first_img(PhysOrg.com) — “It’s pretty clear that the standard model of physics is not enough to explain all the phenomena in nature,” Tomasz Skwarnicki tells PhysOrg.com. “Through looking at a variety of phenomena – one of them being dark matter – we know that there is a whole set of interactions beyond our standard model.” Skwarnicki’s work doesn’t deal with dark matter, but the Syracuse University physicist has been working on models of physics that go beyond the standard. Like many other scientists, Skwarnicki is interested in the Higgs boson. This is an elementary particle that, according to theory, gives mass to other particles. The Higgs boson is the only particle in the standard model that has yet to be discovered in a physical and experimental sense. Skwarnicki has been associated with the CLEO Collaboration, a group of scientists from a variety of physics programs in the U.S., Britain and Canada. CLEO is based at Cornell University, in Ithaca, New York, and experiments are done at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR).Data from CLEO experiments have been analyzed on an ongoing basis, and a recent article published by the collaboration in Physical Review Letters offers some insight regarding the probability of one of the super symmetric extensions to the standard model. The article is called “Search for Very Light CP-Odd Higgs Boson in Radiative Decays of Y(1S)”, and Skwarnicki points out that it offers new constraints on parameters of Next to Minimal Super Symmetric Model (NMSSM).“Our measures restricted the range of new physics models,” Skwarnicki explains. “We closed some gaps in measurements that had existed before.”Skwarnicki says that while the standard model of physics allows for only one Higgs boson, designated CP-even, the NMSSM suggest seven total Higgs bosons, including a CP-odd boson. “The presence of this CP-odd boson would change all knowledge of all Higgs decays,” he explains. “But to make it work, this CP-odd Higgs boson would need to be very light.” The data analysis done involved looking for evidence of production and decay of this very light Higgs boson. The CLEO team looked for a decay of what is called an Upsilon state, Y(1S), which would produce a CP-odd boson, which would in turn decay to a pair of heavy electron-like particles . “Unfortunately,” Skwarnicki points out, “we did not find this. So the search for experimental evidence of the Higgs boson continues.” He did say that the new bounds established by the experiment, setting a new upper limit, do have an effect on scientific theory. “Our data analysis shows that it would be very hard to speculate with a light Higgs in the Next to Minimal Super Symmetric model. We cannot rule out this model completely, but we ruled out a great deal. Chances are that another theory will have to be used. And the bounds can be used in future ideas of what new interactions beyond the standard model are possible.”Skwarnicki is fairly optimistic that evidence for the existence (or non-existence) of the Higgs boson will be found soon. “The whole point of the Large Hadron Collider, though other experiments will be performed, is basically to create the energy needed to find the Higgs boson,” he points out. “The LHC should be fully operational next year, and then we’ll have a better idea of whether we need to throw everything out the window.”Skwarnicki himself is lined up for an experiment at the LHC. “Non-standard models, which are needed to explain some phenomena, will also be affected by this. What we find out about the Higgs boson in Geneva will apply to non-standard models as well.”Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: In search of a light Higgs boson (2008, October 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-10-higgs-boson.html Explore furthercenter_img ATLAS Experiment adds more pieces to the Higgs boson puzzle This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_img Explore further The vehicle will collect garbage from 25 newly installed split bins and take it to the Energy from Waste power station and recycling center nearby. The power station burns the garbage to generate electricity, and the truck recharges at a charging post to be ready for the next day’s route. The garbage truck is a modified Smith Edison 3.5-ton Ford Transit with a 40 kWh lithium-ion battery pack. The vehicle has a top speed of 50 mph, a 100-mile range, and takes about six to eight hours to charge. The only reported downside is that the quiet electric truck may present safety issues for unsuspecting pedestrians.Besides powering the garbage truck, the Energy from Waste station also pumps about 10 megawatts of electricity into the grid per day. All the power is generated from burning local garbage. ___________via: Register Hardware (PhysOrg.com) — A town in Britain has recently demonstrated its new “‘leccy vehicle” – an electric garbage truck that is fueled by the garbage it collects. The Kirklees Council presented the waste-powered Ford Transit garbage truck at Huddersfield town center last week. Citation: British Town Demonstrates World’s First Garbage Truck Powered by Garbage (2009, February 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-02-british-town-world-garbage-truck.html The electric garbage truck and charging post. The vehicle runs on electricity produced from the garbage it collects, after being recycled at the nearby Energy from Waste power station. Image: Register Hardware. Learning from a circular economy pioneer This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

first_img Male wolf spiders cannibalize females Citation: Study finds cannibalism helps some spiders produce more offspring (2012, August 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-cannibalism-spiders-offspring.html Photo of Agelenopsis pennsylvanica in funnel web. Image: University of Michigan. More information: Sexual cannibalism is associated with female behavioural type, hunger state and increased hatching success, Animal Behaviour, In Press, www.sciencedirect.com/science/ … ii/S0003347212002916AbstractPrecopulatory sexual cannibalism may represent the most extreme form of sexual conflict because it necessarily truncates the reproductive potential of the victim. Three of the most prominent mechanisms invoked to explain incidence of precopulatory sexual cannibalism are the ‘adaptive foraging’, ‘aggressive spillover’ and ‘mate choice’ hypotheses. These hypotheses argue that sexual cannibalism is either (1) the result of female choice, where females gauge the benefits of suitors as perspective mates versus prey, (2) a neutral (or deleterious) by-product of selection on aggressiveness in nonreproductive contexts, or (3) a mechanism by which females express their mating preferences, respectively. We tested the predictions of these hypotheses in the funnel-web spider Agelenopsis pennsylvanica using staged laboratory encounters. We then tracked numerous fitness proxies of cannibalistic versus noncannibalistic females to determine whether cannibalism was associated with increased female performance. We found that more aggressive females and those deprived of food were more likely to engage in precopulatory cannibalism. Cannibalism was not associated with male condition, male body size or female body size, nor with the mass of females’ egg cases, the number of eggs therein, or the mass of individual eggs. In contrast, there was a positive association between the mass of the egg case and the number of offspring that emerged in cannibalistic females, but not in noncannibalistic females. Thus, offspring of cannibalistic mothers appear to have increased hatching success in heavier egg cases. This may represent a novel advantage associated with sexual cannibalism.via BBC Explore further © 2012 Phys.org , Animal Behaviour This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The researchers, led by Aric Berning, set out to learn more about why the common female funnel grass spider quite often eats male spiders that come near, prior to copulation, which would seem counterproductive, unless it’s seen as a sign of discrimination, i.e. they only eat the ones they don’t want to have as a mate. To learn more they captured a bunch of the spiders and brought them back to the lab. The females were allowed to build webs, and then males were subsequently dumped into them to see what would happen under different circumstances. They found that the females were likely to eat any male that arrived if they were hungry, or just feeling particularly aggressive. In other scenarios, they found the females a little more discerning, allowing some to mate with them, while eating others. In some extreme cases they found some females that refused to eat any males at all, and some that ate every male no matter what else was going on.But they found something else too. In instances where the females dined on a male or two before eventually copulating and producing young, the egg cases they produced tended to be a little more robust than usual and inside of them, were more young than were found in egg cases produced from females that had not eaten males prior to producing the cases and offspring. So it seems that eating a few suitors before giving birth appears to give the females some added vigor in producing and protecting offspring, something that has never been observed in any species before.The researchers don’t know why things work out this way, but speculate that eating males might offer the perfect combination of vitamins and minerals for assisting with case production, or perhaps it prompts a hormonal response. Either way, it appears that the relationship between male and female funnel web spiders is much more complex than it might appear at first glance. (Phys.org) — Researchers have known for years that many female spiders kill their mates, either before or after mating and some even eat them, and while many theories have arisen as to why this occurs, this newest instance appears to be the most bizarre yet. A team of biologists from the University of Pittsburgh have found, as they describe in their paper published in the journal Animal Behavior, that females of one species of spider that eat males, tend to produce thicker egg cases out of which emerge more hatchlings, than those that don’t. Journal information: Animal Behaviorlast_img read more

first_imgIn the prokaryotic respiratory chain, the situation is more complicated. A complete pathway of electron flow has not yet been determined in the cell type due to its complexity. It is therefore necessary to understand the complete structure of a “supercomplex” involved during bacterial electron transfer to assist the goal. In the study, the researchers extracted and purified the complex from M. smegmatis to visualize the architecture using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) at a resolution of 3.5 Å. The structure provided crucial insights into the mechanism of direct electron transfer within a respiratory supercomplex. The dimensions of the supercomplex were in the range of 200 x 70 x 120 Å, in a symmetrized linear architecture completely different from previously reported respiratory supercomplexes. By composition, the linear dimeric CIV1-CIII2-CIV1 was arranged such that individual CIVs flanked the central CIII dimer on either side. The information revealed a direct link between enzymes during electron transfer, representing a new mode of respiratory chain catalysis. The detailed structural findings have potential to assist with antimycobacterial drug discovery efforts. The architecture of the supercomplex in its entirety: The cartoon representation shows the menaquinone/menaquinol (MK) in bright green colored solid spheres and phospholipids as yellow sticks. Credit: Science, doi: 10.1126/science.aat8923 The authors revealed the cryo-EM structure of a CIII-CIV respiratory supercomplex of the M. smegmatis bacteria. The intra-complex electron transfer pathway ranged from quinol oxidation in CIII to oxygen reduction in CIV. The results showed a new mechanism for bifurcating electron transfer to ensure completion of the Q cycle (the net movement of protons across a lipid bilayer) for energy transduction. The association of a superoxide dismutase in the architecture of the system can protect against oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The architecture of quinone binding sites also provided a framework for future studies in structure-based antimicrobial drug discovery. Study shows how bacteria guide electron flow for efficient energy generation In a recent study conducted by Hongri Gong and colleagues, a respiratory supercomplex was isolated from the bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis, and its structure was visualized at a resolution of 3.5 Å using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). The bacterium is a close relative to M. tuberculosis and a popular model used to study many other bacterial species. The detailed structure revealed how electrons were transferred in the cell in a process hitherto unseen. Respiration in Actinomycetes and overall architecture of the Mycobacterial respiratory machine CIII2CIV2SOD2. A) The respiratory electron transfer chain in Actinomycetes (left) and the 5 major prokaryotic cytochrome c pathway variants with the organization schemes in representative organisms (right). The M. smegmas cytochrome c pathway has its cytochrome c fused with complex III to form a bcc-type complex III that interacts with the aa3-type complex IV to assemble into a CIII-CIV supercomplex. MK = menaquinone/menaquinol. B) The entire architecture of the bcc-aa3 type respiratory CIII-CIV Supercomplex from M. smegmatis. The cryo-EM map of the supercomplex shows a linear 2-fold dimerized form of CIV1-CIII2-CIV1 with dimensions 200 x 70 x 120 Å. CIII is seen in orange, CIV is magenta and the association factors PRSAF1 in green, LpqE in blue and SOD in grey. C) Cartoon representation of the side view of the supercomplex (top) and a cross-sectional view (bottom). The MK is presented as bright green solid spheres and phospholipid as yellow sticks. In the cross-sectional view at the bottom, the boundaries of CIII, CIV and association factor PRSAF1 are depicted in dashed lines in color (orange for CIII, magenta for CIV and green for PRSAF1). Credit: Science, doi: 10.1126/science.aat8923. More information: Hongri Gong et al. An electron transfer path connects subunits of a mycobacterial respiratory supercomplex, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aat8923Eric F. Pettersen et al. UCSF Chimera?A visualization system for exploratory research and analysis, Journal of Computational Chemistry (2004). DOI: 10.1002/jcc.20084 During cryo-EM analysis, the researchers used uranyl acetate (1 percent w/v) for negative staining, using 5 µl of the supercomplex sample at a concentration of 0.05 mg/ml, images were taken on a FEI Tecnai Spirit microscope operating at 120 kV for initial model building. The acquired images were processed using a low-resolution reconstruction of the supercomplex from 53 micrographs of the negative stained sample. For complete reconstruction of the supercomplex, the authors manually selected 7,600 micrographs from 8,200 original micrographs during cryo-EM image processing. All figures in the study were created using PyMOL or UCSF chimera. The composition and structure of CIV. Cartoon representation of the complex IV. The phospholipids are shown as yellow sticks. Credit: Science, doi: 10.1126/science.aat8923 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 Science X Network Typically, chemical energy to synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and power cellular reactions is extracted during cellular respiration by coupling the oxidation of an energy source (sugars, fatty acids and amino acids) and the reduction of an electron acceptor (oxygen, sulfur, nitrate and sulfate). In aerobic cellular respiration, energy is extracted from electron donors to the terminal acceptor, oxygen, via the electron transport chain (ETC) to create a transmembrane proton gradient known as a proton motive force (PMF) that drives ATP synthesis. The new results now published in Science reveal a direct link for electron transfer between enzymes to represent a new mode of respiratory chain catalysis. Quinones and cytochromes are two types of electron carriers in ETCs used to shuttle electrons to and from large macromolecular structures embedded in the membrane. Four membrane oxidoreductases are involved in the mitochondrial respiratory chain for electron transfer. These include complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, CI), complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, CII), complex III (bc1-type ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase, bc1-type CIII) and complex IV (aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase, aa3-type CIV). By function, CIII can oxidize ubiquinol to ubiquinone and pass the electrons to soluble cytochrome c. Electrons are then shuttled to CIV, where oxygen is reduced to water. The transmembrane PMF is generated by proton pumping in CI, CIII and CIV. The composition and structure of CIII dimer. The menaquinone/menaquinol is presented as bright green solid spheres and the phospholipids are yellow sticks. Credit: Science, doi: 10.1126/science.aat8923 Journal information: Science During bacterial cell culture experiments, the authors used an M. tuberculosis-like hydrogen peroxide-resistant M. smegmatis mutant strain. The cells were cultured and the membrane isolated as previously described. After cell culture, harvesting and cell lysis, cell membrane pellets were harvested to extract respiratory supercomplexes. The supercomplexes were characterized using optical spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy and 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining. To identify heme groups, selected fractions were analyzed by recording spectra before and after reduction with dithionate as described previously. The purified samples were analyzed using native mass spectroscopy to investigate the architecture and the individual structural components were analyzed using previously established protocols. Citation: Ready for its close-up—a bacterium’s electron transport pathway (2018, November 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-ready-close-upa-bacterium-electron-pathway.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

first_imgTwo-and-a-half years after he met with a crippling road accident that cut short his career, veteran Malayalam film actor Jagathy Sreekuamar was awarded Rs 5.90 crore by a private insurance company as compensation. The documents regarding the award of compensation was handed over to the wheelchair-bound actor at his residence here by top officials of the insurance company. The actor and his family members had earlier clinched an agreement with the insurance company at an Adalat conducted by the District Legal Services Authority. Jagathy met with a major road accident while travelling in a car at Thenhippalam near Kozhikode in March 2012, when he was on his way to a shooting location at Kodagu in Karnataka. This followed prolonged treatment in hospitals.last_img

first_imgUrban reflections, is a collection of realistic and surreal images of Bombay (Mumbai, India), as seen by me, over the last seven years. These images capture the rapidly changing life in Mumbai, which has adopted the path of vertical growth during the last decade.The exhibition being held on March 13 to 23 at Arpana Caur Gallery at Academy of Fine Arts and Literature, Sri Fort Institutional Area, marks a significant departure in the professional career of well-known photojournalist Chandu Mhatre. After shooting all major news events unfolding in India in the past four decades, he has lately been focusing on what can be characterized as fine art photography.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Although the pictures that form Urban Reflections are primarily motivated by artistic considerations, they also tell the urban story of Mumbai’s soul. Urban Reflections is a result of Mhatre’s many journeys through Mumbai to chronicle how the city has changed under the impact of globalization and economic liberalization. The aim has been to capture the city far from its stereotypical images and give the city a touch of fine art photography.This ‘makeover’ in the name of ‘development’ is changing the city’s skyline rapidly; in their quest for materialism, people are uprooted from their cultural moorings thereby resulting in urban chaos. Sea links, highways and flyovers inundated with vehicles have added to the frantic pace of life. The resulting images are seen reflected, on mirrored walls, windows and doors. Contemporary life in Mumbai is a vibrant kaleidoscope of colours and images. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe continuous flow of migrants to Mumbai makes it a melting pot of cultures and traditions. People from all levels of society come with hope, intellectual inputs, traditional values, religious beliefs and cultural nuances. They provide manpower needed to keep the city running. This in turn has an impact on urban life, creating opportunities as well as tensions due to conflicts of interest, beliefs, values and their survival instinct.Based in New Delhi and Mumbai, India, Mhatre has worked for a wide variety of international media groups and global organizations.  Apart from all the leading publications, leading international and Indian magazines and newspapers as well as a variety of global organizations has published his works.  Chandu’s pictures have been extensively used by UNICEF, UNDP, United Press International, Associated Press, Reuters News Agency, Fortune, Forbes, Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, Washington Post, Geo, The Times London, The Independent, The Guardian, The Telegraph, Marg Publications, CBS 60 Minutes, Debonair, India Today, Bombay Magazine, The Illustrated Weekly of India, Onlooker, Mirror, Imprint, The Times of India and The Indian Express.Additionally, Chandu documented Portuguese history in Goa for the Institute of Cultural affairs in Macau, Government of Portugal. He photographed a book on The Warli for Lalit Kala Akadami. He has also researched and worked with CBS 60 Minutes for their program in India, 50 years of IIT, AIDS, Medical Tourism, Most beautiful woman in world, Aishwarya Rai and Bikram Yoga. He photo documented 1st Jazz Yatra, which was organized by The Bombay group in Mumbai in 1978.He also specializes in fine art photography and archive exhibition photo printing for which he has set up his own printing unit. At present he is working on photo features and projects in India on human, social and environmental issues.When: March 13 to 23Where: Arpana Caur Gallery at Academy of Fine Arts and Literature, 4/6 Sri Fort Institutional Arealast_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Press Club Kolkata today condemned the brutal killing of renowned journalist Shujaat Bukhari, who was shot dead by unidentified gunmen outside his office at Lal Chawk in Srinagar yesterday. Joining the media fraternity across the country in protesting against the killing of Bukhari, club President Snehasis Sur and Secretary Kingshuk Pramanik in a joint statement demanded immediate arrest of the killers. Bukhari was shot at while disembarking from his car near the ‘Rising Kashmir’ newspaper office yesterday. Bukhari, apart from being the editor-in-chief of Rising Kashmir, was a veteran journalist and contributed to various newspapers and magazines across the country. His independent views were highly visible in social media also. Bukhari was respected as a courageous journalist propagating his independent views from the disturbed areas of the valley.last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Members of the Matua community staged demonstrations at different parts of the state, protesting against the exclusion of the names of 40 lakh Bengalis in the final draft of Assam’s National Register of Citizens (NRC).It may be mentioned that Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee had stated that with exclusion of their names, the people have turned refugees in their own country and it is the outcome of BJP’s “vote politics”.Stating that the “people are being isolated”, the Chief Minister had said: “BJP’s divide and rule policy to isolate people has led to the situation.” Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe Chief Minister, who is in Delhi at present, criticised the government at the Centre over Assam’s NRC issue.The protest started at around 8 am and continued till noon. People from the community carried out agitation mainly in North 24-Parganas and Nadia districts. They also put up a symbolic railway blockade at Panihati Railway Station.With the protest, there was a disruption in train services since morning at different stations of Sealdah Division. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThere were obstructions at various stations of the Sealdah-Ranaghat Main Line, Sealdah-Bangaon, Sealdah-Dankuni and Barasat Hansnabad sections.There were obstructions at Sandalia, New Barrackpore, Gobardanga, Dum Dum, Belghoria, Ichhapur, Kanchrapara, Chakdaha, Halisahar, Bira, Naihati, Titagarh, Palta, Baranagar, Sodepur, Dankuni, Machlandapur, Habra, Ashoknagar, Duttapukur, Bamangachi, Barrackpore, Badkulla,Bongaon, Ranaghat, Akaipur, and Thakurnagar. The train services resumed at around 12 noon. There was cancellation of 51 local trains of Sealdah Division.People from the Matua community also protested against the move by putting up a roadblock at Bagnan in Howrah on National Highway 6, demanding immediate steps so that people do not turn refugees in their own country.There were long queues of vehicles on the national highway. It took some time to normalise the traffic movement after the demonstration was withdrawn.Commuters were greatly inconvenienced as train services in the main section were badly hit. The demonstration was lifted and train services became normal from noon.last_img read more

first_imgIt was an opportunity for theatre enthusiasts to learn and gain hands-on experience from the masters of theatre when the 18th Bharat Rang Mahotsav’s “Master Class” witnessed the presence of legendary theatre personality Joy Michael on Friday in the national Capital. The session was moderated by Sumit Tandon.The famous director has been associated with theatre for decades and holds a big contribution in establishment of one of the oldest theatre group “Yatrik” in 1964.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The session also held the association of Yatrik’s very first members: Sushma Seth, Salima Raza and Kusum Haider. Struggling with the ailing health, Joy Michael spoke few, but very valuable words of wisdom to audience. “It is a great pleasure to be here. I love working with young people. It is always a pleasure to watch them succeed and come back to share with us.” Sharing their memories regarding the conception of their reparatory group, veteran actor Sushma Seth mentioned: “We were a group of passionate young people who just wanted to perform theatre. We did not have any resources but Joy always kept her home open for rehearsals.”   Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“To make children learn something, theatre is the best medium. It is the most apt medium of understanding something,” she added. Providing a vote of thanks to the eminent guests and Joy Michael on behalf of National School of Drama, Director Prof Waman Kendre said: “It is impossible to thank Joy Michael for her work in theatre. I think that National School of Drama would prefer to be at her loan forever.”last_img read more

first_imgIf you think playfulness is associated only with childhood, you may be wrong.A new study suggests that playfulness in adults is a positive trait which may help them to see things from new perspectives, turn monotonous tasks into something interesting as well as help them when choosing partners and in romantic relationships.The study showed that playful people are able to reinterpret situations in their lives so that they experience them as entertaining or are able to reduce stress levels. People who describe themselves as playful are also viewed by others as such. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfPlayfulness should not be equated with humour. Instead we need a new vocabulary to describe it, said Rene Proyer from Martin Luther University (MLU) in Halle-Wittenberg, Germany.“Playfulness is an independent personality trait that shares certain aspects with five global dimensions – including extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, openness to experience and emotional stability that are frequently used to describe personality – but which cannot be interchanged,” Proyer explained. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIn the study, the researchers identified four basic types of playful adults.“There are people who like to fool around with friends and acquaintances. We describe this as other-directed playfulness. By contrast, light-heartedly playful people regard their whole life as a type of game,” Proyer said.Another category includes people who like to play with thoughts and ideas – this describes intellectual playfulness. These people are able to turn monotonous tasks into something interesting.The psychologist describes the final group as being whimsically playful. “These people tend to be interested in strange and unusual things and are amused by small day-to-day observations.”Conversely, playfulness in adults has also been associated with negative connotations. Playful people are sometimes not taken seriously or are seen as unreliable, as they may easily change perspectives.last_img read more