first_imgREPRO DIGITAL/ CHAMPLAIN VALLEY PRINTING ACQUIRES NEW HASSELBLAD CAMERA SYSTEMWinooski, Vermont- Repro Digital/Champlain Valley Printing today announced the purchase of the new Hasselblad H3D II 31 megapixel medium format camera for its Photographic Studio located at 450 Weaver Street in Winooski, Vermont.John Goodman, with more than 30 years experience, has been the resident Photographer at Repro/Champlain Valley Printing for over 14 years and was one of the first digital Photographers in New England. “The large 31 megapixel CCD Sensor provides a sharper, cleaner, more accurate image than any other DSLR type camera” noted Goodman. He continued. “This all means less time and money spent doing color corrections and other post production cleanup. Skin tones appear natural and color gradients are smooth and noise free.” Goodman also stated that “the fully integrated Hasselblad system allows us to shoot in even the most challenging lighting environments like mixing available light with studio flash to make natural looking room settings.”Goodman believes that the new Hasselblad camera system, combined with his 30 years of experience, provides the best photography value in Vermont.Repro Digital/Champlain Valley Printing, in addition to their state-of-the-art Photography Studio, provides their customers turn-key services including pre-press, one-color to four-color digital and offset printing with binding and finishing servicesFor more information contact John Goodman (ext. 18) or Roger Moylan (ext. 27) at 802-655-2800 or visit the Repro Digital/ Champlain Valley Printing website at www.Reprografx.com(link is external)last_img read more

first_imgBerlin, VT – More than 100 Vermont non-profit organizations have received grants totaling $205,000 from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont (BCBSVT) in the first half of 2008, the states largest health insurer announced today.The funds are granted to improve health education and promote healthy lifestyles, and for direct services. BCBSVT executives cited the connection between improved health and lower health insurance rates as the incentive for its support and collaboration with community-based organizations receiving the grants. Individual grants typically range between $250 and $2,000.Partnering with like-minded organizations seeking to improve the health of our citizens benefits all of our customers and the state, explained William R. Milnes, Jr., president and CEO. Evidence clearly supports the value of these programs for improving health, and healthier Vermonters require fewer visits to the doctor, thereby helping to contain the cost of insurance premiums.In addition to direct grants, the insurer also administers the Vermont Caring Foundation, a non-profit foundation it created in 2005 to enhance the health and well being of Vermonts children. The Foundation granted nearly $14,000 in the first half of the year to four projects that promote physical activity and combat obesity.Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is the state’s oldest and largest private health insurer, providing coverage for about 180,000 Vermonters. It employs over 350 Vermonters at its headquarters in Berlin and branch office in Williston, and offers group and individual health plans to Vermonters. More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available on the Internet at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external). Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under a license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.last_img read more

first_imgThe Vermont Department of Education released 2009 school accountability determinations as required by the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLBA) today. The department determines whether schools meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). Those that do not meet AYP enter School Improvement.Results show:One school exited School Improvement.Seventy-seven schools, or 25 percent, are now in School Improvement.Thirty-one of those schools are now in Corrective Action.Eighty-eight schools, or 29 percent, did not make AYP this year.Twelve of those schools did not make AYP for the first time. “Schools are targeting instruction to ensure all students make adequate yearly progress,” said Commissioner Armando Vilaseca. “Challenges still remain, especially for students in poverty and English language learners. The department will continue to provide outreach to identified schools to ensure the needs of all our children are addressed.”A school makes Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) by meeting targets set by the state as required by NCLBA. These targets increase every three years with the goal of 100 percent proficiency by 2014. A school that does not make AYP for two consecutive years enters School Improvement, which requires schools to take specific actions designed to improve student achievement in the area(s) designated as not making AYP. A school that does not make AYP for four consecutive years enters Corrective Action, and the commissioner recommends to the State Board of Education actions specific to that school. If an identified school makes AYP two years in a row, it exits School Improvement.A school must make adequate yearly progress for all students, as well as for students in several sub-groups. AYP determinations are made for sub-groups of students by race, socio-economic status, English language learners and students with disabilities. Schools must have at least 40 students in a given sub-group in order for a decision to be made for that group.“Over 200 schools met all requirements of the state’s accountability system for 2009,” said Director of Standards and Assessment Gail Taylor. “Of the 36 schools on the school improvement list, Colchester Middle School exited school improvement, and Burke School met all of the requirements this year. If it meets all the requirements next year, it too will exit school improvement.”More than one-third of the remaining schools in School Improvement increased either the number of content areas or the number of student groups for which they met the accountability requirement. Of the 42 schools entering school improvement this year, 11 (more than one-fourth) made similar progress since last year. AYP determinations are based on the New England Common Assessment Program (NECAP) assessments and the Vermont Alternate Assessments given to Vermont public school students in grades three through eight and 11. The NECAP was given to students in grades three through eight and grade 11 in October 2008. This is the fourth year these exams have been given in the elementary and middle grades, and the second time they were given to students in grade 11.More information on school and district performance can be found on the department’s Web site at http://www.state.vt.us/educ/new/html/pgm_accountability.html#AYP(link is external).View the entire press release packet here: http://education.vermont.gov/new/pdfdoc/dept/press_releases/educ_ayp_pac…(link is external).###last_img read more

first_imgSource: BusinessWire – April, 21, 2009 Coughlin Stoia Geller Rudman & Robbins LLP, a leading plaintiffs’ firm based in San Diego, has announced the firm has secured a settlement of $50 million in cash for a class of TD Banknorth, Inc shareholders. Plaintiffs in a related action previously attempted to settle the case for under $3 million, or $.03 per TD Banknorth share. This victory for shareholders provides members of the class with an exponentially greater recovery than the related action was poised to provide before plaintiffs City of Dearborn Heights (MI) Act 345 Police & Fire Retirement System and H. Louis Farmer, Jr. successfully objected to that settlement and took over the case.The $50 million settlement, before fees and expenses, is more than 16 times the amount shareholders would have received under the previously proposed settlement. The Settlement Agreement was filed with the Court late yesterday and the settlement is subject to approval by the Court.”We always believed that TD Banknorth’s shareholders deserved more than mere pennies, and we’re pleased that we were able to obtain substantially more than the originally proposed settlement,” said John J. Riley II, the Treasurer of the City of Dearborn Heights.This class action was filed on behalf of former stockholders of TD Banknorth, arising out of the April 20, 2007 going-private merger in which Toronto-Dominion Bank, TD Banknorth’s majority stockholder, cashed out TD Banknorth’s public stockholders for $32.33 per share. The plaintiffs alleged that defendants breached their fiduciary duties to TD Banknorth’s shareholders because the terms of the going-private merger were unfair and the result of an unfair process.A number of plaintiffs filed complaints in Delaware and attempted to settle the case quickly. At the same time, Farmer filed an action in Maine state court and aggressively litigated the case. After obtaining strong evidence in support of his claims, Farmer, along with Dearborn Heights, took his case to Delaware and successfully objected to the settlement reached by the original Delaware plaintiffs. As the Court later summarized:While Farmer took extensive discovery in the Maine litigation, including nine depositions, the Original Plaintiffs did little to advance the litigation in Delaware, seemingly satisfied with negotiating a very modest settlement. Aware of these negotiations and concerned by what he saw as the Original Plaintiffs’ lack of diligence, Farmer stipulated to stay the Maine litigation and, with the other plaintiff currently seeking certification, the City of Dearborn Heights Act 345 Police & Fire Retirement System (“Retirement System”), filed a motion to intervene in the Delaware litigation. On March 23, 2007, two days after the filing of the motion to intervene, the Original Plaintiffs filed a stipulation of settlement, agreeing to the certification of the class and the appointment of the Original Plaintiffs as class representatives. The terms of the settlement also included certain corrective disclosures, and an increase of $.03 per share in the merger price…. Farmer and Retirement System filed their objection, amply supported by the extensive discovery taken in the Maine action, and, on July 19, this court rejected the settlement….”We firmly believed in the strength of our claims and were forging ahead towards trial prior to reaching a settlement with defendants. We consider this an exceptional result for our clients and the class,” said Coughlin Stoia partner Samuel H. Rudman.For more information, you can review the Settlement Agreement and exhibits thereto on the Coughlin Stoia web site (www.csgrr.com(link is external)) and at www.TDBanknorthShareholdersLitigation.com(link is external).last_img read more

first_imgAverage retail gasoline prices in Vermont moved just 0.8 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $2.86/gallon today. This compares with the national average that has increased 4.6 cents per gallon in the last week to $2.85/g, according to gasoline price website VermontGasPrices.com.Including the change in gas prices in Vermont during the past week, prices today are 86.1 cents per gallon higher than the same day one year ago and are 7.7 cents per gallon higher than a month ago. The national average has increased 11.8 cents per gallon during the last month and stands 83.4 cents per gallon higher than this day a year ago.About VermontGasPrices.comGasBuddy.com operates over 200 live gasoline price-tracking websites, including VermontGasPrices.com. GasBuddy.com was named one of Time magazine’s 50 best websites and to PC World’s 100 most useful websites of 2008. Source: VermontGasPrices.com Vermont, VT, April 5, 2010-last_img read more

first_imgThe 80 seventh- and eighth-grade students on the Navigator team at Edmunds Middle School in Burlington solve problems on one of four touchscreen SMART Boards in math class, measure and record temperature fluctuations with high tech probeware in science, participate in international Skype sessions in social studies via a large computer screen, and use their laptops to do Web-based writing assignment in language arts.What’s just as impressive as the team’s wall-to-wall technology, though, is the way teachers have incorporated it seamlessly into their lesson plans to powerfully engage students in their learning.Thanks to a $5 million gift to the University of Vermont from the Richard E. & Deborah L. Tarrant Foundation in 2009, many more Vermont middle school students will enjoy Navigator-style learning in the future. The gift, the largest in the foundation’s history, will be used to establish the Tarrant Institute for Innovative Education at UVM. The institute’s mission is to put programs like the one at Edmunds, called I-LEAP — the Learning and Engaging Adolescents Project — in place at middle schools around the state over the next 10 years.”Today’s young people are immersed in technology everywhere but in school,” said technology entrepreneur Richard Tarrant. “Instead of asking students to power down the moment the school day starts, we need to bring technology into the classroom where, combined with good teaching, it can be a powerful tool for engaging young minds.” Deborah Tarrant of the Richard E. and Deborah L. Tarrant Foundation shows the difference between the technologies students use inside and outside of school at a December 21, 2009, press conference. (Photo: Raj Chawla)”Our goal for the I-LEAP program,” said Deborah Tarrant, “is to help schools bridge to the 21st century with a strategy designed specifically to attract, engage, and inspire tech savvy youth in their classrooms.””This important gift from the Tarrant Foundation will greatly improve educational outcomes in Vermont,” said UVM president Daniel Mark Fogel. “We couldn’t be more grateful for the foundation’s generosity.”Roots in MiltonI-LEAP was developed at UVM five years ago with funding from the Tarrant Foundation in partnership with teachers and administrators at Milton Middle School, where the program was piloted and is now in its fourth academic year. The second I-LEAP site was launched at Edmunds in September.Focused on the middle school years, a crucial developmental period when success or failure can have lasting consequences, I-LEAP has two major components.Schools receive both a substantial suite of hardware and software and extensive professional development for teachers and administrators on how to teach effectively, employing best middle-school practices, in a tech-rich setting.The professional development component of I-LEAP consists of an intensive graduate course at UVM for teachers and administrators, and, of critical importance, frequent, in-school follow-up visits over a period of years by institute staff to support teachers in embedding student-centered, technology-rich strategies into curricula. A website with further resources is also under development.The I-LEAP program targets one team of students and teachers in a school, laying the groundwork for other teams to experience and embrace the model later. At Milton nearly all teachers have taken the professional development course, and the school has invested in 30 netbook computers for each of the other three teams at the middle school.More than a “technology drop”The emphasis I-LEAP places on professional development distinguishes it from what had been the norm in the past: “technology drops” that brought equipment to schools but gave teachers little support on how to use it.”I-LEAP is the polar opposite of that approach,” said Tarrant Institute director Penny Bishop, an associate professor in UVM’s College of Education and Social Services, who directs the university’s Middle Level Teacher Education Program. “The institute’s goal is to not only foster widespread use of technology in Vermont schools, but also to create a cadre of teachers who confidently employ it in service of what we know to be exemplary middle school teaching practices.”I-LEAP’s focus on professional development is timely: falling prices and growing federal, state and community support mean that more new technology is entering schools every year. Vermont will receive $5.6 million in federal funds for K-12 technology investment in the next three years.Podcasts and SMART Board competitionsStudent projects at both Milton and Edmunds demonstrate how technology can be used to foster what research shows are the best ways to engage middle school students, from personalizing learning to bringing real world problems into the classroom to promoting peer-to-peer exchanges.Students in a social studies class at Milton visited a senior center, for instance, then created podcasts featuring narration, interviews, and music that were posted on the Web. The Edmunds math class uses its four SMART Boards to get teams of students out of their seats competing with one another to solve math puzzles and problems.Evidence of successWhile it is too early to have statistically valid quantitative measures of the program’s effectiveness, qualitative evidence that the program is engaging students, including disaffiliated students who are most at risk, is abundant.According to surveys Bishop and her colleagues have conducted, students in I-LEAP say learning is more interesting, meaningful, and relevant to their lives compared with their earlier school experiences, an evaluation shared by many parents.”There’s a point to what we’re learning,” one Milton student said.”My daughter’s grades have improved since being involved in this program,” said an Edmunds parent. “She has always had a problem with focusing, but now with the laptop, I have seen her sit, focused, completing her work. I really see the advantages of bringing our teaching methods current with technology.”Students are also better able to express their own voice, they say.Teachers report having engaged, alert students in their classes who take more pride in their work and personal responsibility for it.Edmunds language arts teacher Kathy Gallagher said all students are now turning in their homework, compared with an average of about three-quarters in the past. Edmunds social studies teacher Brent Truchon reported a marked change in classroom participation. “For the first time in the history of my teaching career, every student’s hand was raised,” in a recent class, he said.Growing reachAs technology prices drop, and school districts share in technology costs, the institute should be able to focus more on professional development and spread its resources to more schools in the future.It will also look to partner with others to extend its reach. The Tarrant Foundation and UVM recently formed a consortium with the Vermont Principals Association and VITA-Learn, a statewide organization supporting technology in education, to deliver the I-LEAP professional development program to six schools throughout Vermont with $200,000 in funding from the Department of Education. Those schools will in turn train other teachers in their regions.”We want to reach as many Vermont middle school students as possible with this innovative program,” said Richard Tarrant. “We think it’s a game-changer.”Read more about why middle school is a crucial stage for intervention.Source: University of Vermont.last_img read more

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Vermont Economic Development Authority (VEDA) has approved $33.5 million in financing assistance to Vermont businesses undertaking commercial and manufacturing expansion projects throughout the state. Also included is financing to support agricultural, real estate development, and business technology projects.”VEDA is pleased to offer financing support to these projects,” said VEDA Chief Executive Officer Jo Bradley. ‘Jobs are being retained or created in a variety of economic sectors, and that is good news for Vermont.’ Projects approved by the Authority for financing assistance are:· Central Vermont Public Service Corporation, Rutland ‘A total of $30 million in Recovery Zone Facility Bond (RZFB) financing was given final approval by the Authority to support the $48.7 million in planned infrastructure upgrades by Central Vermont Public Service Corporation (CVPS). The low-interest, tax-exempt federal bond financing was made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (a.k.a. the Stimulus Act). In May of this year, VEDA gave inducement approval for $25 million in bond financing for the CVPS project; an additional $5 million in eligible project costs have been approved since then. Vermont’s largest utility, CVPS operates in 13 of the state’s counties and employs 530 people. Over the next two years, CVPS plans to install and upgrade distribution and transmission lines. Improvements and upgrades are also planned to distribution and transmission substations and hydro systems, telecommunication infrastructure and a Smart Grid investment is anticipated.· Swan Valley of Vermont and Jonergin Realty, LLC, Swanton ‘ A $5.6 million project to purchase a former cheese manufacturing facility and bring it back to productive use will receive $1.3 million in VEDA financing assistance. Through a newly-formed partnership between Jonergin Realty, LLC and Swan Valley of Vermont, LLC, the former VIA (Lucille Farms) cheese facility in Swanton will be purchased and upgraded with new equipment and machinery. Swan Valley of Vermont will gear up to produce a variety of specialty artisan cheeses for wholesale to various institutional buyers. It is estimated that within three years of the project, more than 50 new jobs will be created. Bank of America is also participating in the project.  · Rock Art Brewery, Inc., Morrisville ‘ Financing was approved to help Rock Art Brewery buy land and build a new brewing facility, more than doubling their current leased production and retail space in Morrisville. The project also includes financing participation by Merchants Bank. The brewing company, started as a home business in 1997, will move from their current leased facility to property which they will purchase on Route 100. The company will build a new structure and purchase machinery and equipment to be used in the brewing process. Rock Art Brewery employs eight people, a number expected to grow to ten within three years of the expansion project.  · Mad River Park Corporation, Waitsfield ‘ Financing of $210,000 was approved to Mad River Park Corporation to fund its purchase of a 14,000 square foot industrial building on 3.47 acres of land in Waitsfield.    In addition, VEDA approved:· $1.05 million in financing to Vermont farmers through the Authority’s agricultural loan program, the Vermont Agricultural Credit Corporation (VACC);· $100,000 in financing through the Authority’s Technology Loan Program, designed to assist smaller technology-related firms; and· $350,000 in small business project financing through the Authority’s Small Business Loan Program. VEDA’s mission is to promote economic prosperity in Vermont by providing financial assistance to eligible businesses, including manufacturing, agricultural, and travel and tourism enterprises. Since its inception in 1974, VEDA has made financing commitments totaling over $1.5 billion. For more information about VEDA, visit www.veda.org(link is external) or call 802-828-5627.Source: VEDA. 9.22.2010last_img read more

first_imgMylan Technologies Inc,Mylan Inc (Nasdaq: MYL) today confirmed that the company has been sued by Vivelle Ventures LLC, Noven Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation in connection with the filing of an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Estradiol Transdermal System, USP (Twice-Weekly), 0.025 mg/day, 0.0375 mg/day, 0.05 mg/day, 0.075 mg/day and 0.1 mg/day. This product is the generic version of Vivelle-Dot®, which is indicated for the treatment of symptoms associated with menopause, the treatment of hypoestrogenism and the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Mylan has a plant in St Albans which manufactures Transdermal patches and pharmaceutical labels.Mylan believes it is the first company to have filed a substantially complete ANDA containing a Paragraph IV certification for all strengths and expects to qualify for 180 days of marketing exclusivity upon final FDA approval. The plaintiffs filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont.Vivelle-Dot had U.S. sales of approximately $215 million for the 12 months ending Dec. 31, 2010, according to IMS Health. Currently, Mylan has 169 ANDAs pending FDA approval representing $97.9 billion in annual sales, according to IMS Health. Forty-seven of these pending ANDAs are potential first-to-file opportunities, representing $24.8 billion in annual brand sales, for the 12 months ending June 30, 2010, according to IMS Health.This press release includes statements that constitute “forward-looking statements,” including with regard to the expected first-to-file status and pending litigation. These statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Because such statements inherently involve risks and uncertainties, actual future results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to: the use of legal, regulatory and legislative strategies by competitors or other third parties to delay or prevent product introductions; risks inherent in legal and regulatory processes; and the other risks detailed in the company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The company undertakes no obligation to update these statements for revisions or changes after the date of this release.Mylan Inc. ranks among the leading generic and specialty pharmaceutical companies in the world and provides products to customers in more than 150 countries and territories. The company maintains one of the industry’s broadest and highest quality product portfolios supported by a robust product pipeline; operates one of the world’s largest active pharmaceutical ingredient manufacturers; and runs a specialty business focused on respiratory, allergy and psychiatric therapies. For more information about Mylan, please visit www.mylan.com(link is external). For more information about generic drugs, please visitwww.ChoosingGenerics.com(link is external).SOURCE Mylan Inc. PITTSBURGH, March 1, 2011 /PRNewswire/last_img read more

first_imgVermont Technical College,Dr Philip A Conroy, Jr this week will begin his tenure as President of Vermont Technical College. He was appointed by the Vermont State College’s Board of Trustees earlier this year following a nationwide presidential search. Conroy comes to Vermont Tech from Mount Ida College in Newton, Massachusetts, where he served as vice president of enrollment management and marketing.But while he and his wife, Dr Jan Conroy, have yet to move into the president’s house, Conroy is no stranger to Vermont Tech. Following his appointment December 9th, he quickly formed a 20-plus member presidential transition team representing all areas of the college with which he’s been working to identify the college’s needs and priorities, as well as establish new directions the college will take under his guidance and leadership.Traditionally a two-year technical school offering a handful of baccalaureate degrees, Conroy’s long-term vision is to transform Vermont Tech into a ‘destination’ school offering primarily bachelor’s and, in time, even a few master’s degrees.‘I am intrigued by the vast potential Vermont Tech has to evolve into an ‘applied university’,” he said. ‘Through partnerships statewide with businesses, community leaders, and other institutions, I see the college evolving from its roots as an associate degree institution to a recognized and well-respected bachelor’s degree institution serving both Vermont and the greater New England region. I believe there are some exciting and intriguing times ahead for Vermont Tech.’Conroy, who has served in a variety of roles at Mount Ida since 1997, is an internationally recognized expert on higher education management, particularly in the areas of strategic enrollment management and institutional advancement ‘ specialties that will serve him well given Vermont’s current economic climate and plummeting high school enrollments.‘The challenges posed by the declining numbers of high school students graduating from northern New England high schools are many,’ Conroy said, ‘as are the financial realities of operating a public college in a state with limited financial resources. As I look ahead, however, I see Vermont Tech becoming an example of how strong an institution can be with a profound commitment to its public mission despite limited public funding.’Among Conroy’s first priorities will be rebuilding the college’s alumni and development offices and improving the quality of on-campus student life. He will also be working with his transition team to plan a statewide event this fall, where he will begin reaching out to business and community leaders to discuss the potential roles Vermont Tech could play in helping to build, support, and assist the state on a number of levels.‘Clearly we have our work cut out for us,’ Conroy said. ‘But the pieces are in place. We have the people, programs, and expertise to get it done. Now starts the difficult but extremely rewarding process of raising the college’s profile and enhancing its reputation throughout Vermont and across the region.’last_img read more

first_imgSpeaker Shap Smith today announced the appointment of Representative Michael Fisher as the chair of the House Committee on Health Care.  Fisher, the current vice chair of the committee, replaces former Representative Mark Larson who resigned from the legislature in August to become the Commissioner of the Department of Vermont Health Access. Representative Sarah Copeland-Hanzas will become the committee’s vice chair. ‘Mike has been a leader in the House for over a decade.  His expertise in the field of health and human services is vast, and his enthusiasm to tackle the barriers to the access of quality affordable health care for Vermonters is unparalleled,’ said Speaker Smith.  ‘The legislature made great strides last year and Mike’s leadership was crucial to those efforts.  His leadership will be needed as we continue to move forward with health care reform.’ Rep. Fisher has been a member of the legislature since 2001, representing the towns of Bristol, Lincoln, Monkton and Starksboro. He served as the vice chair of the House Committee on Human Services from 2007-2010 and as vice chair of the House Committee on Health Care during the 2011 session.  Rep. Fisher works as a social worker in Addison County, having earned a masters degree in social work from the University of Vermont. ‘I am excited to continue to advance our state’s health care reform efforts,’ said Rep. Fisher.  ‘Reducing health care costs and improving access to quality care is vital to the health and economic wellbeing of the state, and I am confident in the ability of the committee to dig into that work.’ Rep. Copeland-Hanzas has represented the towns of Bradford, Fairlee, and West Fairlee since 2005.  She has been a member of the House Committee on Health Care for the past five years, and has served as Deputy Assistant Majority Leader since 2009.  Rep. Copeland-Hanzas is a small business owner, operating The Local Buzz Cafe in Bradford. ‘The House Health Care Committee has led the way in health care reform over the past two years,’ said Speaker Smith. ‘I am confident that Mike and Sarah will be a strong leadership team and look forward to seeing the progress of the committee.’last_img read more