, and the center would be pro-mining. We’ve seen the law. The governor assures us it will be passed. There are some processes to go through, but we think it will happen in March, and that will open the way for development of Navidad. That will be a real game-changer for us. L: We’ve seen laws like this before. The Santa Cruz province where Ron’s operating, they also did something like this where they set out an area that was specifically “miners welcome here,” and it happens to be where Ron is operating on the Deseado Massif. So there is precedent there. Okay, more questions. The question was, we’ve heard about going south into Latin America and the idea of the lower-hanging fruit having been picked and having to go farther afield to look for big, world-class deposits; are you guys doing that? Are any of you looking to go into what might have previously been regarded as too risky or not worth the trouble? Where are the new frontiers, and is anybody taking them on? Ron? Ron Netolitzky: I think I’m coming to the conclusion that I’m liking working where the jurisdictions are as safe as I can get at my age. I mean you have enough exploration risk in this world to take on excessive political risk. Now, if there’s a wonderful deposit that’s already been identified, then you can look at it and say you play it from the political risk because you’ve got no exploration risks, but taking both on – not for me. Bob: Well, we’re in British Columbia and although some people think there’s risk around that, we think it’d be mitigated. Projects have been developed here, with what Jim’s just done, so projects get permitted in development here, and I’m a bit like Ron nowadays… keeping my focus a little closer to home. Duane: Well, as I described earlier, we went into Eastern Mexico where we had no competition. Many of the things we’ve staked never had a claim on it before, and we’re getting incredible assays, and two things are already obvious – one going to be a mine and one that we think will be a mine and we’re just getting started in that area, but the other frontier is depth. You look at the Hudson Bay Mining in Flin Flon, Manitoba. They were mining there for 80 years, and they just found as big a zone, not just found, but a few years ago, found as big a zone as they had mined for 80 years underneath, straight below. I mean they’re mining stuff that’s 4% copper and 7% zinc and a quarter-ounce gold, and it’s underneath, so there’s going to be a lot of exploration to depth. There are these new techniques where you can see deeper with geophysics, and in old areas where there are lots of mines, people are going to go down to depth. Look at Pebble, the discovery at depth, and look at Oyu Tolgoi. There’s going to be more exploration to depth in old, established areas. Ron Parratt: Our company – in addition to Argentina and of course Nevada, we’re working in Spain. So far, we’ve found the political environment to be reasonable. Things don’t happen quite as quickly as we want, but we do have worries about obviously the Spanish economy, problems in Portugal, all over Europe right now. And it seems to me that people are just afraid to make decisions because all the government employees don’t want to lose their jobs, and if they make a decision and approve a project or grant a license, they worry that the next group coming in will hold them at fault for that, and they’ll lose their jobs and they don’t want to lose their government jobs. You have to be pretty careful. If it’s in Argentina, some provinces, as you’ve just heard, are good to be in; some are not so good to be in. I work a lot in the US; I would not work in California. There are other states I’m not going to go to. You have to pick your battles pretty carefully. I agree with Ron. Exploration is really risky, and if you risk losing the asset you might find on top of the discovery risk, you really need to ask yourself if that’s the right thing to do, so we’re going to stick with the countries we are in now. We’ll stay in the Americas. I think Mexico would be okay, but as a small junior company we can’t be working in too many countries. I think we’ll lose focus, and I think that’ll be a bad thing. Ross: I look at this question really from the standpoint of standing in your shoes as an investor, and I guess my bottom line to this is, don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Diversify your risks. Don’t buy one company, buy a handful of companies. Don’t invest in exploration in one country, invest in a pile of countries, because you just never know. There are so many risks in this game – not just geologic risk or mining risk but political risk, social risk, environmental risk, stupid risk that just makes no sense to anybody – but it happens and it just happens all the time. Australia – once thought to be the safest, best, lowest-tax jurisdiction – a few years ago brought in an absolutely idiotic, insane super province tax that destroyed Australia as a good place to do business. Luckily, the industry had such a big lobby power that they were able to stop the government from doing that, but BC, just a short eight or nine years ago, we had a bunch of socialists running this place, and they made a mess of it. They made an absolute mess of it. It was a horrible place to explore because they didn’t give you any value. So things can change really quickly, and you just – you can be awfully clever about assessing a risk regime in terms of political and social environmental risk, but crazy things happen. And so for me, I’m invested in 18 countries right now; and I happen to know every single year there’s going to be one that is just absolutely wonderful beyond my expectations, and there’s going to be one that’s just a nightmare – again, beyond my expectations. The other principle I have, though, is “Life is too short.” And that means don’t go to places that are just pathologically criminal like Russia and most of the CIS. Both Bob Quartermain and I have joint experience in that. There are some parts of the world that are just super-tough that are, you know, no matter what the opportunity, it’s just not worth the effort, and I put sort of Venezuela today in that category, quite frankly Bolivia, maybe Ecuador, places like that, certain countries in Africa, anywhere in the CIS. Life’s too short. It doesn’t matter what the reward. If you have to deal with criminals and people are trying to steal from you every single second, it’s just not worth it. Jim: Well, I think I have to agree with Ron and Ross in that, number one, of course, you’ve got a lot of risk, and I guess you have to weigh the political risk. If you had a fantastic deposit, you’d probably take a little more political risk, but I think as Ross said, I’m of an age too where I’m not going to venture out too far, and I don’t have a bulletproof jacket, so I’m not going to take a lot of risk in terms of going to places where you don’t know whether you really own anything or whether you can hold it or if somebody is going to take it, so I’m along that line too. L: This is very, very interesting. Jimmy, I put you a little bit on the spot there because of where you’re focused, but I wanted to see if I could get unanimity, and basically we got unanimity. These are the most successful, best brains in the business and this conventional – it’s become almost conventional wisdom that the low-hanging fruit has been picked. We’ve got to go farther afield, and we have unanimity here saying, “You know what? Life’s too short. Go where you know you can work,” so that’s something – it would be interesting to ask the same question at the NexTen panel and see if slightly darker average color of hair would give the same unanimous response. But no, that’s very interesting. Words from the wise. Okay, I think we have time for maybe one more question. Copper. Maybe a real quick two sentences, thumbs up/thumbs down on copper. You know, we have the bearish argument near-term about economic trouble. Doug Casey is talking about the Greater Depression and all these things, obviously bearish for industrial metals. We’ve got two copper producers sitting here. Obviously you want to be optimistic about copper – the world needs it. Chindia, all these things. Ron Netolitzky, just a quick take. Are you – long-term we’re all bulls on copper because we know the world needs it, but near-term, this year – are you buying copper plays and would you? Ron Netolitzky: I would look at any mineral. I think they all have their opportunities, and in this business I’m not short-term cycled. I mean, when everything comes out of favor, it’s actually a great time to start playing in it, and you’ve got to be really contra-cyclic. We all pretend to be, but it’s a hard decision to make because when everybody hates it is when you should love it. Bob: Right, and I go to a comment that Ross made earlier about buying people around the table. I’m a Lumina shareholder, and I’m a very happy Lumina shareholder and I’m adding it to my position because of the exploration upside that’s there. Same as my own company. I’ve owned Ron’s companies, I’ve owned Duane’s companies as well as Ross’s, and so long-term I continue to be very bullish on copper and continue to own it in my portfolio, both major companies as well as members sitting around this table. Same with uranium. I’m with Ron on this. I think now is the time to be out there buying and I don’t think you need to be concerned about what happens this year. If you’re doing that, then you really have to look at exploration as a very long-term gain. With Ross I started investing in silver back in 1993-94. That has served me very well, and I’ll continue to invest in the people around this table and the commodities that they’re looking for, and I think that’s a strategy that I’d follow. Duane: In the short term, you know, everybody – just open the paper or watch the television. Every government in the world is in debt, and they can’t pay them, and there’s all this mess, but you know what – the world isn’t going to end. I mean even the ’30s, which was so terrible, it came to an end and life went on, and a lot of good life went on, so in the short term, I think precious metals are a good place to be because they’ve got to settle their debts, and they’ve got to do something, and they’ve got to make people believe in money again, and so on. So I think precious metals in the short term are a very good place to be, but there used to be an old expression, “Copper is king,” and copper is the main metal of civilization, and it will go on and on and on, and as all these things get sorted out and human ingenuity and despite governments, things will be good, so long term I think copper is a great thing. Ron Parratt: I certainly agree with Duane. I think a lot of the exploration plays we’re looking at now are of course copper for the future. These aren’t going to come out of the ground this year. We’re looking at two, three, four years away, depending on the municipality that they’re located in, so I think, really, you need to be thinking about the longer-term price environment and of course it’s very deposit-specific. Each commodity has a range of production costs by commodity. You always want to try to look at those in the lower-cost curve position that are going to be sustainable long-term. They’re the ones that are going to do well, and especially if prices go down and you’re a lower-quartile producer, you’re going to have a good company. L: Ross, I’m a little bit nervous about giving you a chance. Ross: Okay, so here’s my pitch. So how many of you were at the Casey conference – where was it? – it was in Phoenix last November, October? L: Yes, October. Ross: So there’s a Casey conference in October. Were any of you there? A handful. So here was a room – now October, I admit, was kind of a bleak time. There were a lot of European governments looking pretty iffy, and there was a lot of doom and gloom in the US still, of course there always is when you get a group of Casey investors together. I mean the whole bloody conference is all about, “What are we going to buy when everything melts down? We’re going to buy guns and drugs so we can sell them.” It was like one of these, you know – I mean, take a happy pill. That’s kind of what I felt, and I was the only voice of optimism. L: This is true; true story. Ross: The only voice, and here we are in January, things are looking better. Copper price is up, gold price is up, silver price is up – you know what, Europe is going to live, it’s not going to die, and we are not going into a vortex of hell, financial hell – we just aren’t – and I think Duane’s comment is valid. Every day there are more people who are born, we all want junk, there are more people getting into a monetary system coming from farms into cities, more people with more money means more people want junk, junk means commodities, commodities are what we produce and discover. So there are two sides to this copper coin. There is the demand side. Demand is strong for copper. It is being driven by all these new people in the world, the new monetary or the new people who have money in the world in India, in Indonesia, in China and Brazil and Russia and all kinds of huge population areas – forget about Europe. Who cares about Europe? In copper on the demand side, Europe is a non-event. It doesn’t matter – even the US. The US today, nothing in the US drives copper demand. Copper demand is driven by what’s happening in the emerging countries, and it’s going crazy there. Copper demand in China went up 8% last year. The world built more automobiles last year than they’ve even built in history – I forget the number, but it was a record number of cars, and cars today use more copper than they have ever used before because there is more want, more need for, motors in the cars, there are more hybrid cars. They just use more copper, so the demand side of copper is fantastic. It’s not going to melt down, it’s good, it’s strong. But what a lot of these pundits who even know the demand side don’t understand is, on the copper supply side, it’s equally bullish. We aren’t finding as much copper as we’re mining. We aren’t finding it because the big deposits have been discovered. The new deposits are harder to find. They’re not as big. They’re not as rich. You can’t see it from a satellite by and large like you used to. These are big, big deposits, and we are just not replacing consumption as much, and long term that’s just as bullish for higher copper prices as increased demand. Now, of course it’s not going to go up forever. At some point, there’s going to be a price that people are going to stop consuming it or finding replacements, and they are going to start mining some of these really, really low-grade deposits of which there are a number in the world. But just to mine those takes five to ten years of permitting and financing and construction. Construction costs have gone off the chart, so mines are harder to build today, they’re harder to permit, they’re much harder to discover. If you look at a chart – there’s a very cool chart that a group called the Mineral Economics Group has put out, which charts exploration expenditures for copper against discovery rates. It’s an inverse curve. The more we’re spending on copper exploration in the last 10 years, the less we’re actually finding. The existing mines are becoming lower grade. They are becoming deeper. They’re becoming more high-cost. The only way that supply equation can be matched with the increased demand is with higher prices, so I am bullish on copper for both of those reasons. Jim: I don’t think I can add anything to that, but I do agree, I mean, long-term we have the demand. We have a shortage of supply. It’s going to be difficult to meet the difference, but also the cost of production. I mean, as the costs of production go up, the price has to be there, or else we’re not going to have copper, so I have to be bullish on copper, and I feel very fortunate that we’re in production at this time to enjoy the future. L: Okay, with that, I think we better take a break. In 10 minutes, Jeff Clark will be back here to tell us about buying and owning gold and silver. Thank you very much. Gentleman, thank you very much – a great panel.last_img read more

first_imgThe long-running breast milk vs. formula debate made headlines earlier this week.The New York Times reported that the Trump administration had tried to remove language from a WHO resolution that would, according to reporter Andrew Jacobs, “promote and protect breastfeeding around the world, especially in developing countries” and limit the promotion of infant formula.President Donald Trump tweeted his rationale for the U.S. position: “The failing NY Times Fake News story today about breast feeding must be called out. The U.S. strongly supports breast feeding but we don’t believe women should be denied access to formula. Many women need this option because of malnutrition and poverty.”Public health professionals have a different perspective: In poor countries, a mother’s decision about breastfeeding can be critical for her baby’s survival. That’s because formula carries special risks for low-income families.The first problem arises because powdered formula requires a dependable source of clean water, which is not available to some 780 million people, according to the World Health Organization. “In countries where women live in poor households with poor sanitation, it becomes a matter of life and death,” says Rafael Perez-Escamilla, director of Global Health Concentration at the Yale School of Public Health. “If the water is not clean, formula becomes a death sentence for the infant.”Even in the best of circumstances, formula feeding has disadvantages. According to decades of research analyzed and summarized in a 2016 Lancet series on breastfeeding, the harm caused by formula feeding includes increased risk of diarrhea and respiratory infections. In addition, according to the Lancet series, more than 800,000 formula-fed infants who die each year could be saved by breastfeeding mostly by reducing diarrhea, respiratory infections and malnutrition from diluted formula. Breast milk has been proven, over decades of research, to be unarguably the best nutrition for babies with its nearly perfect mix of easily digested vitamins, protein and fat. In addition, new research in the July 2017 JAMA Pediatrics has shown that beneficial bacteria from the mother colonize in the baby’s gut, helping the infant establish a healthy microbiome — bacteria in the intestine that help fight disease throughout life. Because the bacteria are unique to mother and baby, the establishment of the microbiome has been called nature’s first personalized medicine and cannot be replicated in formula.Harms from formula-feeding fall disproportionately on poor women in poor countries, says Perez-Escamilla, not only because of unsanitary drinking water but also because of poverty. Purchasing formula can use 30 percent or more of an impoverished family’s income, he says. “Then, women start diluting the formula to make it last longer,” he says. Drinking watered down formula leads to malnourishment, illness and even death. “And then, too, the money spent on formula is not available for other things the baby might need, like health care,” he says.No additional research is needed to prove that breast milk is the gold standard of nutrition for infants, says Dr. Adriano Cattaneo, an epidemiologist retired from the Unit for Health Services Research and International Health, Institute for Child Health “Burio Garofolo,” in Trieste, Italy.He has grown tired of pointing out and defending the proven benefits of breast milk for mothers and babies. “From a scientific point of view, carrying out research on the benefits of breastfeeding doesn’t make sense. Would anybody carry out research on the benefits of breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool?” says Cattaneo.”The burden of proof should fall on those who propose alternatives to breastfeeding,” Cattaneo says in an email interview with NPR. “Formula feeding lags far behind … breastfeeding in terms of safety and benefits. So we should never talk of the benefits of breastfeeding. We should talk about the harms of formula feeding.”Cattaneo argued in 2007 in an editorial in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health that research should center on effective methods to encourage and support women in breastfeeding. That was the goal of the resolution at the meeting of the World Health Assembly in Geneva in May.As for the belief that poor women who are themselves malnourished cannot adequately provide breast milk for their babies — that’s not true, says Cattaneo.”I’m very aware of the arguments from Trump,” says Perez-Escamilla of the president’s assertion that many poor women “need access to formula.””Many poor women are undernourished, and that spreads the notion that their milk is low quality and low quantity,” he says. “But their milk is still better than formula.”Cattaneo agrees. “When the formula industry says that mothers in low-income countries are too sick and malnourished to breastfeed, that is false. Breast milk is of excellent quality even if a mother is sick or malnourished. Quantity is also adequate, except in rare cases of terminal disease or very severe malnutrition.”There are few medical conditions and treatments that rule out breastfeeding, says Perez-Escamilla. Today, even women who are infected with HIV can follow the same recommendations for breastfeeding as uninfected women, provided they are on anti-retroviral therapy. “Women receiving some types of chemotherapy, or on some types of antidepressants or who are substance abusers should not breastfeed,” he says. “But overall, there are very, very few situations where she cannot breastfeed.”Nestle, along with Danone, Mead Johnson Nutrition and Abbott Laboratories, is one of the four leading corporations selling infant formula around the world.In 1977, Nestle’s formula practices made headlines when a boycott was announced in the U.S. in response to what breastfeeding advocates termed “aggressive marketing” of formula, especially in poor countries.Then and now, Nestle has defended its practices.In a statement emailed to NPR this week, Nestle said: “Nestlé strongly supports breastfeeding and has not wavered on this position. We have not, nor would we ever, lobby any governments — including the US government — to oppose breastfeeding policies anywhere in the world.”A study on industry practices by Save the Children finds that the top six formula manufacturers sometimes use marketing practices at odds with the code of marketing practices for infant formula drawn up by the World Health Assembly, the decision-making body of WHO. The International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes includes a call for no promotion of breast milk substitutes to the public, no gifts to mothers or health workers, no free samples to pregnant women or mothers and no sponsorship of meetings of health professionals. The report found cases of companies paying doctors to recommend their milk formulas and offering coupons, contests, gifts and other incentives to mothers to buy formula. The results are in line with earlier findings of ARCH, Assessment and Research on Child Health, an organization that investigates how foods for children are promoted. ARCH’s 2016 study of Tanzania, Cambodia, Nepal and Senegal found similar promotional activities by formula companies.”At the end of the day, it is the woman’s decision to decide how she wants to feed her baby,” says Perez-Escamilla. “It should be a truly informed choice on a level playing field. But that is impossible in low-income countries in an environment that is pushing them to formula feed.”Susan Brink is a freelance writer who covers health and medicine. She is the author of The Fourth Trimester, and co-author of A Change of Heart. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

first_imgA disabled campaigner has sent an 80-page dossier of evidence to the new first minister of Wales in a last-ditch bid to persuade him to abandon plans to close the Welsh government’s independent living grant scheme.Nathan Lee Davies has written to Mark Drakeford with just two months left until the planned closure of the Welsh Independent Living Grant (WILG), which was itself set up as an interim scheme following the UK government’s decision to close the Independent Living Fund in June 2015.Davies, who has led the Save WILG Campaign, told Drakeford in an open letter this week that closing WILG would leave disabled people with high support needs “at the mercy of cash-strapped Local Authorities who seem intent on cutting vital support packages across the board with no guarantee that further cuts will not follow”.He said that local authorities “seem to be treating disabled people as a burden”.Davies points out in the letter that Drakeford had promised – during his successful campaign to lead the Welsh Labour party last year – that if an independent evaluation of the WILG closure showed the new system “not working as well as the old one” then he would be “prepared to reverse it”.WILG was set up by the Welsh government – with UK government funding – as a short-term measure to support former ILF recipients when the fund was closed in June 2015.But the Welsh government is now closing WILG and transferring the funding to local councils, and by April the 22 local authorities will be solely responsible for meeting the support needs of all former ILF-recipients in Wales.Davies said the “deep dive review” of cases in which WILG recipients were having their support cut was “full of errors” and had failed to consult the disabled people who will be affected.He pointed to his own experience at the hands of his local authority, Wrexham council, which he said had treated him “abysmally”.Davies, who has a life-limiting condition, said that the process to reassess his support needs, due to end in September 2018, had still not been completed and was having “a negative impact” on both his physical and mental health.He described how his social worker had laughed when he suggested he needed 24-hour support and told him that no-one in the borough received that level of support.He said that the lack of overnight support in his current social care package meant he had to stop drinking at 8pm at night and get ready for bed at 10pm, and often had to call his 68-year-old father to assist him in the night, even though he lives a 10-minute drive away and has arthritis in both hands.The dossier, which has already been shared with the deputy health and social services minister Julie Morgan, includes a description of a day in his life, from last January, showing the poor level of support he already receives – even before the closure of WILG – and the pain and indignity this exposes him to, as well as the lack of choice and control in his life.Davies says: “It is 2018 and I am still being treated like a second class citizen. “I have a progressive condition of the nervous system which is accelerating at quite a rate, yet I still have the same amount of inadequate care and support hours that I did in 2010 when I first began independent living.”He updated this by posting a new blog yesterday, showing that little had changed in the last year.In the dossier, he warns the Welsh Labour party: “I do not want to spend the last days of my life completely unnecessarily fighting against the party I have defended and campaigned for across many years.“But I will if I have to. Please don’t make me.”The dossier also includes a letter from a director of Disability Wales, Trevor Palmer, in which he says the planned WILG closure has “created serious disruptions” to his life, with local authority “incompetence and lack of understanding” that has led to his support package being “substantially” reduced. A Welsh government spokesperson said: “We believe that disabled people’s ability to live independently should not be compromised by any changes to the way in which support is arranged for those people who previously received payments from the WILG.“The first minister has just received Mr Davies’ open letter regarding the WILG and will carefully consider the detailed points it makes.“He has asked the deputy minister for health and social services to consider what further action may be necessary to ensure disabled people in receipt of the WILG are not adversely affected by this change.  “The deputy minister has provided Mr Davies and the National Assembly’s petitions committee with details of the deep dive review.“She also met Mr Davies at his home to hear his concerns and discuss the issues raised in his dossier.”He said the deep dive review had seen the 22 Welsh local authorities audit all cases where they intended to cut the WILG element of people’s support.This found planned reductions in about 157 cases, and increases in support in a similar number, out of 1,174 people.He claimed that the cuts had taken place because “some people had developed a need for healthcare rather than social care while some, due to their support being provided in a different way or being of a different type, had a reduced need for care overall”.He accepted that two questionnaires, commissioned from the All Wales Forum of Parents and Carers of People with Learning Disabilities, had had a low response rate, but he said that responses to it “have been positive about the way assessments have been undertaken and the outcomes people have received”.Charlotte Walton, Wrexham council’s head of adult social care, said: “We cannot comment on any individual’s care and support needs. “However we do not accept the allegations being made. “We have carried out all of the WILG reviews in a person centred and inclusive manner and working with the individual recipients of the fund [has] enabled them to achieve positive outcomes from the reviews.”Davies said he would now push for a meeting with the first minister.He said: “I am not going anywhere and will continue to fight this until justice is served.”Picture: Nathan Lee Davies with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn A note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS…last_img read more

first_img Next Article Enroll Now for $5 This story originally appeared on Reuters 1 min read March 25, 2016 Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand –shares Add to Queuecenter_img Reuters Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Verizon Communications Inc. said an attacker had exploited a security vulnerability on its enterprise client portal to steal contact information of a number of customers.The company said the attacker however did not gain access to Customer Proprietary Network Information (CPNI) or other data.CPNI is the information that telephone companies collect including the time, date, duration and destination number of each call and the type of network a consumer subscribes to.  Krebs On Security, which first broke the news of the breach, said a member of a underground cybercrime forum had posted a new thread advertising the sale of a database containing the contact information on some 1.5 million customers of Verizon Enterprise.The seller priced the entire package at $100,000, but offered to sell it off in parts of 100,000 records for $10,000 apiece, Krebs added.The vulnerability, which was investigated and fixed, did not leak any data on consumer customers, Verizon said in a statement on Thursday.The company is currently notifying customers impacted by the breach.(Reporting by Amrutha Penumudi in Bengaluru; Editing by Diane Craft and Cynthia Osterman) Image credit: Foap | k_luang Verizon Hacked, With Data of 1.5 Million Customers Stolen Cyber Attackslast_img read more