first_imgWestern Bureau:A second-year medical student from Kenya and a Jamaica public service employee took top honours in the second running of the Black River 5K Run/Walk race on Sunday.Edgar Muganzi strolled away with the top male award after crossing the finish line in 18 minutes 30.18 seconds, while the top female prize went to Juliet Reeves, who stopped the clock in a respectable 27:49.26.Muganzi said after his race that he was delighted to have finished first in his inaugural attempt.”This was a beautiful course. I had no problems with it, and I am very happy to win here,” he said.”I am just so happy to perform and add my part in raising funds for the treatment of cancer,” Muganzi added.Eighty-seven runners and walkers took part in the event, an almost 50 per cent increase in registration over last year, and a pleased David Morris, president of the Black River chapter of the St Elizabeth Chamber of Commerce, stated as much.”I am of the impression that this was a great event, but we put in a real effort to get the word out, and it’s definitely much improved from last year. It’s a growing event that we are proud to be part of,” Morris said.Part proceeds from the event will go towards assisting the Black River branch of the Jamaica Cancer Society.Muganzi was chased across the line by Marcell Stewart in 18:57.65, while Anthony Danvern was third.In the women’s section, first-time entrant Reeves of Savanna-la-Mar, Westmoreland, won ahead of Elinor Daniel, 28:15.04, and Kadian Myers, 36:08.08.Carl Barrett took care of business in the men’s walk, posting 37:16.39. Jon Pierre Cavannah was second with Anthony Graham in third.Cecile Barrett was the female walk winner, with Marsha Alexander taking second, just in front of Janette Kaloo.last_img read more

first_img CRISP SCORING FORM WESTERN BUREAU: After defeating Montego Bay United FC 3-1 in Monday night’s Red Stripe Premier League fixture at the Montego Bay Sports Complex, Portmore United’s head coach, Jeffrey Hewitt, believes his team’s 3-1 victory proved they can adapt and still remain razor sharp. Hewitt employed a counter-attacking style in the second half as MBU had them pinned inside their half for the majority of the second half of a thrilling match, to come away with a result that put them back atop the standings with only three regular season games left in the schedule. “We knew how this Montego Bay team plays and we wanted to catch them on the break, which we did twice, as we can play counter-attacking football too, and we demonstrated that and got three goals for it,” said Hewitt. He said his core of players can play from the bench as well as from the start and whenever summoned they are ready to perform, which oftentimes ends in a good result for the team. Hewitt’s three second-half substitutes played key roles in Monday night’s victory, but Hewitt said they remain focused on the upcoming games and the semi-finals. Ricardo Morris fired Portmore into a fifth-minute lead, which they held way into the second half when substitute Mark Alves doubled the score in the 72nd minute. Tramaine Stewart made the game safe for Portmore when he scored in the 76th minute. Owayne Gordon continued his crisp scoring form by netting in the 86th minute. However, it was the only goal MBU would muster on a night when they dominated the ball-possession statistic. Already assured a semi-final place, Portmore, according to Hewitt, went about embellishing their head-to-head record against MBU, posting a third win over their title-chasing rivals in emphatic style and now have eyes peeled on the bonus $1 million for the team ending the regular season with the most points. Portmore lead the standings with 57 points, one clear of MBU, and followed by defending champions Arnett Gardens FC (54). UWI FC (42), Humble Lion FC (41) and Harbour View (39) are also in a keen battle for the final semi-final spot. “We are taking it one step at a time. From this game, we will now concentrate on the next game and hope it gets us where we need to be at the end,” Hewitt stated.last_img read more

first_imgKINGSTON:Road race veterans Rupert Green and Arieta Martin secured the respective male and female 5K titles at the Running Events 5K at Emancipation Park, New Kingston, on Sunday.Green, who represented Double Marchers club, won in 16:07, beating arch-rival Shawn Pitter of Body By Kurt (16:25). Ronique Williams, unattached, was third in 17:00.”I had to work very hard for this victory,” said Green. “Pitter had a huge lead on me, and I had to chase him all the way to the 3k, but once I got in front, I maintained my pace and the lead to the finish.”Martin, who also represented Double Marchers, stopped the clock at 20:50, followed by Karlene Blagrove, who clocked 21:59. Ina Daley was third in 22:16.She was doing the course for the first time.”I am pleased with my effort today. I am just coming off an injury, and I executed my race plan properly. The course was a tough one with a lot of inclines, but I enjoyed testing myself out there today,” exclaimed Martin.The 5K walk for the men went to Lenworth Hunter, while Paula Sinclair took the female equivalent.Worthy causeProceeds from the event will go towards the Wortley Home for Girls and, according to board chairman Raphael Sangster, the initiative is a welcome one at this time.”On June 29, we had a fire, which destroyed our dorms at the girls’ home, and it was the idea of Mr Alfred Francis to stage a 5K to raise funds to assist in the rebuilding of the dorms.”So I must say thanks to the Running Events team for their kind gesture, and we hope the success of the event will go a far way in helping us to get back on track at the Wortley Home for Girls,” said Sangster.Race director Francis believes the event was well received by the over 900 participants who came out to support the cause.”Even though August is a tough month to stage road races, we decided we had to put this event on to assist the charity, and we are pleased at the turn out and proud of the initiative.”Keisha Bowla-Hines of Trinidad & Tobago was pleased with her first road race on Jamaican soil.”My family came to Jamaica on holidays, and I went on the Running Events Limited website and saw that they had a race, so I decided to compete, and I must say that it is a fantastic event for a worthy cause,” said Bowla-Hines.last_img read more

first_img PRINCIPLES OF BATTING The top-order West Indies batsmen sometimes bat with no regard for the basics of the game, nor display the principles of good batting. Apart from not knowing the difference between aggression and carelessness, they drive when they should not be driving; they play back when they should not be playing back; and even when some of them do what is right, the lower-order batsmen do silly things. Sometimes, most times, when the team is in trouble, they get run-out, stumped, or caught on boundary going for big hits. That is the general attitude of the West Indian cricketer of today. The top-order batsmen do not bat responsibly and the lower-order batsmen bat as if they are as good as, or even better than the batsmen. How often does one see the recognised batsmen battling for survival, and at the other end, the tail-ender is swiping away until he is either stumped or gets caught on the boundary. No one supports the other, like all good team players do. The bowling is a little different, but how can a team select five specialist bowlers – including four specialist pacers – bowl 153 overs in one innings, and the four pacers bowl only 80 overs with the one spinner bowling 47 overs and a batsman bowling 27, more than any of the pacers. These things suggest that apart from the weakness of the players, the West Indies are not playing good cricket, despite the presence of a support group of four coaches, a former captain as manager, and another former captain as chief selector. Maybe the coaches are not any good, or may be, with the exception of Curtley Ambrose, the players just do not listen to them. The West Indies have just played finished a two-match series in Sri Lanka. They lost both matches badly, they enjoyed one good day, and the players, the team, are still in the same position as they were before the contest started. According to the captain, the batsmen lack good temperament and they have no patience. The truth, however, is that although the players have changed in the 20 years since Sabina Park in 1995, although the coaches have changed, although the selectors have changed, and although the board presidents have changed many times, Walcott’s words in Durban 1998 remain true to this day. The West Indies go to Australia in December, and, as usual, much is expected. It is always, according to them, unfortunate that the batsmen, who get to 10, 20, or 30, fail on a pitch that was good for batting, one on which opposing batsmen of similar or less experience score centuries, and one on which the bowlers, more times than not, always bowl well, picking up one or two wickets when the opposing bowlers reel in five or six wickets to beat the West Indies handsomely. It is also disappointing to hear, time and time again, that, but for the many dropped catches, the West Indies may have won. It is time they understand that catches are a part of cricket. It is sometimes, most times, the difference between a good team and a bad team, between victory and defeat. The West Indies cricketers, at this time, are generally poor cricketers. They are nowhere near the standard of previous West Indies cricketers, and they should know that that is so, or they should be told that it is so. Some of them got into the team by the skin of their teeth, some of them just ahead of not just another player or two, but ahead of several players. In other words, they got into the team when others could also easily have made the team. In fact, on many occasions, some got into the team when they were obviously not good enough, and never will be good enough. Instead of behaving like they are God’s gift to cricket, therefore, they should try to be West Indies cricketers. The batsmen, for example, should try and bat even for a reasonable time, they should concentrate, and as Phil Simmons encouraged them to do a few months ago, they should, for example, bat with an eye on the scoreboard, sometimes scoring a little at a time. POOR CRICKETERS BAT ACCORDING TO SKILL Walcott went on to explain that the batsmen needed to concentrate, to bat according to their skill, to bat to match the situation, and to bat for the team. “They should not, all of them, bat as if they are the best batsmen in the world, with respect for no one; as if they are all like Lara.” In South Africa, Walcott was right. Since that time, he has been right many times, and had he been alive and said it in this time, he definitely would also have been right. Test match cricketers are beyond the ordinary, or should be beyond the ordinary. The West Indies cricketers, a few of them, are beyond the ordinary. Most of them, however, are not, and it is time the West Indian fans face that fact. West Indies captains of recent vintage, the selectors, the manager, the coaches, and team’s media rep always, each time the team loses, talk about the talented batsmen and bowlers in the team. They always have some flattering words for the players. It is high time, however, that the people in charge stop making excuses for the players. CHANGE IN ATTITUDE Some 20 years ago, the West Indies’ long and distinguished reign as champions of the world came to an end, and today, they are still fighting to recover some of the lost glory – especially in Test cricket. The reason why it has taken them so long to dust themselves off is probably because they believe that are better than they really are. The late Sir Clyde Walcott said in Durban in 1998 during a Test match between the West Indies and South Africa, “The problem with the West Indies is that they believe that they are good, too good to be exact.” Walcott, a former great West Indies batsman, chief selector, manager, and president, as well as a former chairman of the International Cricket Conference, was in South Africa watching the West Indies who were about to lose the third Test match and the series 5-0. That was a tour which started with the West Indies players threatening to go on strike, and that was a West Indies team which included batsmen such as Brian Lara, Carl Hooper, and Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Philo Wallace, Clayton Lambert, and Stuart Williams; and bowlers like Curtly Ambrose, Courtney Walsh, Franklyn Rose, and Nixon McLean. If there is no change in the attitude of the players, however; if there is no change in the selection process; if there is no change in the personality and quality of coaches to get the players to listen to them and to try and follow their instructions; and if there is no change in the quality of players coming out of the islands by their performances in the regional competition, the result will be the same – probably even worse. The players are weak, and so is the eleven selected. I do not know how to balance the team but I do know that in the present situation, a team of five specialist batsmen, with Denesh Ramdin at number six, and five specialist bowlers cannot work. When all is said and done, the players must take most of the blame for what is happening to West Indies cricket. After all, they are the ones who do the batting, bowling and fielding. They must better prepare themselves to do so.last_img read more

first_imgVALENCIA, Spain (AP):Jorge Lorenzo won his third MotoGP title with a victory at the season-ending Valencia GP yesterday as Valentino Rossi failed to make up enough ground on his Yamaha team-mate from the back of the grid.Lorenzo entered the race trailing Rossi by seven points but the veteran Italian couldn’t manage more than a fourth-place finish. Rossi, who needed second place to guarantee the title, started last on the grid because of a penalty for kicking Marc Marquez in the previous race.Lorenzo finished with 330 points, five more than Rossi, who was trying to win his eighth world title and the first since 2009.”I tried to focus to go as fast as possible,” Lorenzo said. “I just wanted to keep my concentration and prayed to finish the race.”Lorenzo added to his MotoGP triumphs in 2010 and 2012, after wins in the 250cc category in 2006 and 2007. The 28-year-old Spaniard started from pole position and stayed in front at the Ricardo Tormo circuit outside Valencia. He grabbed Spain’s flag and rode with it around the track in his victory lap.”It was very emotional. I was crying throughout the victory lap,” he said. “What we achieved today is huge after a very difficult season. Five times now. I’m very proud to have won this world title for Spain.”Marquez, the winner of the last two MotoGP championships, finished the race right behind Lorenzo in second, but never tried to make a significant move for the lead. Dani Pedrosa, winner of two of the last three races, was third to close out the all-Spanish podium.last_img read more

first_imgMany-time winning Jamaica captaiN Tamar Lambert, has been omitted from the Jamaica Scorpions squad for their sixth-round WICB First-Class Tournament clash away to the Leeward Islands Hurricanes next weekend.Lambert, who was overlooked for Jamaica’s first two matches of the season, but was recalled following a series of poor batting performances, participated in the team’s third, fourth and fifth encounters.However, following equally low batting returns on his part, as well as subpar batting during the WICB Super50 one-day tournament in Trinidad and Tobago last month, the national selection panel has decided to look past the 34-year-old once more.The 13-member squad, which departs next week, includes seven specialist batsmen.This follows the return of young West Indies strokemaker, Jermaine Blackwood, and the recall of Kirk Edwards and Shacaya Thomas.Edwards, following average returns in the team’s first four outings, missed their fifth match due to injury, while Thomas, the tournament’s second highest runscorer two seasons ago and one of the outstanding batsmen at the preseason national trials, is yet to make an appearance this season.The Jamaica Scorpions, respective fourth- and fifth-place finishers for the past two seasons, are currently third in the six-team standings with five rounds of matches to go.With a record of three wins and two defeats, they have 53 points, 10 less that Barbados Pride, with runaway leaders and title-holders Guyana Jaguars on top with 85.Jamaica Scorpions squad: Paul Palmer Jr (captain), John Campbell, Kirk Edwards, Jermaine Blackwood, AndrÈ McCarthy, Devon Thomas, Carlton Baugh Jr, David Bernard Jr, Nikita Miller, Damion Jacobs, Sheldon Cottrell, Marquino Mindley, Shacaya Thomas.last_img read more

first_imgNot very often in recent times have we had credible cause to heap praises on the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB). The success of the Under-19 team presents us with one such precious moment. Conversely, the splintered criticisms of the board, pointing to the inadequacy of preparation of the triumphant team, seems spurious, irrational and lacking credibility. Since the objective of preparing any sporting team for competition is for that team to be victorious, in the advent that the team is victorious, there can be no guarantees that having prepared the team differently the team would still have been victorious. It is by that general principle that these particular criticisms of the WICB should be rubbished. If the WICB and the coaching staff had it to do all over again with the same set of players, it would be foolhardy for them to do anything significantly different. The WICB president, Mr Dave Cameron, speaking on the arrival of the three Jamaican players in the squad, quite rightly took credit for the part the board played in the selection and preparation of the team. Mr Cameron pointed to the fact that at least five members of the team are already playing professionally and that the core of the team was selected as far back as 2014 and actually competed in the regional 50-over competition in the very same year. REGULAR TRAINING CAMPS Subsequent to that, there were regular training camps leading into the tournament, with the preparation culminating in a three-match warm-up series against the host nation of the tournament, Bangladesh. The genesis of these criticisms, I suspect, emanated from the relatively sparse number of warm-up games the team played leading into the World Cup compared top teams such as India, who played consistently together for two years and were unbeaten coming into the tournament. Bangladesh, we were told, played closer to a dozen warm-up games and were red hot early in the tournament, as were the Indians. The West Indies emphatically destroyed the myth of perfection that relates to the preparation of both India and Bangladesh by beating both when it mattered most. It is, therefore, quite plausible that the West Indies’ preparations were better than that of both Bangladesh and India. The West Indies team was the sharpest team mentally in the tournament, as evidenced by those two huge tournament changing moments, starting with that crucial run out against Zimbabwe, followed by the big stumping of the Indian star batsman in the final. SHARP, TALENTED Not only were they sharp mentally, they are talented, they were motivated and they appeared to get fitter and sharper as the tournament progressed, while the more fancied teams, with their so-called superior preparation, faded and fizzed at the business end of the tournament. The silly assumption being made is that because India and Bangladesh played 20 or 30 warm-up games between them they were better prepared. That is obviously not necessarily so. There is always the risk of overworking and burning out the players, plus there are cultural differences that must be considered. West Indians are naturally stronger and more natural athletes and perhaps need less physical drilling and more psychological work. The success of this West Indies team might very well serve to redefine the way teams at this level are prepared for competition, with less physical and game sessions and more mental and psychological preparedness. The victorious players, coaching staff, as well as the WICB leadership should all be congratulated for executing plans and preparations that in the end were proven to be perfect by the fact that the West Indies Under-19 team lifted the ultimate prize.last_img read more

first_imgNicholas ‘The Axeman’ Walters, the Jamaican boxing star, is learning the hard way that although he can knock out opponents on a regular basis, (he has done so 21 times in 27 fights), it is much more difficult to win a negotiating battle with 84-year-old, Bob Arum.Arum is the head of Top Rank, one of the most successful boxing promoting companies in the world.For the past year, a fight between Walters, who until recently held the World Boxing Association (WBA) featherweight super title and Vasyl Lomachenko, the World Boxing Organization (WBO) featherweight champion, has been one of the talking points in boxing circles.The plot one heard from time to time was for Walters and Lomachenko to meet different boxers on the same fight card, and presuming that both fighters won, they would then move into a mega clash with each other.Things took an unlikely turn, however, when Walters lost his title on the scales at the Madison Square Garden weigh-in on June 12, 2015, for a fight scheduled for the next day against Miguel Marriaga.He won that fight convincingly, but the all-important title was no longer his, and this weakened his bargaining power in the negotiations.December 19 drawOn December 19 last year in his next fight, this time as a super featherweight (130 pounds) against Jason Sosa, he ended up with a draw decision. The consensus was that he did win that fight, but the records speak loudly, and his bargaining power again dropped a notch.Promoter Arum decided to fast-forward the proposed Walters versus Lomachenko fight and negotiations started. There was, however, a difference with those negotiations. Instead of being carried out by his long-time manager, Jacques Deschamps, Walters himself took over.There has been some unease in his camp, because Walters was of the view that his purse for the Nonito Donaire title fight was not enough.Deschamps told The Gleaner that it was in fact lower than he would normally have gone for, but he took the strategic decision to accept what was offered, confident that Walters would win the title and boost his future bargaining and earning power.The mission was accomplished when Walters stopped Donaire in six rounds and became a super champion, but Walters was still unhappy and decided that he wanted to do his own negotiations.Information is that Walters did not do a good job with those subsequent negotiations. When the offer to fight Lomachenko came about, however, Walters decided to go for broke.Arum has stated publicly that the Walters demand to fight Lomachenko is for US$1million, a price he is not willing to pay. The Gleaner understands that Arum offered him US$550,000 instead, but Walters has refused that offer. They have been unable to come to any agreement, and last word is that Arum has moved on and is negotiating with WBO Super featherweight champion Roman Martinez to fight Lomachenko instead on June 11.The Gleaner has been unable to contact Walters for a comment as his telephone goes to voice mail and he has not responded to requests for a return call.His father, Job, told The Gleaner yesterday that he knows of the negotiations and he, too, believes that Walters is worth more than is being offered by Arum.He is, however, hopeful that regardless of what happens now, the fight will eventually take place.last_img read more

first_imgVasyl Lomachenko, the World Boxing Organisation (WBO) featherweight champion, will fight Roman ‘Rocky’ Martinez for his World Boxing Organisation super featherweight title on June 11 at the Madison Square Garden Theatre in New York.This fight was arranged by Bob Arum, the head of the Top Rank promotion company, in place of a fight he had planned between Lomachenko and Jamaica’s Nicholas ‘The Axeman’ Walters, the former World Boxing Association featherweight super champion.Arum tried for months to get Walters to agree to a fight with Lomachenko with the Ukranian title at stake, but Walters, who has elected recently to do his own negotiations, instead of allowing his manager Jacques Deschamps to do so, priced himself out of the fight.Arum stated publicly that Walters wanted US$1 million to fight Lomachenko, a purse that Arum rejected immediately. It is reported that Lomachenko agreed to a purse of $850,000 and that Arum made a first offer of US$550,000 to Walters, which he rejected. The negotiations went out of the window quickly, and Arum again stated publicly that he had ceased negotiations with Walters and would move to find another opponent for Lomachenko.He had discussions with two fighters after this, and in a short time, it was agreed that Lomachenko would move up to the super featherweight division, 130 pounds, to fight the champion Martinez for his title. The fight is on and will take place on June 11, and the official announcement was made in New York on ThursdayNO WORD AS YETWalters, in the meantime, is out in the cold. The Gleaner has tried repeatedly to make contact with him without success. His manager, Deschamps, however, told The Gleaner yesterday that he has been following what is going on keenly and he, too, has not heard from Walters.”I am still his manager, and I am ready to get back to doing what I have done successfully for him since before he became a professional boxer in August 2008.”I moulded his career and negotiated the right fights for him until he became world champion. He has made some mistakes recently, but he is still one of the best fighters in the world, and we can get back there. I am optimistic that we will clear this hurdle,” he said.In the meantime, the fight between Walters and Lomachenko, which was supposed to be one of the boxing highlights of 2016, is now on the back burner.last_img read more

first_imgSagicor Group’s ‘A’ netball team are the Business House Divisional Intermediate ‘A’ League Netball winners for 2016. Sagicor emerged the winners in a fiercely fought game with JN Group, which saw the 2016 champions emerging with a score of 43-34. The Business House Netball Association Intermediate ‘A’ League, opened on August 20th 2016, with a total of twelve teams contesting the tournament. This is the first time that Sagicor Group is topping the competition since the then Life of Jamaica (LOJ) won the Junior League in 2004. They subsequently went on to the 2011 final against GraceKennedy in the Intermediate ‘A’ League where they were placed second. Sasha Dixon of Sagicor was given the Most Valuable Player title for the final, which was played on Saturday at the National Arena.last_img read more